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27

They can't refuse a shortcut[1]; they can merely shorten it by naming a place where they will deviate from the shortcut. The game then advances to that point, and they must take a different action than the shortcut. 716.2b Each other player, in turn order starting after the player who suggested the shortcut, may either accept the proposed sequence, or ...


22

TL;DR: You survive if the damage and the life gain happen during the resolution of a single spell or ability. If the damage happens in one ability, and the life gain happens in a later one, you lose in between. In all of your situations except for the third (the one with Armadillo Cloak), you will survive. This is because in all of those cases, in every way ...


20

As long as you make it clear that you are casting the card as a 2/2 face-down creature with no text, no name, no subtypes, and no mana cost, it doesn't matter what you say. The comprehensive rules aren't specific about what you can legally say, and the tournament rules only say that everyone has to be clear about what's going on. When you cast a Megamorph ...


19

The general idea is that each ability is either "on" or "off" depending on whether its "as long as" clause is satisfied, so we just apply the abilities that are "on" to Heliod's base characteristics. Situation 1. (Devotion < 5, enchantments < 5.) In this situation, Heliod's "as long as" condition is true and Starfield's is false, so the only relevant ...


18

No. The trigger, "Whenever ~ attacks" means "Whenever ~ is declared as an attacking creature". A creature with double strike will deal damage in the two combat damage steps, but will only be declared as an attacker once per turn. (Normally, unless some other effect is creating additional combat phases.)


17

Mostly no, but it depends. First, here's a relevant quote from the tournament rules (section 2.7): Generally, decklists are not public information and are not shared with other players during a tournament. At constructed-format, Professional REL tournaments (Pro Tour, World Magic Cup, Magic: The Gathering World Championship, and Grand Prix), ...


17

When you are playing a game, you can reorder your hand whenever you want. Your opponent is not supposed to know which card is which in your hand unless your hand is revealed. If a spell allows you to make your opponent discard a card, it will either say [Player] discards a card at random from their hand. In which case, you should shuffle the hand ...


16

Priority can matter, but only in rare corner cases. Here are the main types of situations where priority matters. Some of these are pretty obscure. Split second cards: It's your turn. You have in hand Dark Depths and Vampire Hexmage for the infamous Marit Lage combo. Your opponent has Sudden Death in hand. Can you summon Marit Lage? The answer is ...


16

Yes, that was a legal move. You may cast multiple instants in the same turn. There's no limit beyond having the instants and being able to pay their cost. After taking the first two damage, your 4/4 would still be a 4/4. Those two numbers represent power/toughness - toughness is not health, but the amount of damage a creature can withstand in one turn. ...


16

He can do that. And Anticipate does have to resolve before he can look at his top 3 cards. When he played Anticipate in response to your Crackling Doom, it went on top of the stack, with Crackling Doom under it. The stack resolves from top to bottom, so his Anticipate would resolve first. After it resolves, he still has a chance to cast more instants while ...


16

Your opponent was correct. Only creatures controlled by the defending player may be declared as blockers. "Control" doesn't just mean "you decide what it does", it means you control it just like all your other creatures. It's on your side of the battlefield now (temporarily). But there are still an awful lot of nasty things you can do with a card like ...


15

When you want to cast a spell with X anywhere in the card's text (usually the casting cost), you have to announce which value X is going to have (Comp Rule 601.2b). Then you calculate the actual mana cost that you have to pay, at which time you consider cards like Arcane Melee (601.2e). Arcane Melee only reduces colorless mana costs, and any value below zero ...


15

Choice number 2 is the correct one: the Progenitus is an Insect with no abilities except Indestructible and the Aura stays attached to it. Rule 613.1 says The values of an object's characteristics are determined by starting with the actual object. For a card, that means the values of the characteristics printed on that card. For a token or a copy of a ...


15

I too was unable to find anything in either the CR or MTR defining this, so I asked Matt Tabak, current Rules Manager of Magic and he said: I just assumed that was self-evident. Like, if you get up from the table, you should know which cards to take with you. And a Level 2 Judge I asked said: From a practical standpoint, you’re going to be using ...


15

Protection doesn't provide perfect invulnerability against your stuff. The reminder text on the card lists specifically all of the things that you can't do. Here are some ways to deal with an opponent's True-Name Nemesis: Decrease your opponent's creatures' toughnesses. For example, if you play Elesh Norn, Grand Cenobite, your oppenent's creatures will get ...


15

Any. Your graveyard is a graveyard. Your opponent's graveyard is a graveyard. Cards in either graveyards are cards in a graveyard. It would say "your graveyard" or "an opponent's graveyard" otherwise.


15

Summoning Sickness "Summoning Sickness" is simply the name for rule 302.6: A creature's activated ability with the tap symbol [{T}] or the untap symbol [{Q}] in its activation cost can't be activated unless the creature has been under its controller's control continuously since his or her most recent turn began. A creature can't attack unless it has ...


14

You untap your artifacts during player two's untap step, player three's untap step, and player four's untap step. This isn't anything that's in the comprehensive rules or anything, it's just the meaning of the words on the card. "Each other player" could be explained as "each player who is not you" or to be really clear "every single player who is not you". ...


14

You are correct, these cards are not in booster packs. For the past few years, Wizards has put out 30 card sample decks to introduce new players into the game. This year they decided to put into these packs a number of reprinted cards not actually present in M15: see here for decklists. Like the article mentions, the Deck Builder's Toolkit for M15 also has ...


14

the community here seems fairly certain that Morph is not an ability. Morph is an ability. 702.36a Morph is a static ability that functions in any zone from which you could play the card it’s on [...] But the face-down permanent doesn't have it. 707.2. Face-down spells and face-down permanents have no characteristics other than those listed by ...


14

Generally, quite a few older deck names aren't really meaningful — they're a weird in-joke or just a random word someone pulled out of nowhere — and that tradition has been carried forward to the modern day in Legacy/Vintage as well. This is how you get the likes of Fruity Pebbles, Cephalid Breakfast, Team America (which is BUG, not ...


14

No, you cannot do that. You cannot target Elesh Norn with Teysa before Elesh is on the battlefield. However, as soon as Elesh is on the battlefield, its static -2/-2 ability is in effect, and your tokens will die as a state-based effect, before anyone gets priority and the opportunity to use regular spells or abilities. Note that Elesh's ability does not ...


14

It will be killed. All damage done to the creature in most cases stays until the very end of the turn (cleanup step). 119.6. Damage marked on a creature remains until the cleanup step, even if that permanent stops being a creature. If the total damage marked on a creature is greater than or equal to its toughness, that creature has been dealt lethal ...


13

Once the second Pledge enters the battlefield, the first one again starts granting protection from white to the Gnomes, which causes the second aura to fall off. This happens as a state-based action just after the second Pledge resolves.


13

No, it's not correct, and no, it wasn't a draw. As you know, if they were killed at the same time, it would be a draw. But they weren't killed at the same time. MTG is a turn-based game. It's impossible to cast two instants at the same time (at least under normal circumstances), and it's completely impossible for two instants to resolve at the same time. ...


13

Ajani Goldmane's -1 ability will give counters to all your creatures and also give them vigilance until end of turn: −1: Put a +1/+1 counter on each creature you control. Those creatures gain vigilance until end of turn. Ajani Steadfast's -2 ability will also give counters to all your creatures −2: Put a +1/+1 counter on each creature you control ...


13

The first rule for Cipher says Cipher appears on some instants and sorceries. It represents two abilities. The first is a spell ability that functions while the spell with cipher is on the stack. The second is a static ability that functions while the card with cipher is in the exile zone. "Cipher" means "If this spell is represented by a card, you may ...


13

No, they cannot change who they are attacking. Once a creature has been declared as an attacker you cannot change who (or what) it is attacking. Say instead of attacking Player B directly you attack their Planeswalker, but before damage gets dealt they Boomerang the Planeswalker back to their hand. You would not be able to redirect your creatures attack to ...


13

There are two main reasons for this way of doing it, one mechanics based, and one flavor based. The mechanical reason is that if they just transformed they would need to have additional text to put the loyalty counters on them, whereas if they exile then enter transformed they enter with the appropriate number of loyalty counters. The flavor reason is it ...


12

Well, it should have. In the ruling for Experiment One it clearly stats: If a creature enters the battlefield with +1/+1 counters on it, consider those counters when determining if evolve will trigger. For example, a 1/1 creature that enters the battlefield with two +1/+1 counters on it will cause the evolve ability of a 2/2 creature to trigger. You ...



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