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29

Lands (any permanent, really) can have +1/+1 counters just fine. In fact, Llanowar Reborn enters the battlefield with one! The counter(s) will not go away just because your blinkmoth stops being a creature. Of course, the +1/+1 counter doesn't do anything until the land becomes a creature again, but the +1/+1 counter will still be there.


23

No, that doesn't amount to an infinite loop, because of this term in cipher's definition: Whenever that creature deals combat damage to a player [...] (That's an extract from the reminder text, but the actual rules definition is virtually identical.) Combat damage is just the damage dealt during the combat damage step. In other words, it's the damage ...


23

There is no between turns; the end of one turn transitions immediately to the beginning of the next. The last time you can definitely activate abilities and play instants is during your opponent's End Step, which is after their second main phase. The end step is is followed by the cleanup step (the last step of the turn), when players usually do not gain ...


20

As long as you make it clear that you are casting the card as a 2/2 face-down creature with no text, no name, no subtypes, and no mana cost, it doesn't matter what you say. The comprehensive rules aren't specific about what you can legally say, and the tournament rules only say that everyone has to be clear about what's going on. When you cast a Megamorph ...


18

If I understand the situation you are describing correctly it is as follows: A player at 2 life casts Sphinx's Revelation with X = 2. this is put on the stack. His opponent responds by casting Warleader's Helix The initial player in turn responds by casting Sphinx's Revelation with X=1 Both players pass priority until the stack is resolved or some other ...


17

Mostly no, but it depends. First, here's a relevant quote from the tournament rules (section 2.7): Generally, decklists are not public information and are not shared with other players during a tournament. At constructed-format, Professional REL tournaments (Pro Tour, World Magic Cup, Magic: The Gathering World Championship, and Grand Prix), ...


16

First of all, as the other answers have indicated, Scalding Tarn does not produce any mana, it just lets you search for another land that can. The colors on this card have absolutely nothing to do with its ability. The blue and red are just there as a visual reminder that the ability lets you search for an Island or a Mountain. The card could be orange, or ...


16

Yes, it's of course against the rules: 705.3. A coin used in a flip must be a two-sided object with easily distinguished sides and equal likelihood that either side lands face up. If the coin that’s being flipped doesn’t have an obvious “heads” or “tails,” designate one side to be “heads,” and the other side to be “tails.” Other methods of randomization ...


15

This question is hypothetical and not covered by the rules. All current cards which cause a creature to lose all abilities also set the power/toughness of the creature, or cause it to no longer be a creature making the power/toughness irrelevant. It's a safe bet that loses all abilities cards are designed that way to avoid this conundrum.


15

Standard rotates once a year, in the fall. New cards printed in a core set or expansion set stay in Standard for between one to two years after their printing. Currently, the normal set release schedule is: One block (like Theros) on a yearly cycle: one sets each for fall, winter, and spring. One core set (like M14) each summer. A couple of specialty ...


15

When there are more than two players/teams. 103.7a In a two-player game, the player who plays first skips the draw step (see rule 504, “Draw Step”) of his or her first turn. 103.7b In a Two-Headed Giant game, the team who plays first skips the draw step of their first turn. 103.7c In all other multiplayer games, no player skips the draw step of ...


15

Priority can matter, but only in rare corner cases. Here are the main types of situations where priority matters. Some of these are pretty obscure. Split second cards: It's your turn. You have in hand Dark Depths and Vampire Hexmage for the infamous Marit Lage combo. Your opponent has Sudden Death in hand. Can you summon Marit Lage? The answer is ...


15

When you want to cast a spell with X anywhere in the card's text (usually the casting cost), you have to announce which value X is going to have (Comp Rule 601.2b). Then you calculate the actual mana cost that you have to pay, at which time you consider cards like Arcane Melee (601.2e). Arcane Melee only reduces colorless mana costs, and any value below zero ...


15

Choice number 2 is the correct one: the Progenitus is an Insect with no abilities except Indestructible and the Aura stays attached to it. Rule 613.1 says The values of an object's characteristics are determined by starting with the actual object. For a card, that means the values of the characteristics printed on that card. For a token or a copy of a ...


14

No The targets of abilities and spells are chosen as these go on the stack, so you should have had a target chosen already even before the merchant died in the first place.


