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0

As Hackworth said, Restore the Peace will effect creatures with hexproof. Hexproof creatures are protected from spells that "target" them, but aren't protected from spells that effect the entire battlefield (even those with conditionals). A card like Restore the Peace effects each creature that dealt damage, and would therefore effect hexproof creatures ...


1

Instants and sorceries would stay in the zone they're currently in, in your case in Exile. They do nothing. 304.4. Instants can’t enter the battlefield. If an instant would enter the battlefield, it remains in its previous zone instead. 307.4. Sorceries can’t enter the battlefield. If a sorcery would enter the battlefield, it remains in its previous ...


13

Your opponent was correct. Only creatures controlled by the defending player may be declared as blockers. "Control" doesn't just mean "you decide what it does", it means you control it just like all your other creatures. It's on your side of the battlefield now (temporarily). But there are still an awful lot of nasty things you can do with a card like ...


1

If the primary player has moved forward to the draw step, then the trigger was missed. If the secondary player is the one that drew a card, then that player has drawn extra cards. In either case, at regular REL, you should call a judge, explain what happened, and allow the judge to decide whether the trigger was missed or whether the game should be rolled ...


5

It depends on exactly what you are responding to (and if you have Spell Mastery, I'm assuming you don't for purposes of this answer). The Spirits' ability does indeed use the stack, so if you respond to that you will destroy them, if you wait for the ability to resolve but before the enchantment spell resolves it will not destroy them. The ability of the ...


5

Yes. Hexproof means that the creature with Hexproof cannot be the target of spells or abilities an opponent controls. Restore the Peace does not target creatures, it's a global effect, so Hexproof does not offer any protection in this case.


1

Our group uses index cards, which is pretty handy because you can just write the static stats (color, creature type, BASE P/T, etc) on the card. D6 on top of the card is usually enough for counters, and d10/20 to count a group of identical tokens if things start getting... silly...


0

I've been following this question for sometime now and have to post an answer because I don't have enough reputation :(. That said, here are more current Estimated Values for these sets, and I've written more on my blog about how to estimate value against current prices. In general, the estimated value will always be lower than the market going rate for ...


6

Toughness never gets used up. Damage doesn't change toughness (or power), and it doesn't use counters, it's simply marked on creatures. If a creature ends up marked with damage greater than or equal to its toughness, it dies. But the whole time, the creature still has its original toughness. You probably shouldn't even think of it as having its toughness ...


6

Yes you can, in this case 'another creature' means a creature other than Blood Host, not a creature that you haven't sacrificed before. Even if that weren't the case once it move from the battlefield to the graveyard the first time the game no longer sees it as the same creature. 400.7. An object that moves from one zone to another becomes a new object ...


4

Yes, you can do that. Your title here is a bit misleading; you're not actually sacrificing the same creature twice: 400.7. An object that moves from one zone to another becomes a new object with no memory of, or relation to, its previous existence. There are seven exceptions to this rule: ... (none of the exceptions apply here) So once you reassemble ...


1

You can use Wizards of the Coast's Gatherer Website to generate lists of cards for each format. For example, here is a list of cards legal in Standard Constructed.


10

I know the Dragonrage's affect will trigger Heroic... Actually, it doesn't. The word "target" doesn't appear anywhere on Dragonrage, and it's not an aura, so it doesn't target, and so it doesn't trigger heroic. As an alternative example, Dragon Mantle is an aura, so it does trigger heroic when you initially cast it. the "R: This creature gains ...


3

No. When the Acolyte is blocked, it immediately deals two damage to that creature, before combat damage is handled. This goes on the stack the same as instants that would be cast after blockers are assigned but before damage is dealt. This means that if it is blocked by a one or two toughness creature, that creature dies before dealing damage to the acolyte. ...


3

No, it does exactly what it says: it deals two damage. This ability will trigger in the declare blockers step, when your opponent declares a blocker for the Acolyte. If the creature isn't already dead from that two damage, then in the combat damage step, it will also deal damage equal to its power to the blocking creature. (Of course, if the blocking ...


6

Yes, the ability was still activated even if it gets countered. Activating the ability is merely the process of paying its costs and putting it onto the stack, completely independent of what happens after that: 602.2. To activate an ability is to put it onto the stack and pay its costs, so that it will eventually resolve and have its effect. ... All ...


5

This sounds like it is a bug. Since the way the Combat Damage Step works is Each player decides how their creatures will deal damage If any creatures have First Strike or Double Strike they deal their damage State Based Actions are checked, anything that triggers off of damage happens, players get priority Any creatures with Double Strike or that didn't ...


