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37

Your friend made that up. There is nothing in the comprehensive rules about how long a player may retain priority. Once you've got it, you keep it as long as you like until you play a spell/ability or pass. If you're in an official tournament setting, your opponent can call a judge if he thinks you're intentionally playing slowly. If you're playing at your ...


32

According to Magic Head Designer Mark Rosewater's "Drive to Work" podcast on the subject, Wizards used "B" for Black and "L" for Land, leaving "U" as the next reasonable choice. Blue we represent with the letter U. Oh, real quickly. Why do we do that? I’ve talked about this in my column, but for those that haven’t heard me say it, when first Richard made ...


22

The full card text is: You don't lose the game for having 0 or less life. As long as you have 0 or less life, all damage is dealt to you as though its source had infect. (Damage is dealt to you in the form of poison counters.) If you have ten poison counters, you lose the game. You just need to get your opponent to zero, then deal ten more damage ...


21

It depends on the card in question. If it can't be determined use 0. 208.2a The card may have a characteristic-defining ability that sets its power and/or toughness according to some stated condition. (See rule 604.3.) Such an ability is worded "[This creature's] [power or toughness] is equal to . . ." or "[This creature's] power and toughness are ...


21

The question is partially answered in the article 25 Random Things About Magic: Magic was almost not called Magic. In fact, when the first solicitation for the game was sent out the game was called Mana Clash. The reason for this is as follows. Richard (Garfield, of course) called the game Magic when he originally designed it. All through the original ...


20

When the opponents gets a chance to cast Terror, the Goblin has already been sacrificed as part of the cost to cast Goblin Grenade. It's not available to be targetted by Terror. Additional costs are part of the total cost to cast a spell or activate an ability. To paraphrase 601.2e, total cost = mana cost or alternative cost + cost increases and ...


18

Short answer Yes. You should take cards out to keep a 60 card deck size. Medium answer Yes. It's always legal to play more than 60 cards. But when you design a deck, you don't - you keep it to 60 as much as possible. When you sideboard, you're redesigning your deck on the fly - and the same reasons that you kept it to 60 cards in the first place still ...


17

The short answer is that no matter what your opponent does with their Trapper, they cannot prevent you from activating your Wellwisher and gaining the life. The long answer involves explaining some of the key systems in the Magic rules. Magic resolves spells and abilities using a system called "the stack". When you cast a spell or ability, it goes on top ...


17

The game will be a draw. Darksteel Reactor will trigger, attempt to win you the game, and then resolve and do nothing (since you can't win the game). Once resolved, Darksteel Reactor will see that it is still in play and still has 20 counters, and it will trigger again. 603.8. A state-triggered ability doesn't trigger again until the ability has ...


16

You can "fail to find" a card, but only while explicitly searching someone's library or hand. In the case of Inquisition of Kozilek, you are not "searching" the zone, so you must choose a card if a valid choice is available. Per the comp rules, "fail to find" is specific to searching a hidden zone: 701.15b If a player is searching a hidden zone for ...


16

The Quag Sickness cannot be returned to the battlefield enchanting the White Knight. The relevant rule about Protection, 702.16c, says A permanent or player with protection can’t be enchanted by Auras that have the stated quality. and the relevant rule about Auras, 303.4f, says If an Aura is entering the battlefield under a player’s control by any ...


16

Yes, he can attach then, and yes, this does circumvent Ensnaring Bridge. Only the 'equip' ability is restricted to sorcery speed. The '{B}{B}: Attach Cranial Plating to target creature you control.' ability can be used anytime you have priority. That's why it's more expensive to use even though it has the same effect as Equip. Since the creature has ...


15

As soon as one of the Muscle Slivers leaves the battlefield, its ability disappears, leaving the other sliver smaller. Static abilities on permanents create continuous effects, functioning as long as the permanent is on the battlefield, no longer and no shorter. They are not activated; they simply are. That's why they're written as statements of fact: "All ...


15

MTG is a turn-based game. There is never a time when it matters who said what first.[CR 116.1] After a spell resolves, the Active Player regains priority.[CR 116.3b] He can then activate one of his Planeswalker's abilities before anyone else can do anything. If you play a Planeswalker and it's not countered, you're practically guaranteed to get a free use ...


14

There used to be a long shot that could make this happen: You start by playing the Mycosynth Lattice which turns all your permanents into artifacts, including planeswalkers. Then you play March Of the Machines, turning your planeswalker into an artifact creature with power and toughness equal to its casting cost. Then you use the ability of an Experiment ...


