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2

In my particular view, there are two kinds of information in games. Hidden, and Known. Things which are hidden you do not know, and methods of gaining that information are limited to whatever rules the game supplies. Things which are known, you already know. Nobody would claim that it is unethical to remember that which you know. Further, outside of ...


1

My recommendation would be to switch the seating every few turns/times around the table. Not so often that it slows down the game, but just enough that nobody sits next to the less experienced player for a time that would give them a major advantage. Just my opinion on the topic.


0

I believe the propriety depends on what the other players are doing and what you've agreed upon beforehand. If the other players appear to emphasize quick play and thinking intuitively, then do it; if one or two are obviously mathing everything out and slowing the game to an extremely deliberate pace, then follow to give yourself a level playing ground. ...


3

Among people you don't know as well or don't know at all (the key here is familiarity, not exactly what you stated at the end of your question about people you don't see regularly per se), it's typically safe to fall back to the assumption that games are played more socially and less competitively. You can imagine any number of brutal or brilliant ...


5

I'll take the other side here. Keeping private notes is always ok (unless the rules specifically forbid it.) When I'm playing a game like Settlers of Catan, I can keep track of what other players have in their hands without too much difficulty. Am I acting against the rules by simply remembering what's happened so far? Using a piece of scrap paper to ...


1

In situations where certain information would be available perfectly to an observant player, little would be generally gained by allowing all players to keep records of such information which would not equally be gained by having the information continually public. There are, however, at least two situations where allowing personal record-keeping might be ...


4

It's against the rules. The rules call for playing with the cards kept secret, but tracking everyone's resources on paper would be virtually no different than playing with all cards revealed. It makes the game less enjoyable. It slows the game down. It leads to "what did I miss" type questions. It takes your attention away from players, reducing social ...


6

I think you have to understand the game sufficiently to gauge whether the information really is secret or not. For games where information isn't secret due to being calculatable, it sounds like a good, sporting house rule to instead play openly rather than punishing less acute players. Good etiquette would mean communicating why you wish to invoke this ...


1

In the general case, I would say writing down semi-secret information is definitely frowned on. You're giving yourself a competitive advantage over others, unless they are willing to put in the same amount of effort, which will be upsetting to a lot of players that are trying to focus more on enjoying the game than winning at all costs. These players don't ...


11

There's two schools of thought on this subject - one is that you can do anything unless the rules say you can't, the other is that you can only do what the rules say you can. I believe there's a better argument for the second case, because the rules are generally written to define the game, and can't expressly prohibit everything you might try to do. The ...


1

Of course. Warhammer (especially with house rules) is all about figuring out what you can do. Alliances are common, and you can find an alliance matrix in the rule book. More than 3 armies in anything below 1750 pts. (about £400 worth of models) is nigh on impossible, but only if you play by the GW rules. If you wanted to play in tournaments, then you would ...


3

This might be slightly beyond the scope of what you want, but if you're looking for interesting map layouts, there are a bunch at www.catanmaps.com Most of them are meant to be challenging, and most of them require the Seafarers expansion. http://www.catanmaps.com/


1

Usually when I play people want to be the traitor, but possibly that's just my friends. There are a few simple things you can do to reduce the chances of a particular player always being the traitor: Play with more people. In a 3 player game you're much more likely to be the traitor than in a 6 player game. For some haunts the traitor is the player with ...


-2

A "trade" according to the official rules of Catan, is strictly a resource for a resource. A trade of X resource for X influence is against the rules plain and simple. Not sure why this concept is difficult understand for some people. If house rules dictate otherwise, then its whatever.


0

After throughly reading the rules there are some simple house rules I have come up with that would limit luck and increase overall game strategy. Starting Train has a movement of six spaces each turn. Express moves eight each turn. Super Chief moves at twelve each turn. (Optional) Maintenance fees for trains; role two dice. Starting Train: if double 1s ...


2

Note that the following assumes that all players are playing a perfect game with no mistakes. In real games every player will make occasional mistakes so take what I'm about to say with a grain of salt. For the details on optimal play check out http://donsessays.freeservers.com/ The Russia first turn restriction does nothing to change the balance of classic ...



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