Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

27

Lands (any permanent, really) can have +1/+1 counters just fine. In fact, Llanowar Reborn enters the battlefield with one! The counter(s) will not go away just because your blinkmoth stops being a creature. Of course, the +1/+1 counter doesn't do anything until the land becomes a creature again, but the +1/+1 counter will still be there.


23

No, that doesn't amount to an infinite loop, because of this term in cipher's definition: Whenever that creature deals combat damage to a player [...] (That's an extract from the reminder text, but the actual rules definition is virtually identical.) Combat damage is just the damage dealt during the combat damage step. In other words, it's the damage ...


23

There is no between turns; the end of one turn transitions immediately to the beginning of the next. The last time you can definitely activate abilities and play instants is during your opponent's End Step, which is after their second main phase. The end step is is followed by the cleanup step (the last step of the turn), when players usually do not gain ...


22

The full card text is: You don't lose the game for having 0 or less life. As long as you have 0 or less life, all damage is dealt to you as though its source had infect. (Damage is dealt to you in the form of poison counters.) If you have ten poison counters, you lose the game. You just need to get your opponent to zero, then deal ten more damage ...


21

The question is partially answered in the article 25 Random Things About Magic: Magic was almost not called Magic. In fact, when the first solicitation for the game was sent out the game was called Mana Clash. The reason for this is as follows. Richard (Garfield, of course) called the game Magic when he originally designed it. All through the original ...


20

When the opponents gets a chance to cast Terror, the Goblin has already been sacrificed as part of the cost to cast Goblin Grenade. It's not available to be targetted by Terror. Additional costs are part of the total cost to cast a spell or activate an ability. To paraphrase 601.2e, total cost = mana cost or alternative cost + cost increases and ...


18

The game will be a draw. Darksteel Reactor will trigger, attempt to win you the game, and then resolve and do nothing (since you can't win the game). Once resolved, Darksteel Reactor will see that it is still in play and still has 20 counters, and it will trigger again. 603.8. A state-triggered ability doesn't trigger again until the ability has ...


18

Strategies for mono-black against enchantments Targeted discard The best black cards against enchantments are targeted discard spells. Targeted discard lets you deal with practically any card before it hits the battlefield. Getting the most out of them may require some finesse (here is THE guide on that subject.), but these cards are powerful tools ...


18

If I understand the situation you are describing correctly it is as follows: A player at 2 life casts Sphinx's Revelation with X = 2. this is put on the stack. His opponent responds by casting Warleader's Helix The initial player in turn responds by casting Sphinx's Revelation with X=1 Both players pass priority until the stack is resolved or some other ...


17

The short answer is that no matter what your opponent does with their Trapper, they cannot prevent you from activating your Wellwisher and gaining the life. The long answer involves explaining some of the key systems in the Magic rules. Magic resolves spells and abilities using a system called "the stack". When you cast a spell or ability, it goes on top ...


17

Mostly no, but it depends. First, here's a relevant quote from the tournament rules (section 2.7): Generally, decklists are not public information and are not shared with other players during a tournament. At constructed-format, Professional REL tournaments (Pro Tour, World Magic Cup, Magic: The Gathering World Championship, and Grand Prix), ...


16

The Quag Sickness cannot be returned to the battlefield enchanting the White Knight. The relevant rule about Protection, 702.16c, says A permanent or player with protection can’t be enchanted by Auras that have the stated quality. and the relevant rule about Auras, 303.4f, says If an Aura is entering the battlefield under a player’s control by any ...


16

Yes, he can attach then, and yes, this does circumvent Ensnaring Bridge. Only the 'equip' ability is restricted to sorcery speed. The '{B}{B}: Attach Cranial Plating to target creature you control.' ability can be used anytime you have priority. That's why it's more expensive to use even though it has the same effect as Equip. Since the creature has ...


16

No, this does not work. Exchanging control using Chimera's ability sets up a continuous effect; the same as the one created by Hypnotic Siren (or Mind Control, etc). When there are multiple effects that are applied in the same layer, they are all applied in timestamp order. This means that because the Chimera's ability resolved after the Siren's ability, ...


16

Yes, it's of course against the rules: 705.3. A coin used in a flip must be a two-sided object with easily distinguished sides and equal likelihood that either side lands face up. If the coin that’s being flipped doesn’t have an obvious “heads” or “tails,” designate one side to be “heads,” and the other side to be “tails.” Other methods of randomization ...


