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43

My friend and I have used the following and we think they work pretty well. Start with a lower life total. Start yourself off at 10 or 15. As the kids get better, slowly increase it until you are back at 20. Remind the kids about all their triggers or abilities they should be using. Especially when learning, having someone remind you to activate a ...


20

How complex are your decks? For teaching kids, you want simple decks: big green fatties, red burn, blue fliers, black removal, white weenies, etc. Most of the time when I want to handicap myself, I intentionally use a weaker deck against a stronger deck. You could also keep a cheat sheet of the phases of a turn, so that they make sure to go through all ...


14

This is not an official rule; that is why you didn't find it in the rule book. The reason this isn't a rule is because it would detrimental to the game experience. The player with the 'largest army' has already moved the Robber at least three times and has 2 victory points. Giving the player the power to move the Robber each turn, without a roll or playing ...


12

There's two schools of thought on this subject - one is that you can do anything unless the rules say you can't, the other is that you can only do what the rules say you can. I believe there's a better argument for the second case, because the rules are generally written to define the game, and can't expressly prohibit everything you might try to do. The ...


12

The goal in TTR is not "complete the cards you're given", it's "get the most points". There are plenty of ways to do this with short routes (e.g. by focusing on building only length 4+, not going for longest route, and picking the spots where everyone wants to go). If no one in your group wants to adjust their play style to match the cards they're dealt, ...


11

Of course this can happen, but the expectation is that all the players help contribute to finding solutions to the current problems. While you might see one path, someone else might see another, that happens to be better. Having multiple people working on the same problem from different perspectives generally provides better results. Kind of like crowd ...


10

No, this is not a rule. There's no rule I could quote to prove this, but as you say, the rulebook doesn't mention it. The rulebook says when you CAN move the robber (when playing a KnightS/Soldier or when rolling a 7), but doesn't list all the different times that you CAN'T. It must have just been a house rule; Catan has all sorts of house rules people ...


9

For my suggestion of a house rule to use, please see the section of this answer titled "Embargo Counters". If I understand correctly, you were learning the game naturally by playing it - it's just that at the current stage of learning it you have got to, it isn't very interesting, which makes it harder than it has been to carry on learning it simply by ...


7

I disagree that the player who draws the longest routes has an advantage. A winning play in Ticket to Ride (TTR) doesn't boil down simply to that. Here are a few reasons why I don't think changing the rules is necessary (according to my many many TTR games played): Many games can be won by completing only small routes, and by using connections that are ...


7

We have played 2-3 times a month for a long time. Of course games are shorter with fewer people and go faster when everyone is well acquainted with the game. We have played normal extended version games in about an hour with 3 people. We recently added a column of property spaces on each town to extend play - you could remove a column to shorten play. ...


7

Play it more often. I finish two-player games with an expert friend in about 50 minutes, after having played a lot over the Internet and live. As you start learning the buildings and understand the two fundamental strategies of the game, i.e., building vs shipping, you'll start realizing your chances faster. There are a lot of house rules you can apply to ...


7

The closest thing to an official recommendation is a gimmick format from the Invitational, called "Auction." Players would bid for decks they wanted by offering to play them with reduced starting life and hand size. To avoid deviating too much from the game's standard parameters, you can mix penalties for the stronger player with bonuses for the weaker ...


6

I think you have to understand the game sufficiently to gauge whether the information really is secret or not. For games where information isn't secret due to being calculatable, it sounds like a good, sporting house rule to instead play openly rather than punishing less acute players. Good etiquette would mean communicating why you wish to invoke this ...


6

I think the best house rules here are going to be the ones which don't actually change mechanics of the game, and which encourage or at least allow you to play well, i.e. ones that are consistent with the better than big money strategies with most sets of kingdom cards. That way as you continue to get better at the game under your house rules, everything ...


6

The game already supports this with improvements like Pottery, which converts clay to food. Clearly, the imagined implication isn't that suddenly your family has a fulfilling case of pica — it's that the clay is used to make some good which can be exchanged for food (and that's abstracted away). Imagine something similar for animals in the game, and there ...


