New answers tagged

1

Yes, you can use Ruins of Oran-Rief on that Awakened land. The ability in question is this one, I presume: {T}: Put a +1/+1 counter on target colorless creature that entered the battlefield this turn. After your land's awakened, it's a colorless creature. That land did also enter the battlefield this turn. So, yes, at this point it meets all the ...


5

They cannot boost after you have assigned your damage. The last chance that players have to activate abilities and cast instants is in the declare blockers step, after all blockers have been assigned. They could cast a boost at that point, but you would already know the actual toughness when assigning damage, and you would have to assign lethal damage to the ...


5

Nahiri's ability would be countered due to a lack of legal target (commonly called 'fizzling'). This is because the legality of a target is checked at 2 different times, when the ability is activated and put on the stack and then again when the ability goes to resolve. 608.2b If the spell or ability specifies targets, it checks whether the targets are ...


1

Overall, most cards of the same rarity have the same frequency of occurring. As an exception, in sets with 101 commons, exactly 1 common is short printed and shows up 5 times for every 6 times each other common in the set would. This is because there are 2 Print Sheets of 121 cards, Sheet A with 60 cards showing up twice and 1 showing once and Sheet B has ...


13

Neglected Heirloom transforms once, into Ashmouth Blade, and stays that way. (Until something exceptional happens, like another effect or removal, like you said.) The transformation rule on the Neglected Heirloom front face doesn't matter once it's transformed. The currently face-up side is all that matters, which is Ashmouth Blade. It doesn't have an ...


4

This is answered in the magic comprehensive rules, rule 506.4, in particular 506.4b: 506.4 A permanent is removed from combat if it leaves the battlefield, if its controller changes, if it phases out, if an effect specifically removes it from combat, if it's a planeswalker that's being attacked and stops being a planeswalker, or if it's an attacking or ...


0

Summoning sickness applies to all abilities of a creature that include the tap symbol as a cost, but other abilities with other costs may be played instantly.


1

If a judge is made aware of a situation where the players agreed to a fix that does not follow the rules they need to intervene and make sure appropriate action is taken. The reason is that even a single match can change the tournament standings if tiebreakers are needed between different players. Tournament Rules The following tiebreakers are used to ...


3

Players cannot make rulings, that should be obvious; only judges can. From the Tournament Rules: Judges do not intervene in a game to prevent illegal actions, but do intervene as soon as a rule has been broken or to prevent a situation from escalating. More information on floor judge responsibilities can be found in the Magic Infraction Procedure ...


8

There are not any cards that are non-land and a Plains. This is because each type has their own list of subtypes that can be associated with them and Plains is a land subtype. Cards cannot have subtypes that don't match one of their types, therefore it is impossible to have a card that is a Plains but not a land. 205.3d An object can’t gain a subtype ...


2

@JonTheMon points out how a misinterpretation of the card's text led to your question. However, the literal answer to your question is no, there are no nonland plains (shown in this query). All 13 cards with the subtype Plains also have the type Land.


9

Your text is slightly off. It's actually: Whenever a land enters the battlefield under your control, you may return target nonland permanent card from your graveyard to your hand. If that land is a Plains, you may return that nonland permanent card to the battlefield instead. So, it's referring to the land that triggers landfall, not the nonland ...


8

Friday Night Magic runs at Regular REL, and is covered by Judging at Regular. The Tournament Rules and Infraction Procedure Guide cover Competitive and Professional REL. This answer borrows from all three documents and covers all three RELs. Should I call a judge? Absolutely. Am I required to call a judge? No. According to the Infraction Procedure Guide, ...


2

The Infraction Procedure Guide is the wrong document to refer to at FNM. FNMs are run at Regular REL, where players generally do not get penalized for gameplay errors. See the Judging at Regular REL document for the kinds of fixes (rather than penalties) that can get dispensed at FNM. In this case, after you notice 7 cards in what should be your hand of 6, ...


-5

dark steel reactor has "20 or more charge counters " so it will just continue gaining counters until either platinum angel or dark steel is removed


6

Yes, these both happen on layer 6: ability-adding and ability-removing effects. When one effect is adding one or more abilities, and a second effect is trying to remove them, then the one that "wins" is the one generated last in timestamp order. The Borderland Minotaur won't have deathtouch in that scenario: it gains it, then loses it. Rule 613.8 actually ...


6

All Aberrant Researchers trigger independently of each other. An instant or sorcery revealed by one does not flip the other. If an object (for example, a creature) refers to itself by name in its card text, it only means itself, not other permanents with the same name. 201.4. Text that refers to the object it’s on by name means just that particular ...