15

You cannot sacrifice a creature you do not control. The rule on sacrifice, 701.14a says To sacrifice a permanent, its controller moves it from the battlefield directly to its owner’s graveyard. A player can’t sacrifice something that isn’t a permanent, or something that’s a permanent he or she doesn’t control. Sacrificing a permanent doesn’t destroy it, ...


15

Welding Jar can target itself. When you cast a spell or activate an ability, you choose targets (601.2c) before paying costs (601.2g). So the Welding Jar is still on the battlefield when it's time to choose targets, and is a valid target for its own ability. That ability will fizzle, of course, since you've already put Welding Jar in the graveyard by the ...


15

This question is hypothetical and not covered by the rules. All current cards which cause a creature to lose all abilities also set the power/toughness of the creature, or cause it to no longer be a creature making the power/toughness irrelevant. It's a safe bet that loses all abilities cards are designed that way to avoid this conundrum.


15

Standard rotates once a year, in the fall. New cards printed in a core set or expansion set stay in Standard for between one to two years after their printing. Currently, the normal set release schedule is: One block (like Theros) on a yearly cycle: one sets each for fall, winter, and spring. One core set (like M14) each summer. A couple of specialty ...


15

When there are more than two players/teams. 103.7a In a two-player game, the player who plays first skips the draw step (see rule 504, “Draw Step”) of his or her first turn. 103.7b In a Two-Headed Giant game, the team who plays first skips the draw step of their first turn. 103.7c In all other multiplayer games, no player skips the draw step of ...


15

First of all, as the other answers have indicated, Scalding Tarn does not produce any mana, it just lets you search for another land that can. The colors on this card have absolutely nothing to do with its ability. The blue and red are just there as a visual reminder that the ability lets you search for an Island or a Mountain. The card could be orange, or ...


14

Unfortunately your understanding is incorrect. Your 5/5 Ghor-Clan Rampager with trample and double strike will be declared as an attacker, then all creatures able to block it must do so. Your opponent will declare their 2 creatures as blockers, and you will subsequently choose the order in which your ghor-clan rampager will deal its damage to those blocking ...


14

Look at it this way: If you properly randomize your deck, then its initial configuration is irrelevant. So "mana weaving" is just wasting more productive time. If you don't properly randomize your deck, then "mana weaving" is likely part of you cheating. So, there's no upside. "Mana weaving" doesn't actually accomplish anything, unless you're ...


14

As long as both Archetypes are in play, no creatures have hexproof. The most important rule to take into account here is rule 112.11: Effects can stop an object from having a specified ability. These effects say that the object "can't have" that ability. If the object has that ability, it loses it. It's also impossible for an effect to add that ability ...


14

From the Comprehensive Rules Glossary: Block Alone A creature “blocks alone” if it’s the only creature declared as a blocker during the declare blockers step. A creature “is blocking alone” if it’s blocking but no other creatures are. See rule 506.5. So it's your second option.


14

One of the wonderful things about silver-bordered cards is that we can do stuff that maybe doesn't technically work but that players would have lots of fun trying to make work. —Mark Rosewater In other words, the Un-sets were never designed to perfectly follow the rules of Magic. That's probably a big part of why they don't bother giving them ...


14

No The targets of abilities and spells are chosen as these go on the stack, so you should have had a target chosen already even before the merchant died in the first place.


14

Consider this portion of the text on Blightsteel Colossus. If Blightsteel Colossus would be put into a graveyard from anywhere, reveal Blightsteel Colossus and shuffle it into its owner's library instead. This text creates a replacement effect. A replacement effect "watches" for an event to happen. For example, regeneration is a replacement effect ...


14

It's not a permanent while it's on the stack. 110.1. A permanent is a card or token on the battlefield. 111.1. A spell is a card on the stack. Before it resolves, it's a spell (on the stack). After it resolves, it's a permanent (on the battlefield). So no, you cannot cast Avoid Fate targeting a Counterspell that's targeting your Elvish Mystic on ...


14

You untap your artifacts during player two's untap step, player three's untap step, and player four's untap step. This isn't anything that's in the comprehensive rules or anything, it's just the meaning of the words on the card. "Each other player" could be explained as "each player who is not you" or to be really clear "every single player who is not you". ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible