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23

Well, I personally suffered from this condition for a long time---and still do to some extent. In my opinion, the ability to lose gracefully is dependent on one's self esteem. It is much easier to shrug off a defeat if your self esteem is secure than when your whole life is a battle for every scrap of validation. With age (I'd say 20+) it does get easier to ...


19

Example is critical. Lose to the child gracefully yourself. Teach them by example to say thanks for the game when they win. (Graceful winning is the flip side of graceful losing, and I always found it much harder to do; I like gloating, dammit. I have to consciously suppress that.) And, importantly, demonstrate that it's to the child's benefit to lose ...


17

I highly suggest taking him through the puzzles in Polgar's book. The book starts off with very simple chess problems, with only a handful of pieces, with the idea of "solve for checkmate in x moves". The problems are designed with a logical progression, highlighting specific tactics and strategies, and become increasingly complex and demonstrating more ...


14

Patience is the only thing I can think of, with my kids (aged 6) I started by fanning them out and place them in their hands finished, lately they collect them and take a grip and I only fan them out for them. As an alternative just buy a couple of Playing Card Holders and worry about it later on :) These should be available a little everywhere but the ...


13

Group the players according to skill level. Each of your words are eliminated if anybody in your group or below has a duplicate word. Players in groups higher than yours cannot eliminate your words, but you can eliminate theirs. I think there should be at least two players in the lowest group, but maybe you want to be really kind to the most junior player. ...


12

You could use different scoring for the kids and the adults. The normal scoring is Word length 3 4 5 6 7 8+ Points 1 1 2 3 5 11 For the less skilled players, you could try something more like Word length 3 4 5 6 7 8+ Points 2 3 4 6 10 15 which increases the reward for finding any words not found by the veteran players, and gives huge bonuses ...


11

Here's what I did - though it may be too late for some: I never, ever just let my son win while he was growing up. This was not always easy. For a while, for example, I could always count on him to side with his mother when we played A Game of Thrones. It was OK, she was going to win anyhow. Sometimes, he would score a win - usually in luck based games - ...


10

I think you should teach them as soon as they're old enough that they won't eat the stones. One thing you have to watch out for with really young players is that they will focus too much on capturing, and you have to try not to encourage that. I started teaching my daughter when she was five, and she's surprisingly good at reading. Unfortunately she ...


9

There are a variety of ways to level the playing field in chess. The two most common methods are material advantage and time odds, although there are also a number of more exotic handicaps that one can conceive of (e.g. giving away free moves, requiring a given piece to give checkmate, allowing the King to move two squares, etc). With material handicaps, ...


9

You could require the more experienced players to find words with a minimum number of letters. Like, they need at least 5 letters in the word to count? Or, the younger players could be given additional time.


9

Yours is a good idea: introduce him to the pieces gradually (though not too gradually - five-year olds learn fast!). Here's another one: to make sure the rules of moving stick, place a piece on the empty board before each game, and ask him to point out all the spaces that piece can move to. After he's got that down (a few days/weeks, depending on how often ...


7

Neither of my children liked to lose but for very different reasons. I used very different strategies to help each of them through it. My eldest took losing as an affront. It challenged his self-image. I followed the strategy of "always play my best" and by the time he was 7 or 8, he was beating me of his own accord and taking enormous delight from it. He ...


6

My wife kicks serious butt at Boggle, so much so that I don't like playing with her anymore. I asked her this question, and without hesitating, she said "Either give the kids double the time, or the adults half the time". I may have to try this with her at some point (with me receiving the handicap) :D


6

I have the answer! You will need to purchase some Pringles, or something else that comes in plastic-lidded cylindrical cans like that. Take two lids and punch a hole in the center of them Put the lids top-to-top and use a brass brad through the hole to hold them together Now you can put the kids' cards in them - face down and you're not even peeking! ...


5

When I was teaching my cousin, I started out by explaining the rules for capture and the strategies of territory. We started out in a 9x9 area so she could get a feel for the rules without feeling overwhelmed by the size of the board. After a few games we decided to move to the full 19x19 play area. I let her play as she pleased for most of the game. ...


5

When I was a kid, I would put my cards on a chair beside me. That way my parents couldn't see them, but I didn't have to hold them.


5

As an alternative to Don's pretty comprehensive solution: Have you considered playing some games with the hands 'open' (the cards showing, usually inevitably spread on the table)? Although this removes a large chunk of the strategy in most games (which may well be beyond them initially), it will give them a chance to look at their opponent's hands and ...


5

Collaborative games (especially Pandemic, since it's quick and easy to teach) come immediately to mind. The thing is, it can teach you how to accept collective failure, but I'm not certain it has a lot to do with losing to another human being (especially a relative, with all the emotional weight they carry) in a child's mind. I know a grown up (not the most ...


5

I would say... type of game, number of players, etc... are all factors... but being a "good loser" is a learned trait. You want to train him to be a good sport? Make sure he plays with respectful people. Other answers are all and good... but the best way to encourage good behavior is to encourage good atmosphere. You stick your kid into a Halo server... ...


4

I'm not sure, but maybe playing games in partnerships or teams would lessen the sting of losing. Perhaps a mixture of cooperative and competitive games would also help. Any game where players can exclude an unpleasant player from deals or trading might be effective in letting a child see the consequences. However, it would have to be done very delicately ...


3

Found it! It's name is "Ghost Hunters!" by Brian Lee and it's not a board game but a book, published for the first time in UK by Tango Books in 1998. ISBN (for Italian edition) is 88-450-7851-5, and you can see it online at http://www.lafeltrinelli.it/products/9788845107351/Gioca_con_gli_acchiappafantasmi/Lee_Brian.html


3

I am teaching an 8-year-old right now. He is so competitive that he was immediately addicted. We play with all the pieces. I think this is fine because he wants to feel he's being challenged and playing like an adult. When he wants to move a piece, and isn't sure what his legal moves are, he just asks me, and we talk through which moves are a good idea and ...


3

In my experience, kids like the colorful names for shapes, especially animal names like "tiger's mouth" and "dog's head". If you want a kid to be happy about continued Go experience, do your best to make sure they're having fun. I'm not saying necessarily that you should let them win, but if you don't make sure they're having fun even when losing! Hint, ...


2

I was going to say CandyLand and Chutes and Ladders, because as annoying as they are they are still a huge hit with my 4 year old. I am hoping that she will soon be old enough for Catan Junior! She already wants to play Catan with Mama.


1

My experience with Legends of Andor is that it is primarily a "puzzle". Time is very limited, and you need to be very strategic about what actions you take in order to succeed. I don't think most 5 year olds will have this level of analytic thinking yet. So while your daughter can probably learn the available decisions and be able to choose ones she ...


1

At that age they will have a bit of trouble just figuring out how pieces move. It will take a few games for them to remember it. In games with kids that are too young to quickly grasp how pieces move I simply make sure that on nearly every move I have a piece available for them to take (for free), and the problem I pose to them is which piece they can take ...


1

Chess (as any other complex system) consists of: 1) Parts(pieces), 2) Interrelationships between them, 3) Goal/purpose. Seeing these interrelations and understanding roles/functions pieces have when interconnected is the most critical skill to acquire early. The same way as a QB must develop a great field vision with the ability to quickly scan the field ...


1

Go get Emanuel Lasker's Manual of Chess (there is a modern version with modern notation). It is an old book and definitely as a full book too detailed for a 5 year old, but the structure it offers to teach chess would be a very solid one for you to use with your son. In particular it does a bit of what others have suggested but in a more formalized manner - ...



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