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12

I would veer away from having to paying money to raise armies, which, depending on implementation, might be perceived badly (as either being able to pay money to buy huge armies, or requiring money to even make it to the end by having to pay ever-increasing amounts of money just to play.) Instead, I would suggest allowing players to pay money to re-roll the ...


12

There's two schools of thought on this subject - one is that you can do anything unless the rules say you can't, the other is that you can only do what the rules say you can. I believe there's a better argument for the second case, because the rules are generally written to define the game, and can't expressly prohibit everything you might try to do. The ...


12

The goal in TTR is not "complete the cards you're given", it's "get the most points". There are plenty of ways to do this with short routes (e.g. by focusing on building only length 4+, not going for longest route, and picking the spots where everyone wants to go). If no one in your group wants to adjust their play style to match the cards they're dealt, ...


10

Of course this can happen, but the expectation is that all the players help contribute to finding solutions to the current problems. While you might see one path, someone else might see another, that happens to be better. Having multiple people working on the same problem from different perspectives generally provides better results. Kind of like crowd ...


8

I have two reasons to conclude you pay to the bank: The rulebook doesn't say that you have to pay to the bank when building a district. This is assumed because it wouldn't make sense otherwise. Similarly, if the rulebook doesn't say whom to pay to destroy, then I assume it must go to the bank. The warlord can destroy one of it's own district if he wants to ...


8

For my suggestion of a house rule to use, please see the section of this answer titled "Embargo Counters". If I understand correctly, you were learning the game naturally by playing it - it's just that at the current stage of learning it you have got to, it isn't very interesting, which makes it harder than it has been to carry on learning it simply by ...


7

I disagree that the player who draws the longest routes has an advantage. A winning play in Ticket to Ride (TTR) doesn't boil down simply to that. Here are a few reasons why I don't think changing the rules is necessary (according to my many many TTR games played): Many games can be won by completing only small routes, and by using connections that are ...


7

We have played 2-3 times a month for a long time. Of course games are shorter with fewer people and go faster when everyone is well acquainted with the game. We have played normal extended version games in about an hour with 3 people. We recently added a column of property spaces on each town to extend play - you could remove a column to shorten play. ...


7

Play it more often. I finish two-player games with an expert friend in about 50 minutes, after having played a lot over the Internet and live. As you start learning the buildings and understand the two fundamental strategies of the game, i.e., building vs shipping, you'll start realizing your chances faster. There are a lot of house rules you can apply to ...


6

This is inspired by the action-choosing mechanism from Speculation. Start of game setup: Get six objects that can represent planeswalk/chaos/nothing: colored marbles, Scrabble tiles, popsicle sticks with symbols drawn on them, etc. Place the objects in an opaque bag. When the player wants to "roll": The player pays the cost for rolling and chooses an ...


6

I think you have to understand the game sufficiently to gauge whether the information really is secret or not. For games where information isn't secret due to being calculatable, it sounds like a good, sporting house rule to instead play openly rather than punishing less acute players. Good etiquette would mean communicating why you wish to invoke this ...


6

I think the best house rules here are going to be the ones which don't actually change mechanics of the game, and which encourage or at least allow you to play well, i.e. ones that are consistent with the better than big money strategies with most sets of kingdom cards. That way as you continue to get better at the game under your house rules, everything ...


5

I'll take the other side here. Keeping private notes is always ok (unless the rules specifically forbid it.) When I'm playing a game like Settlers of Catan, I can keep track of what other players have in their hands without too much difficulty. Am I acting against the rules by simply remembering what's happened so far? Using a piece of scrap paper to ...


4

As it says in the rules for Shattered Empire, if you're using the Age of Empire variant, you have to use the Imperial II strategy card rather than Bureaucracy.


4

Meta suggestion: Playtest: I strongly suggest that you do a dry run with whatever combination of rule modifications you come up with. Maybe give a few Risk-loving friends allocations (different allocations, since different people will have different amounts of money they are willing to spend) of poker chips, and try some of the rule ideas that get ...


4

It's against the rules. The rules call for playing with the cards kept secret, but tracking everyone's resources on paper would be virtually no different than playing with all cards revealed. It makes the game less enjoyable. It slows the game down. It leads to "what did I miss" type questions. It takes your attention away from players, reducing social ...


