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-2

Keep on to them by keeping them they build up value


0

To straighten out cards I would suggest you dry them in an oven. Test with one or two first. Set the oven to 60°C and leave for 30 mins, you may see them curl the other way! After cooling place directly into a sleeve. The theory behind curling is water absorption into the card itself causing expansion thus drying it should to a degree reverse the process. ...


1

First off, what is a bomb? According to a Limited Information article it is ... a powerful, game-ending, stabilizing card. though the author does admit that other people might have slightly different definitions. The MTG Salvation Wiki describes a bomb as ...a card, generally used in conjunction with Limited play, that always makes a large card impact on a ...


3

Travis Woo has an interesting article, "90 Card Living End", that has a good explanation of yet another reason to have more than 60 cards: his deck is based on a combo that relies on the card Living End being in his library. Actually drawing Living End is a problem for the deck, so he plays more cards because he doesn't want to draw the most important card. ...


-1

If I use for example faithless looting, can I replace each draw with a dredge target providing I have two dredge targets in my graveyard, or does it just simply replace the second card draw ability if I choose to dredge and only allow me to dredge once?


11

When you want to cast a spell with X anywhere in the card's text (usually the casting cost), you have to announce which value X is going to have (Comp Rule 601.2b). Then you calculate the actual mana cost that you have to pay, at which time you consider cards like Arcane Melee (601.2e). Arcane Melee only reduces colorless mana costs, and any value below zero ...


-2

most handicap systems handicap permanently, 1 less card, 1 smaller hand, 5 less life etc. this usally can be majorly detrimental. also most effects are to clunky -1 card may be too little, but -2 too much mainly as the effect is permanant. I suggest a delayed return to normality. in my example your draw is behind (nearly-it moves to the end of the turn) 1 ...


1

Even ignoring all the aforementioned reasons in the others answers, I would simplify saying that it's just not fun to play with. I tried playing with my friend using only Homelands set cards and it was horrible. You couldn't do any interesting combination, no strategy. You feel powerless, impotent. A lot of people (kids at the time) bought large ...


3

Declaring a creature as a blocker is different from an attacker being blocked. Declaring a blocker requires meeting requirements and restrictions for blocking (such as only blocking flying creatures with a flying or reach creature). Being blocked means that you deal damage to the blocking creature(s) instead of the defending player (or with trample, deal ...


8

Yes, the creatures will still be blocked by tokens. See the ruling on Nature Shields its Own: The Plant token blocks the attacking creature even if the block couldn't legally be declared (for example, if the attacking creature has flying). This is because things like flying and protection only affect the declare blockers step. The prevent a creature ...


-1

In answer to your bolded question: Yes, some newer cards (Return to Ravnica block and beyond) have the ability to target planeswalkers. Specifically Fated Conflagration, Hero's Downfall and Dreadbore all target planeswalkers specifically.


0

It depends on what you want mean with "support". A Core set is a set, a fatpack is a box with boosters (from a core set or an expansion). If you buy a boosterbox (I think you mean that) for example you have 36 boosters. You can draft using 3 boosters per player, thus 12 players. If you want to play sealed, you can use 6 boosters per player, thus 6 players. ...


1

A Planeswalker is never a player. Spells that target a player can't target a planeswalker. However, noncombat damage can be redirected to a planeswalker (damage only, not lifeloss), but it doesn't affect the player anymore when you do that. So cards like Hypnotic Specter won't cause the opponent to discard a card if damage is redirected, since the damage ...


8

Planeswalkers are not players (or opponents), and they're never treated as players (or opponents). Don't think of them as players, and you'll be a lot less likely to get confused. There are two rules that make them seem a little similar to players: You can choose to attack your opponent and/or planeswalkers they control. If a source you control would deal ...


-2

Planeswalkers are never treated as opponents. As to your specific questions: no, no, no, no, no, no, and no.


2

At the start of your turn, you draw 1 card. In a two player game, the start player does not draw a card at the start of his first turn. If a computer version of MTG did not let you draw a card at the start of each turn, then either there was some sort of bug, or it was a special mode that changes the normal rules of Magic.


4

You can use those cards as lands, as long as they are clearly those basic lands. The tournament rules on acceptable cards says Artistic modifications are acceptable in sanctioned tournaments, provided that the modifications do not make the card art unrecognizable, contain substantial strategic advice, or contain offensive images. Artistic modifications ...


3

You are probably ok to use those lands legally in a tournament. For marked cards: "A card or sleeve is considered marked if it bears something that makes it possible to identify the card without seeing its face, including scratches, discoloration, and bends." So any writing on a basic-land (not on the back) would be fine as long as it is not ...


