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12

I would veer away from having to paying money to raise armies, which, depending on implementation, might be perceived badly (as either being able to pay money to buy huge armies, or requiring money to even make it to the end by having to pay ever-increasing amounts of money just to play.) Instead, I would suggest allowing players to pay money to re-roll the ...


11

You could do, the game would work perfectly well without farmers. I would argue against it because this still leaves the new players in a position where they don't see farms being used and don't see how they can score highly if placed well despite the long-term sacrifice of a piece. In my experience with teaching Carcassonne, players tend to go very ...


10

someone we play with regularly insisted on a rule that you're not allowed to purchase a "lower" technology power plant than you already have. e.g. if you have 13,17,25 as your power plants, you can't buy 24 or lower if they come up. Incorrect. You can buy any power plant that is in the market (the lowest four numbered plants). if a player didn't ...


7

One way to speed up the game is to increase resource production. There are two common approaches to this: During setup, each player's second placement is a city. This gives a boost to everyone's economy/engine from the start. Play a 3/4-player game with the map layout for 5/6 players. There will be many more spots, more valuable spots, and less ...


7

Doing a quick search for "chess" and "immobilizer" led me to Baroque Chess.


6

A couple points of advice here - 1) One easy way to teach the farm mechanic is to run through a sample game of perhaps 5 turns. Make sure to drop a farmer or two during this sample and at the end go through the scoring process. This will get you to the "aha" moment that people have about farmers much more quickly. 2) the game can certainly work without ...


6

Firstly, to extend the game you will need to add twice the train pieces as well as 2 boards. Maybe you should double the tickets too. This soon degrades into playing two different games at the same time, where you choose which one to play each round. The second problem is all the advantage is on the side of playing on only one board. This is because adding ...


6

There are some good suggestions all over the internet for making a three-player board more competetive in the early game. They all boil down to either removing hexes, or replacing them with desert pieces. The amount of hexes you replace/remove depends on preference, but I'd recommend either removing three or five total hexes. When removing five, just remove ...


5

This is inspired by the action-choosing mechanism from Speculation. Start of game setup: Get six objects that can represent planeswalk/chaos/nothing: colored marbles, Scrabble tiles, popsicle sticks with symbols drawn on them, etc. Place the objects in an opaque bag. When the player wants to "roll": The player pays the cost for rolling and chooses an ...


4

http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgameexpansion/148931/coup-reformation is the expansion for more than 6 players. It contains 15 cards; 3 of each rather than 2 of each. I think the rules from the game say how many cards to use for how many players, since someone quotes it as 25(5 of each) cards for 9-10 players. Since you use 15(3 of each) cards for 6 players, ...


4

Just to add my 2 cents, I taught the game to my kids (when they were 9). Everything was easy, except how to explain to them the concept of farms. After a few games without any farms, I let them put some meeples inside a field after the game was finished so they could understand how farms work. Now they are playing with farms, but they are not very good with ...


4

As it says in the rules for Shattered Empire, if you're using the Age of Empire variant, you have to use the Imperial II strategy card rather than Bureaucracy.


4

I have two reasons to conclude you pay to the bank: The rulebook doesn't say that you have to pay to the bank when building a district. This is assumed because it wouldn't make sense otherwise. Similarly, if the rulebook doesn't say whom to pay to destroy, then I assume it must go to the bank. The warlord can destroy one of it's own district if he wants to ...


4

Meta suggestion: Playtest: I strongly suggest that you do a dry run with whatever combination of rule modifications you come up with. Maybe give a few Risk-loving friends allocations (different allocations, since different people will have different amounts of money they are willing to spend) of poker chips, and try some of the rule ideas that get ...


3

The most truly objective method may be to conduct a scientifically rigorous poll. You will need a random sampling of people from the world, we'll limit it to native English speakers to ensure that translation doesn't become a concern. Each will need to be kidnapped to prevent self-selection bias, and deprived of both sight and sound so that other factors ...


3

There are various ideas that I've used in the past to help. Be warned though - ultimately long games are long, and there's only a limited amount you can do about it. 1) Use a timer Timed negotiation phases go back to Diplomacy. They're an official rule feature of Here I Stand. Not only does the time limit help the game along, and focus players, but it ...


3

Generally when I play games like that and a miss play is caught before the next trick is played then the play is corrected. However if it is caught later then the player that messed up losses the hand. In hearts for example they would take all 26 points and everyone else would get 0. In a game where you want points they take the penalty for not getting the ...


3

If you don't have a discard during the game, it means you have played all of your cards, so the round ends. You can end the round either by discarding your final card, or by playing all cards in your hand. The color doesn't change in Phase 10. Perhaps you are thinking of Uno rules? You can discard any card you like; the color doesn't matter.


3

You could allow players to buy Risk cards (they eventually turn into armies when you get a set) - $5 per card, only can buy one card per turn. This would allow 'eliminated' players to buy back in - as if they collect a set while 'eliminated' (by buying a card each round) they could get some armies and attack back in (say, allowing them to attack back in at ...


2

Tweaking with the starting deck is a handicap that scales on most Kingdom setups and, in particular, replacing Copper(s) with Silver(s). Before analyzing this, here is why some other handicaps would not work: Deduct points: it's simple to apply, but not simple to design it, as it's arbitrary. You have to decide before the start of the game, but on what ...


2

If you have just two investigators in total, time is of the essence. There is no time to slack, and every missed opportunity to act is another token on the doom track. Therefore: Avoid monsters. They stop your movement when they engage. The terror track is less of an issue than the doom track. Hunt for clue tokens. As in, try to arrange your movement ...


2

Check out the Civ Expansion Project. Allows up to 18 players!


2

A two-player version that my son and I came up with was pretty fun. Here are the altered rules: OBJECTIVE: Be the first player to retire your four heroes at level 6. SETUP: Start by separating out all the Class and Race cards. In the standard Munchkin game you will find 21. Shuffle these cards together. Next, deal 4 cards to each player. Each player places ...


2

The standard way to create balance in Axis & Allies is to use secret bidding. For example, bid an amount of money that Germany would get extra at the start of the first round of the game (the one bidding lowest gets to play Germany). For example, two players bid in secret. Player A bids 20 and player B bids 25. This means Player A gets to play the ...


2

I would agree that the Rogue is the weakest class, although I don't have hard data to back that up. The reasoning is simple: she needs the same treasure count as the cleric, but is weaker in combat. Their special power to pass secret doors is a very poor compensation, not least because it's unreliable, and is easily copied with a secret door card. The ...


2

I played this game intensely a few years ago with 2 and 3 players (sometimes up to 4) and the analysy-paralysis problem disappeared after, say, 2-3 games with the same group. I tried the same solution of lowering to 7 buildings (in fact, it is even suggested on the rulebook) and worked quite well for 2 players, never tried it with 3-4 players. I personally ...


2

We have looked at this game critically and found that we agree with your assessment that there is too much luck. Furthermore, the penalties and rewards for that luck are too extreme the way the rules were written. DISCLAIMER: If you love Monopoly please stop reading this, you will love Boxcars. If you like games of strategy and planning, please continue ...


2

I found some "ways to play" on the Story Cubes website. Some just involve getting more or other dice, but some are actually just house rules, or alternate rules. I will be trying some of them out. Some of those are little more than showcases / advertisements for different sets, but a couple of them are quite useful. #4 Superheroes Each person roles 3 ...


1

I agree with ikegami's comment that (strategic) decisions can mostly be made before one's turn actually starts (i.e. during other players' turns). There is some interaction that may influence one's decision (esp. if one rolls into a massive resource influx on one's turn that suddenly enables many different actions that weren't previously considered), but ...


1

One option would be to play for less points. The first to 7 or 8 wins.



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