4

I think you shouldn't limit the possible actions by removing the money, but you could try to somehow devalue money cards. One way to do this would be to give money cards a negative victory point value, like copper -1, silver -3, gold -6 victory points. You would both start the game with -7 victory points obviously, but it doesn't really matter. For a weaker ...


4

The rules seem very explicit. "The captain turns his over and carries out the two actions" "In turn, the other players do the same: they turn over their card and carry out the two actions" I can't comment on what the effect of your house rule would be, but it clearly is not the intended way to play.


4

That doesn't sound too bad, except that the drawn cards could be really off. Alternatively, you could try to play a cooperative variant. These two are interesting: The game is cooperative. Each player is the storyteller five times for a total of 10 turns and you go for a high score. The highest possible is 70. Neither player has a hand. Each ...


4

A quick Google web search reveals this post for the Easter Festival (yes, it's the same author although a different name). The full rules for both expansions can be found in the downloads sections of Carcassonne Central (you'll need to register, but it's free to do so). Easter Festival - Rules Easter Festival - Tiles City Gates Rules - English translation ...


4

It sounds like you're describing Fox and Hounds here: The four Hounds can only move forward diagonally. The Fox can move forward or backwards diagonally. There is no jumping or capturing involved; the Hounds win when the Fox can't make any legal moves, and the Fox wins if it reaches the far rank (where the Hounds started). This game is inherently ...


3

This might be slightly beyond the scope of what you want, but if you're looking for interesting map layouts, there are a bunch at CatanMaps.com. The emphasis for their maps is more on creativity than on "balanced" game boards, but most of the boards I have seen there are also pretty well balanced. Regarding a balanced tournament layout, they have one ...


3

I found a number of "ways to play" on the Story Cubes website. Some just involve getting more or other dice and are little more then showcases or advertisements for different sets, but others are actually house rules, or alternate rules. I will be trying those out. #4 Superheroes Each person roles 3 cubes and uses these to create a superhero (superpowers ...


3

I play with a large group of people (5+) when we play Planechase, and we have a runnning rule: after 2 null rolls, you flip a coin and call it for either planar or chaos. While it assures an eventual result for spending the mana, it also limits the ability to spend it freely to achieve a result by placing a 50% chance at the end, which can be devastating. ...


3

If you don't have a discard during the game, it means you have played all of your cards, so the round ends. You can end the round either by discarding your final card, or by playing all cards in your hand. The color doesn't change in Phase 10. Perhaps you are thinking of Uno rules? You can discard any card you like; the color doesn't matter.


3

You could allow players to buy Risk cards (they eventually turn into armies when you get a set) - $5 per card, only can buy one card per turn. This would allow 'eliminated' players to buy back in - as if they collect a set while 'eliminated' (by buying a card each round) they could get some armies and attack back in (say, allowing them to attack back in at ...


3

Among people you don't know as well or don't know at all (the key here is familiarity, not exactly what you stated at the end of your question about people you don't see regularly per se), it's typically safe to fall back to the assumption that games are played more socially and less competitively. You can imagine any number of brutal or brilliant ...


3

I'm glad you enjoy this aspect of Hex, but the poorly-written rules and bountiful edge-cases are, in my opinion, maddening :). If I'd been there I'd have argued that "Level" would have worked for him in this situation but only if he had no other cards in his hand that would have been legal plays. Since he had "Turn-aside-right" then "Level" doesn't work ...


3

How much have you played? I agree that someone who gets lucky and gets several long tickets that are all along the same route will have a big advantage. However, other players can disrupt the player by blocking his routes... in which case he loses a lot points. Also - the 1910 expansion has a 'most tickets' complete bonus -which gives a bonus 15 ...


3

1) If all but you gets cards that provide $ from 1 or 2 valued rolls, then it kind of does devolve into that. Early on, get a few of those cards, but then shoot for 2 dice, and some cards that trigger on the 4 - 10 range. You'll be able to leech off of the single-die players, but can still do your own thing. 2) play with the variant where not all cards ...



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