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17

No. The trigger, "Whenever ~ attacks" means "Whenever ~ is declared as an attacking creature". A creature with double strike will deal damage in the two combat damage steps, but will only be declared as an attacker once per turn. (Normally, unless some other effect is creating additional combat phases.)


16

Your opponent was correct. Only creatures controlled by the defending player may be declared as blockers. "Control" doesn't just mean "you decide what it does", it means you control it just like all your other creatures. It's on your side of the battlefield now (temporarily). But there are still an awful lot of nasty things you can do with a card like ...


15

Summoning Sickness "Summoning Sickness" is simply the name for rule 302.6: A creature's activated ability with the tap symbol [{T}] or the untap symbol [{Q}] in its activation cost can't be activated unless the creature has been under its controller's control continuously since his or her most recent turn began. A creature can't attack unless it has ...


14

It will be killed. All damage done to the creature in most cases stays until the very end of the turn (cleanup step). 119.6. Damage marked on a creature remains until the cleanup step, even if that permanent stops being a creature. If the total damage marked on a creature is greater than or equal to its toughness, that creature has been dealt lethal ...


11

Indestructible prevents the permanent from being destroyed. This usually is caused by damage exceeding a creature's toughness, or an effect that explicitly says that it will destroy a permanent. The main ways that a creature with indestructible will die (being put to the graveyard from the battlefield) will be: Having its toughness reduced to zero. ...


10

There are two main reasons for this way of doing it, one mechanics based, and one flavor based. The mechanical reason is that if they just transformed they would need to have additional text to put the loyalty counters on them, whereas if they exile then enter transformed they enter with the appropriate number of loyalty counters. The flavor reason is it ...


10

I know the Dragonrage's affect will trigger Heroic... Actually, it doesn't. The word "target" doesn't appear anywhere on Dragonrage, and it's not an aura, so it doesn't target, and so it doesn't trigger heroic. As an alternative example, Dragon Mantle is an aura, so it does trigger heroic when you initially cast it. the "R: This creature gains ...


9

You cannot cast a spell without choosing all specified targets. In the process of casting a spell, we have these rules 601.2. To cast a spell is to take it from where it is (usually the hand), put it on the stack, and pay its costs, so that it will eventually resolve and have its effect. Casting a spell follows the steps listed below, in order. If, at ...


9

Yes, you are allowed to use Gustcloak Savior's ability to remove an attacking creature from combat, even if it is not tapped. Gustcloak Savior's ability is a triggered ability, that triggers in your Declare Blockers step for each of your attacking creatures that have become blocked. Then, when the ability resolves, it lets you choose whether to have the ...


9

The only restriction is that you have to do it before the End of Combat step, so you can do it after damage is dealt. When Kytheon's ability says "if Kytheon, Hero of Akros attacked..." it means "if this creature attacked...". Specifically, rule 201.4 says Text that refers to the object it's on by name means just that particular object and not any other ...


9

You have to be able to uniquely identify the card, you don't necessarily have to get the name correct. The reason for this is while the Comprehensive Rules say you have to actually name the card (CR 201.3), the Tournament Rules state that you can get the Oracle text of the card (which includes the name) as long as you can uniquely identify it (MTR 3.6). In ...


8

The Basic Rulebook answers this question. permanent—Lands, creatures, artifacts, enchantments, and planeswalkers are permanents. They enter the battlefield after you cast them. Token creatures are also permanents. Instants and sorceries are not permanents. They go to the graveyard after they resolve.


8

The Magic: the Gathering Tournament Rules (MTR) makes it clear that a judge should not intervene before a rule has been broken, but should intervene after a rule has been broken. In other words, a judge should be reactive, not proactive. Judges do not intervene in a game to prevent illegal actions, but do intervene as soon as a rule has been broken or to ...


8

As Ikegami mentioned in a comment, the answer is no. Double strike (as well as first strike) adds an additional combat damage step where creatures with double (or first) strike deal their damage. Creatures that die as a result of this damage will be removed from combat before the second combat damage step happens. So the order of things is: Declare ...


8

Summoning sickness applies to all creatures without haste, regardless of how they came to be. From the comprehensive rules: 302.6. A creature’s activated ability with the tap symbol or the untap symbol in its activation cost can’t be activated unless the creature has been under its controller’s control continuously since his or her most recent turn ...


