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14

The most unstable situation is adjacent middle blocks, and in general, instabilities near the bottom of the stack are more likely to cause the tower to fall than those at the top because of the greater weight of blocks being held up by the rickety base and because of the longer moment arm. However, it's not quite as simple as setting up a ...


11

You make the stack (without using the insert). You put the cardboard insert over the stack, with the horizontal bit on top, and push all the blocks into the insert to make sure they're all straight. You take the insert off and start playing.


8

It is not necessarily any player's turn, but Player A would win. Not because player B caused the tower to topple - he didn't. But according to the rules: Your turn ends 10 seconds after you stack your block - or as soon as the player to your left touches one. and If you're the last player to stack a block without toppling the tower, you win!" ...


8

According to the official 2000 version of the rules: As play proceeds and the weight of the tower shifts, some blocks become looser than others and are easier to remove. You can touch other blocks to find a loose one — but if you move a block out of place, you must fix it (using one hand only) before touching another block. Since this rule includes the ...


8

If you are very dexterous, and are playing with players that are also very dexterous, realize that the math of your choices can determine who wins. Each level can have either 1 or 2 removed from it. Try to leave your opponent(s) in a situation where they have no possible moves. For example, if there is 1 full level, and 1 level with the middle and 1 ...


6

I do not believe that the block dimensions vary much, except because of manufacturing error. The Wikipedia page states that the blocks are: Each block is three times as long as its width, and one fifth as thick as its length 1.5×2.5×7.5 cm (0.59×0.98×3.0 in). And the official website states: A classic Jenga game consists of 54 precision-crafted, ...


6

The official Jenga rules from 2000, which are printed on Hasbro's website, have this to say about setup: SETUP Empty the blocks onto a flat surface One person uses this loading tray to build up the tower by placing layers of three wooden blocks at right angles to each other. (See photo on package back.) When you finish, you'll have a solid, ...


5

Jenga, as designed, is most certainly a competitive game. The rules released with the game have stayed consistent over the years and have never described how to play in a cooperative manner. Most versions of the rules (such as the 2000 version) have a "Solo Play" variant that might also be able to be played cooperatively with multiple players: Play ...


5

The rules on Hasbro's site say that you can touch other blocks with a single hand, and you must complete a 3 block story. I don't see why it would be unacceptable to either fix the top story with your hand directly to accept a third block, or nudge the top blocks in place with a block in your hand to complete the story. Clearly, if you are required to make a ...


4

Welcome to StackExchange! You must complete each layer before starting a new one (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jenga#Rules) Only one hand at a time may be used to remove a block; both hands can be used, but only one hand may be on the tower at a time. (see the rules at BoardGameGeek.com)


4

I always build it upside down. So you put the cardboard retainer at the bottom, then build the tower. Finally, you slowly flip the tower using the retainer to keep everything in place. This doesn't work well for everyone, but it's how I learned to do it as a kid.


3

According the the 2008 Vintage Game Collection version of Jenga, the tallest recorded Jenga tower was made by Robert Grebler in 1985 with a tower 40 2⁄3 levels*, using an original Jenga set produced by Leslie Scott, the designer of the game. Board Game Geek's gallery for Jenga includes a picture that nearly matches this at 40 levels tall. The user Romir ...


3

The inventor of Jenga actually mentioned this fact on a podcast called How to Do Everything in August of 2015. https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/how-to-do-everything/id420543296?mt=2&i=349678276 The trick is that the blocks are of slightly different thicknesses.


2

First off: nothing is "exact." I mean literally nothing. Even if the machine is set to be exact...it probably is... hardwood (yes, it is a compound word) will vary because it is a natural thing. Every piece absorbs moisture at a slightly different rate and has natural variations. Even if they were made of aluminum, nothing is exact and there will be ...


2

Having slept on this issue (sleeping on Jenga - ouch) I've decided to change my previous answer. The rules state you must "stack the block on top of the tower at right angles to the blocks just below it". I would contend that "stack" does not simply mean "place" - or else the rules would have used that word. Looking up a definition of "to stack", you will ...


2

Simple, you set the guide on its side and fill it with blocks. Afterwards, it's just a simple matter of lifting one side so that it's right-side up. I base this answer on the fact that the guide is placed as such in all the JENGA boxes that I have ever played with.


1

From the rules: Your turn ends 10 seconds after you stack your block - or as soon as the player to your left touches one. So in your example the tower has fallen during Player B's turn.



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