6

Not everyone feels the way you do. Agricola is rated #7 on BoardGameGeek seven years after it was released. Agricola is rated as "Medium-Heavy" on BGG with a 3.6 rating out of 5 which means that most people see it as among the more complex games they've played. If you enjoy the family game, there's nothing wrong with just playing that. Without knowing ...


5

I'll take the other side here. Keeping private notes is always ok (unless the rules specifically forbid it.) When I'm playing a game like Settlers of Catan, I can keep track of what other players have in their hands without too much difficulty. Am I acting against the rules by simply remembering what's happened so far? Using a piece of scrap paper to ...


5

Mixing Fluxx sets is fun, but it will: probably make the games take longer since you have half as much chance of getting a relevant keeper. The more sets you add the lower the chances of getting the card you want will be. With 3 decks your chances are 1/3. With 4 decks your chances are 1/4. And so on. [Thanks to @SocioMatt for encouraging this ...


5

Try using lower power level decks. As an idea, maybe you would want to only build a common only deck for yourself or build decks around bad rares. Another suggestion is to try playing archenemy but without archenemy (scheme) cards. Archenemy is a 1 vs many (about 2-4) where the 1 starts with 40 life and the many all take their turn together (like in two ...


5

Rules are important Do not do things abnormal to the comprehensive rules. This runs the risks of creating bad habits or an expectation of leniency when they start playing with others. Allow their deck to be naturally random, as this is a concept that will accost them through out their time playing; softening it may ease their entry, but it establish road ...


4

It's against the rules. The rules call for playing with the cards kept secret, but tracking everyone's resources on paper would be virtually no different than playing with all cards revealed. It makes the game less enjoyable. It slows the game down. It leads to "what did I miss" type questions. It takes your attention away from players, reducing social ...


4

I think you shouldn't limit the possible actions by removing the money, but you could try to somehow devalue money cards. One way to do this would be to give money cards a negative victory point value, like copper -1, silver -3, gold -6 victory points. You would both start the game with -7 victory points obviously, but it doesn't really matter. For a weaker ...


4

The rules seem very explicit. "The captain turns his over and carries out the two actions" "In turn, the other players do the same: they turn over their card and carry out the two actions" I can't comment on what the effect of your house rule would be, but it clearly is not the intended way to play.


4

That doesn't sound too bad, except that the drawn cards could be really off. Alternatively, you could try to play a cooperative variant. These two are interesting: The game is cooperative. Each player is the storyteller five times for a total of 10 turns and you go for a high score. The highest possible is 70. Neither player has a hand. Each ...


4

A quick Google web search reveals this post for the Easter Festival (yes, it's the same author although a different name). The full rules for both expansions can be found in the downloads sections of Carcassonne Central (you'll need to register, but it's free to do so). Easter Festival - Rules Easter Festival - Tiles City Gates Rules - English translation ...


4

It sounds like you're describing Fox and Hounds here: The four Hounds can only move forward diagonally. The Fox can move forward or backwards diagonally. There is no jumping or capturing involved; the Hounds win when the Fox can't make any legal moves, and the Fox wins if it reaches the far rank (where the Hounds started). This game is inherently ...


4

The problem with your suggested solution is that it increases the impact of good luck for everyone. The result is that everyone's potential score will be that much higher, so the winner will end up being the person who doesn't get screwed out of routes by other players. As you say, getting lucky with grouped routes does have an impact on the game, and no ...


3

Among people you don't know as well or don't know at all (the key here is familiarity, not exactly what you stated at the end of your question about people you don't see regularly per se), it's typically safe to fall back to the assumption that games are played more socially and less competitively. You can imagine any number of brutal or brilliant ...


3

I'm glad you enjoy this aspect of Hex, but the poorly-written rules and bountiful edge-cases are, in my opinion, maddening :). If I'd been there I'd have argued that "Level" would have worked for him in this situation but only if he had no other cards in his hand that would have been legal plays. Since he had "Turn-aside-right" then "Level" doesn't work ...


3

I play with a large group of people (5+) when we play Planechase, and we have a runnning rule: after 2 null rolls, you flip a coin and call it for either planar or chaos. While it assures an eventual result for spending the mana, it also limits the ability to spend it freely to achieve a result by placing a 50% chance at the end, which can be devastating. ...



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