8

You cannot Stifle Heritage Druid's ability since it is what is called a mana ability 605.1a An activated ability is a mana ability if it meets all of the following criteria: it doesn’t have a target, it could put mana into a player’s mana pool when it resolves, and it’s not a loyalty ability 605.3b An activated mana ability doesn’t go on the stack, ...


8

The ability is a triggered ability, so they both trigger when the third player sacrifices a creature. Whichever one is on top of the stack resolves first, and puts the creature into play under that player's control. Then the other one resolves, but can't find the creature card in the graveyard, so it does nothing. It That Betrays' ability is a ...


7

A permanent is any card or token on the battlefield. This includes lands, creatures, artifacts, enchantments, and planeswalkers. Note that they have to actually be on the battlefield to be permanents. For example, a creature card on the battlefield is a permanent, though it's usually just referred to as a creature - the "permanent is implied". If it's on ...


7

Yes, the ability was still activated even if it gets countered. Activating the ability is merely the process of paying its costs and putting it onto the stack, completely independent of what happens after that: 602.2. To activate an ability is to put it onto the stack and pay its costs, so that it will eventually resolve and have its effect. ... All ...


7

Instants and sorceries would stay in the zone they're currently in, in your case in Exile. They do nothing. 304.4. Instants can’t enter the battlefield. If an instant would enter the battlefield, it remains in its previous zone instead. 307.4. Sorceries can’t enter the battlefield. If a sorcery would enter the battlefield, it remains in its previous ...


7

The Artifact Creature would lose haste if the Engineer was destroyed because it is a continuous effect from a static ability whose source has disappeared. As you mentioned, this means the creature will be unable to attack this turn. The one difference in your two scenarios is that in the second one, if the Artifact Creature had an activated ability with the ...


6

No, that is not correct. Rule 506.4 says A permanent is removed from combat if it leaves the battlefield, if its controller changes, if it phases out, if an effect specifically removes it from combat, if it's a planeswalker that's being attacked and stops being a planeswalker, or if it's an attacking or blocking creature that regenerates (see rule ...


6

If both players can't verify which cards were drawn that turn any unverified cards cannot be returned to the top of the library with Sylvan Library. If you think you might be playing a Library with Flash be sure to keep track of which cards you have drawn that turn. From the Magic Judge Rules Blog: Here’s the Official ruling that has been handed down ...


6

You don't need to pay mana to attack unless a card specifically says so. So, if you take control of a black creature using a white deck, you can attack with that creature.


6

No. Declaring a creature to attack only happens once per combat phase, no matter how often it deals combat damage. There are some cards that grant you additional combat phases. A creature with Double Strike would only trigger "on dealing (combat) damage" triggers twice.


6

If you want to start with a core set, Magic Origins is fine to buy - it's going to be in standard another 18 months. The changes are all in the future: no more core sets after this one, two-set blocks, changed rotation schedule. But that doesn't change that Magic Origins is here now! Even if nothing were changing, it'd still be another year until the next ...


6

Yes you can, in this case 'another creature' means a creature other than Blood Host, not a creature that you haven't sacrificed before. Even if that weren't the case once it move from the battlefield to the graveyard the first time the game no longer sees it as the same creature. 400.7. An object that moves from one zone to another becomes a new object ...


6

Toughness never gets used up. Damage doesn't change toughness (or power), and it doesn't use counters, it's simply marked on creatures. If a creature ends up marked with damage greater than or equal to its toughness, it dies. But the whole time, the creature still has its original toughness. You probably shouldn't even think of it as having its toughness ...


5

Not only are you allowed to share cards, you are as a team considered to have a single card pool that you build your decks from. Section 9.6 of the Tournament rules says Two-Headed Giant Limited Rules All the rules for Limited Tournaments (Section 7) apply, except as described below. The DCI recommends that each team receive eight boosters per ...


5

Are you forced to play both abilities when you cast the spell? Yes. Unless there are qualifiers ("may"/"up to" are popular ones), you must resolve all of a spell's effects. Is that because those are spell abilities, whereas in the first example above they are activated abilities? Not quite. It is because you are never forced to activate (pay the ...



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