5

Delayed triggered abilities (DTAs) simply exist on their own, they do not depend on the existence of another object. A spell or ability creates one-shot effects and/or continuous effects. Creation of a DTA is a certain kind of one-shot effect: 610.2. Some one-shot effects create a delayed triggered ability, which instructs a player to do something later ...


1

I think the intended interpretation is that a delayed triggered ability lives the same place as continuous effects like "Your creatures have +1/+1 until end of turn" live: nowhere in particular. They aren't objects on the stack (at least not until the delayed trigger is met) because you're right, that would prevent players from getting on with the game. ...


2

The image of the cards you sent are a perfect example of acceptable altering for tournament play. As far as commander games go, you can sometimes get away with not even having a legal copy of your commander and instead playing with an oversized version of the card. Commander is very lenient and you can usually get away with altering cards so that they don't ...


24

Official Rulings by high-level tournament judges explicitly say that you can take those shortcuts: A player with the ability to scry 1 ‘infinitely’ may shortcut this action by examining the library without reordering it and cutting it to a specific location. A player with the ability to scry 2 or more infinitely may shortcut this action by rearranging ...


0

Yes, you can propose any shortcut you like, at any time. If the sequence of plays is legal and your opponent accepts it, you are free to do your combo as you described. At a sanctioned event, preferably ask a judge before taking the shortcut you describe. The Rules Enforcement Level (REL) doesn't really come into play here. What you are proposing is ...


10

I disagree with the ruling made by the floor judge. I also disagree with upgrading the penalty to a warning. Ruling First, let's get some terminology down: You are the controller of the trigger. I interpret "action" to mean "game action". For example: Resting your hands on your lands is not a game action. Untapping your lands is a game action. Silence ...


0

You passed priority to him when you told him to take his turn while you searched your deck (more on this in a second), and then you missed the trigger on his upkeep. So the issue wasn't with you touching your lands, it was with where the game state was when you noticed the error. My guess is that when he went to draw a card, if you had stopped him and said ...


0

Depends. Clip Wings says each of your opponents has to sacrifice a creature with flying. As long as that enchanted Rancid Rats is his only flying creature then yes it will have to be sacrificed. If he has other creatures with flying then he could sacrifice one of those instead.


3

Neither is correct. Player A is wrong because he returned his blocker before combat damage was assigned and dealt therefore the attacker would not die. Player B is wrong because player A can successfully block AND return his creature. The attacker's deathtouch ability is irrelevant.


0

iMtG for iOS has full blown inventory management system linked with Deck Builder. It is completely free for people with collections which would fit in 3 binders. iMtG is made by someone who cares, it has had regular database updates since 2011. It is important as many other MTG collection manager apps failed to keep updating their databases over the years. ...


20

As noted by Hackworth, Player B is correct under the current rules. One possible source of confusion in the situation is that it used to work the way Player A thinks. You could "put damage on the stack" then play abilities in the combat damage step in response, before the damage resolved. This was removed with the 2010 major rules update (the one that ...


10

Player B is right. In each combat damage step (First strike/double strike, then other creatures), all creatures deal their combat damage at the same time, and you don't get the chance to cast spells or activate abilities: 510.2. Second, all combat damage that’s been assigned is dealt simultaneously. This turn-based action doesn’t use the stack. No ...


9

Yes. A "creature with flying" is any creature that currently has the ability "flying" for any reason - whether its own card text, an enchantment, or even a temporary source like Aerial Maneuver which grants flying until end of turn.


2

Saying a creature has "summoning sickness" just means that it hasn't been under its controllers control since the beginning of their turn and it doesn't have haste. Such a creature cannot attack and cannot cause itself to become tapped (i.e. you can't pay a Tap or Untap cost in an ability on that creature - it can still become tapped or untapped by other ...


10

No, because you don't attack creatures in Magic; you attack players (or planeswalkers), and then the player being attacked can choose to block (or not block) your attacking creatures with their creatures if able. If your opponent has nothing with flying or reach, they will be unable to block an attacking flyer, and so your flyer will deal damage directly to ...


5

...the pump spell wore off at the end step, but damage was not removed until the cleanup step. There's your problem. "...until end of turn" actually means until the cleanup step - the actual end of the turn, not just the end step. Cleanup Step 514.1 [discard to maximum hand size] 514.2. Second, the following actions happen ...


1

Unable to comment so had to post as an answer. To add to Diego's answer, the reason why you will need to pay 6 for Bring to Light and the 1 additional for a non creature spell tutored with it (for a total of 7 Mana), is even though Bring to Light states "You may cast that card without paying its mana cost." is: 117.9d If an alternative cost is being ...