4

Yes, evasion abilities such as Flying only affect the declare blockers step. Once blockers are declared, flying no longer makes any difference. 500.3a An evasion ability is an ability an attacking creature has that restricts what can block it. Evasion abilities are static abilities that modify the declare blockers step of the combat phase. If a creature ...


3

Your Prossh will be a 7/1 green snake creature. The different effects are applied in the layer system order. First layer 7b is applied: Any Power/Toughness setting effects Then layer 7c is applied: This covers all effects that modify Power/Toughness so long as they don’t set P/T to a specific value So first the effect changing your Prossh into a ...


5

No, 'commander-ness' is an intrinsic property of the card that nothing can take away. 903.3. Each deck has a legendary creature card designated as its commander. This designation is not a characteristic of the object represented by the card; rather, it is an attribute of the card itself. The card retains this designation even when it changes zones. ...


4

When you cast a spell with X in its cost, you decide how much X will be and then add that amount to the rest of the spell's cost when you pay it. When the spell resolves, you treat any "X" in the text box of the card as the chosen number. In the specific case of Strength of the Tajuru, you choose a number for X, then (assuming you don't kick it) you pay the ...


2

A cost that includes {X} is a variable cost, you can pick any value for {X} that you want and that number is used to determine the effect of the spell, exactly what the variable does is dependent on the text of the spell. For example, Blaze has a cost of {X}{R} and rules text that says Blaze deals X damage to target creature or player. so what you do when ...


2

It is still your opponents commander and they will get the Lieutenant bonus from the Marshal. This is because being a commander is a property of a card, it doesn't matter if the characteristics of the card have changed at all it will still be their commander. 903.3. Each deck has a legendary creature card designated as its commander. This designation is ...


12

No, for two reasons. Evolving Wilds' ability has the tap symbol in its cost. If it is already tapped, then you can't pay that cost, so you can't activity the ability. Worse, you can't even tap it for 1 colorless mana in the first place! Evolving Wilds has no ability that lets you tap it for mana whatsoever. You can tap basic lands for mana because the ...


0

In case you were confused, the X in Strength of the Tajuru's cost is unrelated to multikicker. If you need help understanding that mechanic, see What does X mean in a spell's cost?. Now, to understand Multikicker, it helps to understand Kicker first. Kicker Kicker is an extra cost that you may pay when you cast the spell. If you choose to pay the cost, ...


2

First, in order to understand how Multikicker works you have to understand how Kicker works. What Kicker {cost} means is that when you cast the spell (before you do anything like choose targets or determine cost) you decide if you are going to 'kick' the spell, if you do you pay {cost} in addition to any other costs of the spell, and it will have a different ...


9

Spiteful Visions would trigger once for each card drawn, so if you cast Divination to draw 2 cards it would trigger twice and you would be dealt 1 damage for each trigger, and CoP:Black would need to be activated twice to prevent all the damage. Anything that triggers off of this damage would then trigger once for each time the artifact triggered. This ...


1

The official announcement of any rules changes is made in an article on Wizards' Magic site. This article is generally posted the week of a set's pre-release event (Khans of Tarkit Update Bulletin), or in the case of products that do not have pre-releases like the Commander 2014 decks the set's release date. Occasionally they are a little late for example ...


7

Regenerate will not save the creature. The state based action that moves the creature to the graveyard in this case does not technically destroy it. 704.5f If a creature has toughness 0 or less, it’s put into its owner’s graveyard. Regeneration can’t replace this event. Even if regeneration could replace this kind of death, the creature would simply ...


3

If it's a permanent, it's a valid target for "target permanent". Period[1]. You cannot untap a permanent that's not tapped. 701.17b To untap a permanent, rotate it back to the upright position from a sideways position. Only tapped permanents can be untapped. This has consequences[2], but not for Tamiyo. 609.3. If an effect attempts to do ...


2

You are looking at two different things here: costs and effects. Earthcraft and Crackleburr both require you to tap untapped permanents (or untap tapped permanents) to activate their abilities. If Earthcraft allowed you to tap a tapped creature to untap your a land, then with just one creature you could untap all of your land forever. For the other two, the ...


4

You cannot untap an untapped permanent to pay an "untap" cost, exactly like how you cannot tap a tapped permanent to pay a "tap" cost. 107.6. The untap symbol is {Q}. The untap symbol in an activation cost means "Untap this permanent." A permanent that's already untapped can't be untapped again to pay the cost. However, Tamiyo CAN use her first ability ...


1

Since nothing but the sacrifice tries to move the Martyr, the Martyr would still be on the battlefield if it wasn't sacrificed. The Martyr was sacrificed, so the cost was payed, so your opponent gains the life[1]. The effect of the sacrifice was modified by Athreos, but that doesn't matter. Along the same lines, your opponent would still gain the life if ...