2

You can also get Clash packs, which are really good value for their cost. The new release "Outlast" is said to be worth Twice its price. they give you two Set Decks of 60 cards that work Flawlessly. I have bought this pack myself so I know from experience. Alternatively there maybe certain places you can go that Host "Friday Night Magic" it is getting ...


15

Summoning Sickness "Summoning Sickness" is simply the name for rule 302.6: A creature's activated ability with the tap symbol [{T}] or the untap symbol [{Q}] in its activation cost can't be activated unless the creature has been under its controller's control continuously since his or her most recent turn began. A creature can't attack unless it has ...


2

They are not removed at the end of your turn. In fact, there are very, very few instances in which the rules remove counters from objects. They are the following: Dealing damage to a Planeswalker removes loyalty counters. SBAs cancel out +1/+1 and -1/-1 counter pairs by removing them. SBAs remove extra counters when a permanent has a limit to how many of a ...


4

They stay on the creature. The rules for Infect say: 702.89c Damage dealt to a creature by a source with infect isn’t marked on that creature. Rather, it causes that many -1/-1 counters to be put on that creature. See rule 119.3. There is nothing in the rules that removes them, therefore they stay on the damaged creature. From the Gatherer rulings on ...


8

Summoning sickness applies to all creatures without haste, regardless of how they came to be. From the comprehensive rules: 302.6. A creature’s activated ability with the tap symbol or the untap symbol in its activation cost can’t be activated unless the creature has been under its controller’s control continuously since his or her most recent turn ...


5

The paragraph breaks are only there for clarity. You always do everything the card says, and there's nothing in the game that tries to count how many effects a spell had. That said, Wizards is pretty consistent about doing this for readability, I think in roughly the way you've noted. Incinerate is all in one paragraph because it's all related; the second ...


4

In addition to Ashley's answer, a creature with double strike and trample will still assign damage in both phases if it's blocked but the blocking creature is no longer in play. That's because of this rule for trample. 702.19c If an attacking creature with trample is blocked, but there are no creatures blocking it when damage is assigned, all its ...


8

As Ikegami mentioned in a comment, the answer is no. Double strike (as well as first strike) adds an additional combat damage step where creatures with double (or first) strike deal their damage. Creatures that die as a result of this damage will be removed from combat before the second combat damage step happens. So the order of things is: Declare ...


6

If you want to start with a core set, Magic Origins is fine to buy - it's going to be in standard another 18 months. The changes are all in the future: no more core sets after this one, two-set blocks, changed rotation schedule. But that doesn't change that Magic Origins is here now! Even if nothing were changing, it'd still be another year until the next ...


10

There are two main reasons for this way of doing it, one mechanics based, and one flavor based. The mechanical reason is that if they just transformed they would need to have additional text to put the loyalty counters on them, whereas if they exile then enter transformed they enter with the appropriate number of loyalty counters. The flavor reason is it ...


9

The only restriction is that you have to do it before the End of Combat step, so you can do it after damage is dealt. When Kytheon's ability says "if Kytheon, Hero of Akros attacked..." it means "if this creature attacked...". Specifically, rule 201.4 says Text that refers to the object it's on by name means just that particular object and not any other ...


-2

You have to manifest Kytheon before combat, otherwise he will not count as having attacked. 711.2. Each face of a double-faced card has its own set of characteristics. 711.2a In every zone other than the battlefield, and also on the battlefield with its front face up, a double-faced card has only the characteristics of the front face. Kytheon ...


8

The Magic: the Gathering Tournament Rules (MTR) makes it clear that a judge should not intervene before a rule has been broken, but should intervene after a rule has been broken. In other words, a judge should be reactive, not proactive. Judges do not intervene in a game to prevent illegal actions, but do intervene as soon as a rule has been broken or to ...


3

Great question! This is a confusing thing for less experienced players. We know from 701.17b that (emphasis mine) To untap a permanent, rotate it back to the upright position from a sideways position. Only tapped permanents can be untapped. This would seem to indicate that we're doing something illegal. However, there is a difference between an effect ...


3

Yes, you can use the Quest for Pure Flame's ability to double the damage from the Furnace Scamp's triggered ability. When the Furnace Scamp deals combat damage, both its triggered ability and the Quest's triggered ability go on the stack. For this to work, you have to put the Quest's triggered ability on top of the Scamp's ability. Then, do the following: ...


9

Yes, you are allowed to use Gustcloak Savior's ability to remove an attacking creature from combat, even if it is not tapped. Gustcloak Savior's ability is a triggered ability, that triggers in your Declare Blockers step for each of your attacking creatures that have become blocked. Then, when the ability resolves, it lets you choose whether to have the ...


