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45

Preface: I've been drafting this for a few days now. I focused on the cards that were banned, because those were the most broken. I'm sure there were dozens of other combos not included here, and this is by no means giving the fullest extent of how the cards could be used to maximize their broken-ness. The first step is to take a look at what cards were ...


16

AlphaGo Now there is AlphaGo by Deep Mind, a company recently bought by Google playing currently a match against 9p Lee Sedol. It is the Deep Blue of Go. EDIT: The final result of the match of five games was AlphaGo 4 – Lee Sedol 1. This confirms the former conjecture: AlphaGo is the Deep Blue of Go.


16

The Fluxx Wiki has lists of the composition of the various decks linked off this page. Here's my attempts at answering your specific questions: Cards in v2 not in v3: Doughnuts The Eye The Pyramid Taxes Coffee & Doughnuts Death & Taxes The Great Seal The Mind's Eye Money (No Taxes) Pilfer the Trash Trash Hand Limit Trash Keeper Limit Brain Bonus ...


14

Strangely, Wikipedia has this information: Paths of Glory (August 19, 2001 - February 20,2002) Tigris and Euphrates (February 20, 2002 - 2002) Puerto Rico (2002 - August 2008) Agricola (August 2008 - December 2010) Twilight Struggle (January 2011 - December 2015) Pandemic Legacy: Season 1 (January 2016 - Present). As Jefromi's answer ...


10

I agree with Lo'oris' argument that most older well known games are still widespread mostly because they already are everywhere. How many people go out and buy chess boards compared to the number of people who simply have them around from previous generations? I think there are some additional aspects: Simplicity In my experience games need a good balance ...


10

A definitive answer would require someone who has a collection of all the printing of UNO since the beginning in 1971 to present day. The only one likely to have such an museum quality collection is the estate of the inventor of the game, Merle Robbins, an Ohio barber. He spent $8,000 to have 5,000 copies made. He sold the rights to the game to International ...


10

There have been several times in MtG history that the game was broken for a while. Black Summer, with the proliferation of Necropotence decks, Affinity decks that abused cheap artifacts and artifact lands, and Combo Winter that resulted in the largest number of bannings. Mark Rosewater discusses why cards get banned and restricted. While not all the cards ...


9

If you scrape all the versions of the current browse page on archive.org (that's sorted by geek rating, right?), you get this: 2009-02-05 Agricola (2007) 2010-04-07 Puerto Rico (2002) 2010-11-05 Agricola (2007) 2010-11-21 Puerto Rico (2002) 2011-01-06 Twilight Struggle (2005) 2011-01-16 Puerto Rico (2002) 2011-02-03 Twilight Struggle (2005) 2016-01-01 ...


8

While not a direct answer, check out the recent "Hobby Games, the 100 best" book. It has games from the last 100 years and there is a lot of history contained within its page. Each entry is written by a game designer as well. I enjoyed the book very much, learned a ton.


8

There is a good detail on Scrabble Bingo's on the Wikipedia page here. Bingo is a game where each player is issued a card with numbers. A caller calls out numbers drawn at random and the player will cross of numbers on their card. The first person to have all of their numbers crossed off will shout out Bingo! So there is a parallel between this game where ...


8

Having spent a little while looking into this, the only clear thing is that there is no firm evidence for any distant historical first date for Tic Tac Toe. Although many people claim the Romans played this game, in the form of Terni Lapilli, and point to the large number of historical boards that exist, scratched into walls, this seems unlikely, not least ...


8

This has most likely been passed down throughout the generations as "the way to do it", without any actual backing reasons, but there are some situations where it is beneficial to put the money under the edge of the game board. Small playing areas (such as a small table) where space is at a minimum, so it makes sense to conserve space by putting money ...


7

History of these ancient boardgames is a bit murky due to their really old age. The wikipedia article on Hnefatafl is a good starting point, but you can already see from that how vague the information is. Hnefatafl being played since around 400 is certainly older than Chess. In fact, it can be considered a predecessor of Chess. A not so easy relation is ...


7

In the seafarers expansion, you cannot move or build a ship to or from a hex containing the pirate. This could be where the house-rule applying to the robber too came from, by blocking land-based building rather than sea-based building.