14

Bloodrush is an activated ability that you can activate from your hand and only from your hand. You cannot use bloodrush if the card is already on the battlefield. Most ability in Magic are only used from the battlefield, but abilities with costs that only apply in other zones, like "Discard this card," "Reveal this card from your hand," or "Exile this card ...


14

No, you can't do that. From Comprehensive Rules (bold mine): 707.6. If you control multiple face-down spells or face-down permanents, you must ensure at all times that your face-down spells and permanents can be easily differentiated from each other. This includes, but is not limited to, knowing the order spells were cast, the order that face-down ...


14

I am no Magic expert, but I think the answer is no. The target is chosen and needs to be valid when the card is played. Then the stack system kicks in, so the state of the game can change. When the card is resolved, you check whether the target is still valid. If it is, the effect happens, if it isn’t, the effect does not happen. In fact, you are not ...


14

What happens to a spell if an oppenent runs out of mana while casting it? That's impossible. There is no chance to use spend mana between the point where you start casting the spell and the point where you pay for it.[1] but in response I played Twiddle and tapped one of his lands. "In response to" means "after it has been cast but before it ...


14

Yes. Each of the Pack Rat copies will have a mana cost of 1B, which counts for devotion to black. Most tokens (like Elspeth's Soldier tokens) don't have a mana cost because the effect creating them doesn't specify one. Pack Rat, however, creates a token that is a copy of the card, meaning that it gains all of the original card's "copiable characteristics": ...


14

Unfortunately your understanding is incorrect. Your 5/5 Ghor-Clan Rampager with trample and double strike will be declared as an attacker, then all creatures able to block it must do so. Your opponent will declare their 2 creatures as blockers, and you will subsequently choose the order in which your ghor-clan rampager will deal its damage to those blocking ...


14

You cannot sacrifice a creature you do not control. The rule on sacrifice, 701.14a says To sacrifice a permanent, its controller moves it from the battlefield directly to its owner’s graveyard. A player can’t sacrifice something that isn’t a permanent, or something that’s a permanent he or she doesn’t control. Sacrificing a permanent doesn’t destroy it, ...


14

From the Comprehensive Rules Glossary: Block Alone A creature “blocks alone” if it’s the only creature declared as a blocker during the declare blockers step. A creature “is blocking alone” if it’s blocking but no other creatures are. See rule 506.5. So it's your second option.


14

Welding Jar can target itself. When you cast a spell or activate an ability, you choose targets (601.2c) before paying costs (601.2g). So the Welding Jar is still on the battlefield when it's time to choose targets, and is a valid target for its own ability. That ability will fizzle, of course, since you've already put Welding Jar in the graveyard by the ...


14

One of the wonderful things about silver-bordered cards is that we can do stuff that maybe doesn't technically work but that players would have lots of fun trying to make work. —Mark Rosewater In other words, the Un-sets were never designed to perfectly follow the rules of Magic. That's probably a big part of why they don't bother giving them ...


13

To piggyback on top of Jadasc's explanation: not only do the names go all the way back to Magic's dawn, we know that they do because of a number of misprints in Alpha that featured the actual letters for the colors on the cards! For instance, if you look at the Alpha printing of Phantasmal Forces, the text reads 'Controller must spend U during upkeep to ...


13

Those two spells Destroy. Regeneration replaces destruction, which means the destruction doesn't happen, which means it doesn't cause anything to go to the graveyard. If you cast the regeneration mode of Golgari Charm in response to Doom Blade or Supreme Verdict, your Hydras will be safe. They will not lose counters, enchantments, or equipment; they don't ...


13

Nope, nothing weird like that happens. When a card's rules text uses that card's name, it's referring to just that specific object, not anything else that happens to have the same name. Think of it as shorthand for "this particular Sin Collector", if you like. Here's the relevant comp rule: 201.4. Text that refers to the object it's on by name means just ...


13

No it does not. Once an attacker is declared attacking, it is attacking. Tapping or untapping it after it has been declared as an attacker will have no affect on that. While untapping can (to my knowledge) never stop a creature attacking, you can use an effect like Tumble Magnet in a players "Beginning of Combat" step, to prevent a specific creature from ...


13

Look at it this way: If you properly randomize your deck, then its initial configuration is irrelevant. So "mana weaving" is just wasting more productive time. If you don't properly randomize your deck, then "mana weaving" is likely part of you cheating. So, there's no upside. "Mana weaving" doesn't actually accomplish anything, unless you're ...



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