5

Online Communities There are a variety of online forums for discussing Magic, some more popular ones are: MTG Salvation TappedOut (This one also has a popular deck builder you can use to share and get comments on decks you build) MTG Fanatic Commander/EDH There are many more out there, this is just a few from a search for 'mtg forums' Staying up to ...


-3

No this doesn't work. 602.2. To activate an ability is to put it onto the stack and pay its costs, so that it will eventually resolve and have its effect. Only an object’s controller (or its owner, if it doesn’t have a controller) can activate its activated ability unless the object specifically says otherwise. Activating an ability follows the steps ...


3

The relevant rule is 116.1d A player may activate a mana ability whenever he or she has priority, whenever he or she is casting a spell or activating an ability that requires a mana payment, or whenever a rule or effect asks for a mana payment (even in the middle of casting or resolving a spell or activating or resolving an ability). You announce the ...


10

You can do this. The fundamental thing that allows you to do this is that one of the last steps of casting a spell or activating an ability is 601.2g: If the total cost includes a mana payment, the player then has a chance to activate mana abilities (see rule 605, “Mana Abilities”). Mana abilities must be activated before costs are paid. This rule ...


3

What does it cost? You will end up paying 7 mana total, 6 for Bring to Light and 1 for the spell you find with it. What happens is you cast Bring to Light you determine the cost of paying the spell, in this case the mana cost + the cost increase so you will pay 6 total mana for it. Then when Bring to Light resolves you go through the cost determination for ...


15

It is because Bring to Light and Evoke are both alternate costs, and you can only choose one alternate cost when casting a spell. Since Bring to Light is what is giving you permission to cast the Revilark in the first place you have to use its alternative cost, you can't Evoke it (by paying mana) off of Bring to Light. Compare this to Omniscience which also ...


5

Casting a spell without paying its mana cost is an alternative cost (as is Evoke), and you can only use one alternative cost. Bring to Light only allows you to cast it with that one specific alternate cost (i.e. "free"), so you can't use a different one, even if you wanted to use the Evoke cost instead of the free cost - you don't have permission to cast the ...


0

Nope the CMC has to do with the mana cost as it is printed on the card itself. There are many cards that may add or reduce the actual mana spent to cast a card but that does not change the CMC. There is one exception. When you have cards that have X in there mana cost X is considered 0 in regards to the CMC everywhere except when the spell is on the stack. ...


5

No, the Pridemate's ability doesn't trigger when your teammate gains life, because while your shared life total goes up it is not you gaining life. Two-Headed Giant FAQ: How does damage, loss of life, and gaining life work with the single life total for the team? Damage, loss of life, and gaining life happens to each player individually. The result is ...


3

Yes, the enchanted creature would grow more powerful. From the Comprehensive Rules: 604.1. Static abilities do something all the time rather than being activated or triggered. They are written as statements, and they’re simply true. 611.3a A continuous effect generated by a static ability isn’t “locked in”; it applies at any given moment to ...


7

Player 2 can't really stop player 1 from casting an artifact as if it had flash, outside of destroying Shimmer Myr while player 1 is tapped out. At any given time, one player has priority. If player 2 has priority first and casts Naturalize, player 1 can respond by casting an artifact. If player 1 has priority, they can cast an artifact. Once they do so, ...


6

The creature will not die or be exiled, and instead the aura with Totem Armor will be destroyed. Anger of the Gods says Anger of the Gods deals 3 damage to each creature. If a creature dealt damage this way would die this turn, exile it instead. And Totem Armor is an ability defined in rule 702.88a: Totem armor is a static ability that appears on ...


4

The creature will not die or be exiled. The ability Indestructible is defined in rule 702.12b: A permanent with indestructible can’t be destroyed. Such permanents aren’t destroyed by lethal damage, and they ignore the state-based action that checks for lethal damage (see rule 704.5g). So, if you resolve Reduce to Ashes targeting an indestructible ...


3

Reduce to Ashes can exile an indestructible creature, but it can't kill such a creature. You are correct in that Reduce to Ashes can't kill an indestructible creature. However, it will still exile that creature if it dies in another way. 700.4. The term dies means “is put into a graveyard from the battlefield.” This usually happens as the result of ...


1

No, the indestructible creature doesn't die, so the replacement effect of Reduce to Ashes doesn't happen. 702.12. Indestructible 702.12a Indestructible is a static ability. 702.12b A permanent with indestructible can’t be destroyed. Such permanents aren’t destroyed by lethal damage, and they ignore the state-based action that checks ...


5

In all honesty, I think a lot of arguments revolving around information hiding and headgames are overblown. Being able to efficiently sequence your resources and analyze lines of play is far more important than pulling off an occasional bluff or reading tells. And fiddling with land drop sequencing is a fairly minor part of bluffing. In terms of ...



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