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6

History of these ancient boardgames is a bit murky due to their really old age. The wikipedia article on Hnefatafl is a good starting point, but you can already see from that how vague the information is. Hnefatafl being played since around 400 is certainly older than Chess. In fact, it can be considered a predecessor of Chess. A not so easy relation is ...


3

Others have already mentioned the general history of the three games, but I can add a bit about hnefatafl itself. The game seems to have similarities to an earlier Roman game, ludus latrunculorum, which was descended from an ancient Greek game, petteia. Both of these older games shared hnefatafl's straight-line move and its capture method of surrounding ...


2

I think what you have bought is a Tablut set, which is a reduced version, and actually survived into the twentieth century. Viking Hnefatafl had 25 defenders and 50 attackers on a larger board, but the rules are (believed to be) the same. And Thud, from the link, is a board game (inspired by Discworld) created by Trevor Truran. It seems a bit unfair to try ...


2

I do not know about the others, but I can tell a little about the history of Go, one of the oldest board games in existence. There are various sources on Go history, but especially the early stages are widely different in each. The source used here is generally well accepted among Go players. It is certain that Go was invented in China (called weiqi there). ...


1

In my experience (albeit with a slightly different tafl variant), a key part of white's strategy is maintaining the ability to play towards any of the corner squares. The throne square isn't intrinsically all that much safer than any other square on the board. Initially, keeping your king near the center makes it easier to take advantage of momentary gaps ...


1

I see you ask about the origins of Hnefatafl, which are obviously hard to trace since the Vikings had effectively no written history. It is possible that Chaturanga, a precursor of Chess, had some influence; it was certainly played in Persia and Iraq at the time when Viking traders reached there. There really isn't much likeness, though, particularly since ...



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