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27

They can't refuse a shortcut[1]; they can merely shorten it by naming a place where they will deviate from the shortcut. The game then advances to that point, and they must take a different action than the shortcut. 716.2b Each other player, in turn order starting after the player who suggested the shortcut, may either accept the proposed sequence, or ...


24

You can't just tap your creatures whenever you want. You can only tap it at one of the following times: When the game tells you to tap it (like when you attack). When a card tells you to tap it (like Twiddle). When you can tap it to pay a cost (like Endless Obedience). Cards that would allow you to tap King Macar include spells with conspire and convoke, ...


23

All combat damage is dealt simultaneously. But the damage from Perilous Myr's trigger isn't combat damage, it is an unrelated triggered ability. All combat damage was dealt, which resulted in the Myr dying and your opponent being at 0 health. This also resulted in the Myr's ability triggering, but that trigger never even makes it to the stack, because ...


23

Yes, if someone's asked to sacrifice multiple permanents, they can sacrifice Animate Dead and its enchanted creature. As part of enacting Emrakul's Annihilator ability, your opponent has to to make six choices. These six choices are made all at once during resolution, and at that point they're all valid choices, and then after those choices are made, the ...


22

TL;DR: You survive if the damage and the life gain happen during the resolution of a single spell or ability. If the damage happens in one ability, and the life gain happens in a later one, you lose in between. In all of your situations except for the third (the one with Armadillo Cloak), you will survive. This is because in all of those cases, in every way ...


22

Death Cloud does not target. The only time a spell targets is when it says target on the spell (or a keyword on it uses target, eg Enchant X or Support N). Thus Death Cloud will do as much as it can and make them sacrifice all 4 of their creatures. 609.3. If an effect attempts to do something impossible, it does only as much as possible. Example: ...


22

Short answer In a cost, the new diamond symbol {C} can only be paid with colorless, while {1} can be paid with any color or colorless. In an effect that adds mana to a mana pool, {C} means the same thing as {1}. Cards that do this will be updated to use {C} (e.g. Unknown Shores). Colorless mana doesn't work any differently (colorless is still not a color, ...


21

As long as you make it clear that you are casting the card as a 2/2 face-down creature with no text, no name, no subtypes, and no mana cost, it doesn't matter what you say. The comprehensive rules aren't specific about what you can legally say, and the tournament rules only say that everyone has to be clear about what's going on. When you cast a Megamorph ...


21

You can't shuffle whenever you want; rule 401.2 explicitly handles this case. 401.2. Each library must be kept in a single face-down pile. Players can’t look at or change the order of cards in a library. Plus, if you could shuffle at will, it would make cards that let you shuffle like Ponder pretty redundant.


21

As of the Magic 2015 redesign, rare and mythic rare cards will have a spot at the bottom of the card frame containing a small holofoil stamp. This has two effects: It makes it harder to produce counterfeit versions, so it's a sign of authenticity. It makes the card seem more special. Look, shiny!


19

The general idea is that each ability is either "on" or "off" depending on whether its "as long as" clause is satisfied, so we just apply the abilities that are "on" to Heliod's base characteristics. Situation 1. (Devotion < 5, enchantments < 5.) In this situation, Heliod's "as long as" condition is true and Starfield's is false, so the only relevant ...


19

No. The trigger, "Whenever ~ attacks" means "Whenever ~ is declared as an attacking creature". A creature with double strike will deal damage in the two combat damage steps, but will only be declared as an attacker once per turn. (Normally, unless some other effect is creating additional combat phases.)


18

Soulfire Grand Master is monocolored. Monocolored cards have exactly one color of mana in their cost. Colorless does not count as a color. So, a cost of 1 white and 1 colorless mana contains only one color - white. Of course, anything that specifically alters a card's color overrides this general rule. 105.2. An object can be one or more of the five ...


18

"Remove from the game" means "exile", and all cards that say it have been given errata to say exile. For example, Swords to Plowshares in newer printings reads "Exile target creature." And no matter what, the Oracle text for cards (the card text shown on Gatherer) will always have the correct wording with "exile", even if the card has never been physically ...


17

When you are playing a game, you can reorder your hand whenever you want. Your opponent is not supposed to know which card is which in your hand unless your hand is revealed. If a spell allows you to make your opponent discard a card, it will either say [Player] discards a card at random from their hand. In which case, you should shuffle the hand ...