7

On an 19x19 board there is no computer that evens top level players (9p) as of November 2011. It seems that the strongest programs for the moment use Monte Carlo methods and from time to time matches with pro's are organised, though usually with handicap. The level reached by programs for the last couple of years seems to indicate that they need at least 7 ...


7

According to the Candy Land 50th Anniversary Edition Rules: 1985: “The Legend of the Lost Candy Castle” story and characters introduced to game. I presume, Since Lord Licorice is the antagonist of that story, that he was introduced then. 'They'll never find the hidden King or his Castle,' Lord Licorice says sourly... 'for I have hidden them from ...


7

Monopoly and Risk were better than many others when they came out, so they were successful and became very widespread: now their "appeal" is only based on either nostalgia, or "getting used to them", or "not knowing the better alternatives", because overall they are very very poor games (especially Monopoly). In general boardgames have a better ...


6

Something I find that helps tremendously in replayability is variable start-up. This is critical to games like Settlers of Catan and Dominion. Every time you start things are going to be very different and require a different strategy. Compare this to something like monopoly, which is going to start exactly the same and have the exact same strategies almost ...


6

As xiaohouzi (little monkey?) said, "bingo" comes from the game of Bingo. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word "bingo" comes from the word "bing" for a pile of something. In this case, presumably, it would be a pile of coins that you win for getting the right pattern on your card. The word "bing" is an old-fashioned word but still in use in ...


6

Wikipedia has an entry on the History of Chess. It states that the differences between what is now modern chess began in Europe in the 15th century. Besides the name changes for the pieces, the rules differed. The section covering The Indo-Arabic game appears to reference, Murray H.J.R. 1913. The history of chess. Oxford. reprint ISBN 0-936317-01-9 In ...


6

There are a number of different hands that have a specific name. For example, A-2-3-4-5 is called a Wheel. The Royal Flush obviously gets its name from being the highest hand, and specifically having royalty in it (although one could argue so does a King high.) As for the mistake of ranking of Straight Flush being lower than 4 of a kind, this is easily ...


5

In Edo period go, the system worked like this: Even: Taiga-sen (Alternating Black and White) One Dan difference: San-Ai-Sen (Black two out of three games) Two Dan difference: Josen (Always Black) Three Dan difference: Sen-Ni-Sen (Black two games, two stones on game) Four Dan difference: Sen-Ni (Alternating Black and two stones) Five Dan difference: (Always ...


5

I never thought of it, but now that you do mention it, I do recall sliding Monopoly money under the board separated by denomination (as a kid in the 80s). The best reason I can think for why we did that is that it was simply fun to pretend you were pulling money out of a cash register. You could argue it made making change or putting together amounts faster, ...


4

I would guess it was Multiple Discovery. The rules have not changed significantly from 4th Edition from the original. The only noteworthy changes in 4th Edtion are that harbor placement is fixed, the Robber is allowed to move to the desert tile, and the merging of Trading/Building phases. This Robber blocking building isn't listed as any official variant, ...


4

Others have already mentioned the general history of the three games, but I can add a bit about hnefatafl itself. The game seems to have similarities to an earlier Roman game, ludus latrunculorum, which was descended from an ancient Greek game, petteia. Both of these older games shared hnefatafl's straight-line move and its capture method of surrounding ...


4

I'm going to use a bit of lateral thinking to answer this question - since our site is Board Games: Stack Exchange but we spend about half our time here talking about card games, hopefully a trading card game is a valid answer. The biggest ever "board/card game flop" that I can think of is Netrunner. Given that Magic the Gathering had recently been such a ...


4

According to Wikipedia: Puppet Stayman, initially developed by Neil Silverman and refined by Kit Woolsey and Steve Robinson in 1977-78 If you can locate copies of the April 1977 and April 1978 editions of The Bridge World magazine that might have more details on the history of the system. As to why it's called puppet stayman, this page has an answer ...


4

After reading this article I could find several references to games played during the precolumbian era. For some of them the rules are unknown but here is the list (to be completed) : Patolli played by Teotihuacanos, Toltecs, etc. Before Christ ! Bul Awithlaknakwe Totolospi


3

The best source I've found so far is the Wikipedia timelines.



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