14

Consider this portion of the text on Blightsteel Colossus. If Blightsteel Colossus would be put into a graveyard from anywhere, reveal Blightsteel Colossus and shuffle it into its owner's library instead. This text creates a replacement effect. A replacement effect "watches" for an event to happen. For example, regeneration is a replacement effect ...


14

I'm not familiar with this deck in particular, but it looks like this is a good example of a miser's copy (a singleton, usually with the connotation that it has a unique effect within your deck but you have no way to tutor for it). Some things to note about that card: It is really good in some situations It is really bad in others In the situations where ...


14

It's not a permanent while it's on the stack. 110.1. A permanent is a card or token on the battlefield. 111.1. A spell is a card on the stack. Before it resolves, it's a spell (on the stack). After it resolves, it's a permanent (on the battlefield). So no, you cannot cast Avoid Fate targeting a Counterspell that's targeting your Elvish Mystic on ...


14

You untap your artifacts during player two's untap step, player three's untap step, and player four's untap step. This isn't anything that's in the comprehensive rules or anything, it's just the meaning of the words on the card. "Each other player" could be explained as "each player who is not you" or to be really clear "every single player who is not you". ...


14

You are correct, these cards are not in booster packs. For the past few years, Wizards has put out 30 card sample decks to introduce new players into the game. This year they decided to put into these packs a number of reprinted cards not actually present in M15: see here for decklists. Like the article mentions, the Deck Builder's Toolkit for M15 also has ...


14

the community here seems fairly certain that Morph is not an ability. Morph is an ability. 702.36a Morph is a static ability that functions in any zone from which you could play the card it’s on [...] But the face-down permanent doesn't have it. 707.2. Face-down spells and face-down permanents have no characteristics other than those listed by ...


14

I too was unable to find anything in either the CR or MTR defining this, so I asked Matt Tabak, current Rules Manager of Magic and he said: I just assumed that was self-evident. Like, if you get up from the table, you should know which cards to take with you. And a Level 2 Judge I asked said: From a practical standpoint, you’re going to be using ...


14

Generally, quite a few older deck names aren't really meaningful — they're a weird in-joke or just a random word someone pulled out of nowhere — and that tradition has been carried forward to the modern day in Legacy/Vintage as well. This is how you get the likes of Fruity Pebbles, Cephalid Breakfast, Team America (which is BUG, not ...


13

There's not a lot you can do to screw over a player for being vague. Because the rules-provided answer is basically "Force them to be less vague." Really what players are doing when they say they make "a bunch" of tokens is telling their opponent "Look, I have my combo. Gonna scoop now?" If you do anything other than scoop, of course they're gonna play more ...


13

You have very little to worry about for standard in terms of banning cards. Standard is a very carefully designed format with a card pool small enough for wizards to have a very good grasp of the format in their internal testing phases. Every time they have banned a card they have learned from it, and the bans in standard are very few and far between. The 2 ...


13

Yes it does. See the rulings on Bioshift: To move a counter from one creature to another, the counter is removed from the first creature and placed on the second. Any abilities that care about a counter being removed or placed on a creature will apply. The ruling stems from the following rule: 121.5. If an effect says to “move” a counter, it means ...


13

"You" always refers to the controller of the ability, which is the controller of the creature at the time the ability triggers. So in this case, the player who controls Firedrinker Satyr at the time the damage is dealt to it - your opponent - will have the Satyr deal damage to them. 109.5. The words "you" and "your" on an object refer to the object's ...


13

What you were told about Athreos triggering for countered creature spells is incorrect. The official definition of "dies" in the comprehensive rules is: 700.4. The term dies means "is put into a graveyard from the battlefield." Since a countered creature spell is never a creature on the battlefield, it didn't "die". Similarly, a discarded creature ...


13

121.3. If a permanent has both a +1/+1 counter and a -1/-1 counter on it, N +1/+1 and N -1/-1 counters are removed from it as a state-based action, where N is the smaller of the number of +1/+1 and -1/-1 counters on it. See rule 704. Both counters will be removed as a state-based action (N=1). Your creature will be able to block and attack.


13

First, let me tell you about your obligations with regards to providing information. There are three categories of information: free, derived and private. Free information is information to which all players are entitled access without contamination or omissions made by their opponents. If a player is ever unable or unwilling to provide free ...



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