17

Summoning Sickness "Summoning Sickness" is simply the name for rule 302.6: A creature's activated ability with the tap symbol [{T}] or the untap symbol [{Q}] in its activation cost can't be activated unless the creature has been under its controller's control continuously since his or her most recent turn began. A creature can't attack unless it has ...


17

Your opponent was correct. Only creatures controlled by the defending player may be declared as blockers. "Control" doesn't just mean "you decide what it does", it means you control it just like all your other creatures. It's on your side of the battlefield now (temporarily). But there are still an awful lot of nasty things you can do with a card like ...


17

Short Answer You can only get 1 Zombie token. One Jace and 2 Lilianas die simultaneously. And the Clever Impersonator can't copy anything, so it dies immediately. The Details I'll go through those in reverse order: First, Clever Impersonator has a ruling that says If Clever Impersonator enters the battlefield at the same time as another permanent, it ...


17

When it says that the spell's cost is "locked in" before payments are made, it means that you calculate the cost, including all modifiers, then you pay for it. This matches up with the steps described in the rules: you calculate the cost in step 601.2f, then pay the cost in step 601.2h. So, when calculating the cost of that Altar's Reap, you take the base ...


17

No, nothing like your friend's idea happens. Indestructible simply means they can't be destroyed, period. They can be exiled, returned to their owner's hand, sacrificed, have their toughness reduced to zero, shuffled into their owner's library, or even turned into frogs, but if anything tries to destroy them, including lethal damage, it just doesn't happen. ...


17

The land is a rare for a couple reasons: It is a land that can provide two colors and it has the chance to enter untapped. Entering untapped is important for maintaining tempo. It is a dual land*, in the classic sense of having two basic land types(Island Swamp). Lands with two basic types are very important, especially when fetch lands are currently in ...


16

You were correct. When your opponent activated Corpseweft's ability and exiled 3 creature cards from their graveyard, they should have put a single 6/6 black Zombie Horror creature token into play. There is nothing in the text of the ability about putting multiple tokens into play. In the future, if you have a disagreement like this over how a card or rule ...


16

Yes, that was a legal move. You may cast multiple instants in the same turn. There's no limit beyond having the instants and being able to pay their cost. After taking the first two damage, your 4/4 would still be a 4/4. Those two numbers represent power/toughness - toughness is not health, but the amount of damage a creature can withstand in one turn. ...


16

He can do that. And Anticipate does have to resolve before he can look at his top 3 cards. When he played Anticipate in response to your Crackling Doom, it went on top of the stack, with Crackling Doom under it. The stack resolves from top to bottom, so his Anticipate would resolve first. After it resolves, he still has a chance to cast more instants while ...


16

You can exile your opponents' Plains before Ulamog resolves, but you can't stop your opponent from getting mana from them. Assuming no one has anything else to do besides the things you mentioned, it'd go like this: You cast Ulamog. Ulamog's "when you cast..." ability triggers, and you target your opponents' two Plains. Your opponent taps both Plains for ...


15

Protection doesn't provide perfect invulnerability against your stuff. The reminder text on the card lists specifically all of the things that you can't do. Here are some ways to deal with an opponent's True-Name Nemesis: Decrease your opponent's creatures' toughnesses. For example, if you play Elesh Norn, Grand Cenobite, your oppenent's creatures will get ...


15

Any. Your graveyard is a graveyard. Your opponent's graveyard is a graveyard. Cards in either graveyards are cards in a graveyard. It would say "your graveyard" or "an opponent's graveyard" otherwise.


15

It will be killed. All damage done to the creature in most cases stays until the very end of the turn (cleanup step). 119.6. Damage marked on a creature remains until the cleanup step, even if that permanent stops being a creature. If the total damage marked on a creature is greater than or equal to its toughness, that creature has been dealt lethal ...


15

Yes you can, since the targeting requirement for counter spells is just 'target spell' not 'target spell that can be countered'. When the counterspell goes to resolve it will do as much as possible, so it won't counter the spell but any other effects it would have (like Frightful Delusion's discard) will still happen.


15

In general, you could win while a "you lose" effect is on the stack. Winning/losing is a state-based action and the stack doesn't finish resolving if the game is over (e.g. a 2 player game). However, with the Immortal Coil situation you describe, you lose. This is because the Immortal Coil in question won't create another triggered ability on the stack ...



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