11

Indestructible prevents the permanent from being destroyed. This usually is caused by damage exceeding a creature's toughness, or an effect that explicitly says that it will destroy a permanent. The main ways that a creature with indestructible will die (being put to the graveyard from the battlefield) will be: Having its toughness reduced to zero. ...


7

A permanent is any card or token on the battlefield. This includes lands, creatures, artifacts, enchantments, and planeswalkers. Note that they have to actually be on the battlefield to be permanents. For example, a creature card on the battlefield is a permanent, though it's usually just referred to as a creature - the "permanent is implied". If it's on ...


8

The Basic Rulebook answers this question. permanent—Lands, creatures, artifacts, enchantments, and planeswalkers are permanents. They enter the battlefield after you cast them. Token creatures are also permanents. Instants and sorceries are not permanents. They go to the graveyard after they resolve.


2

All you really need to know is that you lose the game if you get 10, and that they're nearly impossible to remove. Generally if you see a card that talks about poison counters, it'll be a card that gives them, so this should never really be confusing - if the cards don't mention them, you don't have to worry about them. By far the main way to get poison ...


3

A creature with indestructible can die as a result of anything that is not damage (Lightning Bolt) and does not explicitly use the word 'destroy' (Doom Blade). The most common ways: Toughness reduced to less than zero. (This is neither damage nor a 'destroy' effect.) e.g., Death Wind The creature's controller is forced to sacrifice it. e.g., All is Dust ...


-1

I use a three color deck (white,blue,green). It works well with me because I have worked out a good manna base for every type of deck. on my main I use 45 lands 15 from each color I have in my three color deck .it works really well for me and my strictly 100 card deck


14

It will be killed. All damage done to the creature in most cases stays until the very end of the turn (cleanup step). 119.6. Damage marked on a creature remains until the cleanup step, even if that permanent stops being a creature. If the total damage marked on a creature is greater than or equal to its toughness, that creature has been dealt lethal ...


3

It means exactly what it says, if a creature would enter the battlefield and it wasn't cast it will get exiled instead. It doesn't matter how it was cast, or where it was cast from, as long as it was cast instead of just being put onto the battlefield. Some examples of things that will cause a creature to be exiled due to those abilities are Rise from the ...


5

Not only are you allowed to share cards, you are as a team considered to have a single card pool that you build your decks from. Section 9.6 of the Tournament rules says Two-Headed Giant Limited Rules All the rules for Limited Tournaments (Section 7) apply, except as described below. The DCI recommends that each team receive eight boosters per ...


3

The only cost-like requirement to attacking is the tapping of the attacker. There is no mana cost. While certain cards impose restrictions on attacking, and while some even impose a cost (e.g. Ghostly Prison), the cost never requires colored mana. Many creatures have abilities that require colored mana to activate. If you control such a creature, and if ...


6

You don't need to pay mana to attack unless a card specifically says so. So, if you take control of a black creature using a white deck, you can attack with that creature.


9

You cannot cast a spell without choosing all specified targets. In the process of casting a spell, we have these rules 601.2. To cast a spell is to take it from where it is (usually the hand), put it on the stack, and pay its costs, so that it will eventually resolve and have its effect. Casting a spell follows the steps listed below, in order. If, at ...


5

Are you forced to play both abilities when you cast the spell? Yes. Unless there are qualifiers ("may"/"up to" are popular ones), you must resolve all of a spell's effects. Is that because those are spell abilities, whereas in the first example above they are activated abilities? Not quite. It is because you are never forced to activate (pay the ...


-3

Actually, it does count as attacking twice. According to the mtg wiki and some other referances, there is a first-strike attack phase and a regular attack phase. Take a look Here at the wiki. So, due to the fact that she is attacking twice, that power would be activated twice when you declare that she is attacking. If you do not believe me, take a look at ...


6

No. Declaring a creature to attack only happens once per combat phase, no matter how often it deals combat damage. There are some cards that grant you additional combat phases. A creature with Double Strike would only trigger "on dealing (combat) damage" triggers twice.


17

No. The trigger, "Whenever ~ attacks" means "Whenever ~ is declared as an attacking creature". A creature with double strike will deal damage in the two combat damage steps, but will only be declared as an attacker once per turn. (Normally, unless some other effect is creating additional combat phases.)


6

If both players can't verify which cards were drawn that turn any unverified cards cannot be returned to the top of the library with Sylvan Library. If you think you might be playing a Library with Flash be sure to keep track of which cards you have drawn that turn. From the Magic Judge Rules Blog: Here’s the Official ruling that has been handed down ...



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