0

They will still gain life. This is because sacrificing the Martyr is sacrificed and once that happens the ability doesn't care what happens to her. What happens is your opponent activates the Martyr's ability, sacrificing her, paying the mana, and revealing white cards from your hand. Once they've done all of that the ability goes on the stack. After it is ...


3

Your opponent does still gain the life. Nothing in the ability says that the Martyr has to be in their graveyard to gain the life. The sacrifice cost was paid, and once the ability was on the stack, it existed independent of the creature card (CR 112.7a).


5

Let's go through this step by step: I use his ability to create the X tokens. Then, I play a Progenitor Mimic targeting Krenko. When the Legend Rule takes effect, I sacrifice the original Krenko. So far, so good. A minor detail is that the mimic doesn't actually target, but that's beside your main question. You currently have an untapped Krenko with a ...


4

When you “sacrifice 3 creatures” as a cost, are they sacrificed one at a time? No. "Sacrifice 3 creatures" only has one keyword action. This differs from "Sacrifice a creature. Sacrifice a creature. Sacrifice a creature." When a payment consists of more than one action, those action aren't performed simultaneously as per the rule you quoted ("in any ...


1

The reason that rule 601.2g exists is for payments with multiple parts. Take for example Birthing Pod, it has a payment that includes mana, tapping the pod, and sacrificing a Creature. 601.2g says you can pay the costs in any order, so you can tap the pod first, sacrifice creatures second and pay mana last. Or what ever order you want to, I cannot think of ...


0

On Teysa's gatherer page, there is a single ruling that says You may sacrifice Teysa itself to help pay for its first ability, but unlike other white and black creatures, it won't cause its second ability to trigger. Any other white and black creatures you sacrifice to pay for the first ability will cause the second ability to trigger. This means that ...


2

Yes, if Teysa, Orzhov Scion and 10 other black creatures all die at the same time, you get 10 Spirit tokens. Rule 603 covers how triggered abilities work: 603.6c. Leaves-the-battlefield abilities trigger when a permanent moves from the battlefield to another zone, or when a phased-in permanent leaves the game because its owner leaves the game. These are ...


0

Yes, you will get the 10 tokens. This is because of the same reason given in the answer to this question. 603.6d Normally, objects that exist immediately after an event are checked to see if the event matched any trigger conditions. Continuous effects that exist at that time are used to determine what the trigger conditions are and what the objects ...


2

303.4b The object or player an Aura is attached to is called enchanted. The Aura is attached to, or “enchants,” that object or player. Since Nyxborn Eidolon has no Auras attached to it, it's not Enchanted. More importantly, it's not enchanted by Spiteful Returned. Spiteful Returned's triggered ability only triggers when Spiteful Returned or the ...


6

In addition to the answer you've already gotten, I want to point out that Spiteful Returned doesn't say 'another enchanted creature'; it specifically uses the phrasing 'when enchanted creature attacks'. This refers to the creature that Spiteful Returned is enchanting, and that creature only; if you have Spiteful Returned in play and, say, a Bloodcrazed ...


0

They only lose 2 life. Spiteful Returned is a creature with Bestow. This means that when you cast it you have the option to pay its Bestow cost and when you do that you cast just like an Aura picking a Creature for it to Enchant. When it is an Aura the Creature it is attached to is the "Enchanted Creature", it is never an "Enchanted Creature" if it is not ...


3

No, an artifact creature is specifically a creature that has "artifact" written in its type line. See Platinum Emperion for an example; it specifically says "artifact creature". A creature could also become an artifact creature through an effect that says it changes the type, such as Mycosynth Lattice. But attaching an equipment to a creature will not affect ...


4

In both cases, the result is the same: the new control effect overrides the old one. This is because Magic uses a timestamp system: whenever there are effects that modify the same thing (like control, or type, or color), the one that was created last and hasn't ended determines the final result. This is part of rule 613: Interaction of Continuous Effects: ...


1

You have Case 2 correct, but not Case 1. There's not any real difference between the two. In both cases, there is one continuous effect giving you control of a creature, and then you apply a second effect giving control to an opponent. In general, the most recent effect "wins out", and so you've given away your creature. The rules don't make a distinction ...


4

Not all enchantments attach to a creature (or any kind of permanent). In general, enchantments just sit on the battlefield like artifacts. Auras are special types of enchantments that do attach to things. They have a type line that says "Enchantment - Aura" and an ability in the text box that says "Enchant [type]," which means that it attaches to permanents ...


1

Yes you can use creatures with summoning sickness to pay for convoke costs. Summoning sickness means: 302.6. A creature's activated ability with the tap symbol or the untap symbol in its activation cost can't be activated unless the creature has been under its controller's control continuously since his or her most recent turn began. A creature can't ...



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