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2

When you search ci:gur on magiccards.info, you are looking for cards that match that color identity, i.e. that are legal in a deck with whose commander has a GUR color identity, including artifacts. When you append the m, it appears to search for cards that have more than one of those colors in their color identity. So, in that context, when you are looking ...


1

They don't interact at all. The word "target" does not occur anywhere in the Comprehensive rules for 702.19, Trample, nor 510, Combat Damage Step (well, the latter does use the word "target" within some examples, but those uses refer to spells being cast, not to the combat damage itself). The Comprehensive rules for Hexproof are short enough to include ...


4

No. Unless specifically stated otherwise in the ability text, or they could only function from another zone (such as in Flashback), abilities of creatures, lands, artifacts, etc., only work while they are permanents, i.e. when they are on the battlefield. Also note that Ostracize does not even target creatures, it only targets opponent players, so it could ...


1

To double any type of counters, you place an additional number of counters on the permanent equal to the number of counters that are already on the permanent. By definition, to "add" a counter, is to place an additional counter. Thus, to place an additional counter, is to "add" a counter.


3

Your opponent would deal at least 5 damage to your blocking creature and up to 3 damage to you. Hexproof prevents your opponents from targeting your creature and you in this example, but hexproof doesn't stop other things from effecting your creature or you. Things target only when they say the word 'target' on them (and Aura spells on the stack), other ...


2

Each spell that you cast has a mana cost associated with it. Whether creature, instant, planeswalker, or any other, they all have a mana cost. (Lands aren't spells, so they're treated different, but that's a topic for a different day.) You must have mana in the necessary amount and type to cast the spell as indicated in the top right corner of the spell. If ...


-4

If, however, Narset also is enchanted by Curiosity (as well as DS), she will count as dealing combat damage to a player twice, so you would draw two cards.


-2

For the record, I have not played in a few years. If you are playing with friends than anything can go, if they are ok for it. Tournament rules are still as follows, "Players may have a sideboard of up to a maximum of 15 cards, and exchanges of cards between games are not required to be on a one-for-one basis, so long as the player adheres to the 60 card ...


-8

First of all, there is a little rule everyone is forgetting and it is the legal target rule which simply states before a permanent can be destroyed or removed from play it has to be a legal target of a spell: 608.2b [During resolution, if] the spell or ability specifies targets, it checks whether the targets are still legal. All spells target, ...


10

If I play Krenko Mob Boss and retain priority [...] First, let's clear up this confusion. If you cast Krenko and retain priority, then Krenko has not resolved. You need to wait until after Krenko resolves, at which point you will have priority because you are the active player. Now, after Krenko resolves, you decide to equip Swiftfoot Boots to Krenko. ...


1

Krenko will be returned to your hand. However it should be noted that you cannot cast a Swiftfooot Boots on any creature, you need to have already cast the boots then pay the equip cost to attach them. Priority doesn't seem to work the way that you think it does, the Unsummon does not happen at the same time as the Equip, it happens in response to it. If ...


1

Casting a spell uses the stack just like activating an ability does. Your opponent will get an opportunity to respond with Unsummon. Because Unsummon is instant speed, it can be cast when there are other items on the stack. However, casting an artifact spell or equipping a creature with equipment is a sorcery speed action and therefore can only be cast on ...


4

In general, the mulligan strategy is unchanged: you should mulligan when the expected outcome for a mulligan is better than the expected outcome otherwise. The effect of the new rule is in giving a boost to the expected outcome for a mulligan. As the rules currently stand (the new scry after mulligan rule will not be implemented until the Battle for ...


3

I play with a large group of people (5+) when we play Planechase, and we have a runnning rule: after 2 null rolls, you flip a coin and call it for either planar or chaos. While it assures an eventual result for spending the mana, it also limits the ability to spend it freely to achieve a result by placing a 50% chance at the end, which can be devastating. ...


3

As others have said, yes, the ability will exist twice on each of your Sliver creatures, and each of those creatures will trigger it twice upon attacking. In what situations would a creature be allowed to have two copies of the same ability (if ever)? There is no limit to the number of copies of the same ability a creature can have. They are each ...


8

You must decide before looking at your first hand of the game, it can be after sideboarding. If you do not choose it is assumed you will play. From the Magic Tournament Rules 2.2: For the first game of a match, the winner of a random method (such as a die roll or coin toss) chooses either to play first or to play second. The winner must state this ...


0

As an answer to your main question, see Diego's answer. In response to your P.s., yes shroud only prevents the creature from being targeted - nothing else. For example Clone, Wrath of God, Diabolic Edict, Prahv, Spires of Order, Sovereigns of Lost Alara, Quest for the Holy Relic and Bolster do not target creatures and all work against or with a creature ...


3

You can draw 2 cards. When you cast an Aura spell, then 2 separate triggered abilities will trigger. You choose the order in which to put them on the stack (the order doesn't matter in this case), and then you will have 2 separate instances of "you may draw a card" on the stack, which will resolve one at a time.


11

It depends on how you are enchanting the creature. If you are casting the spell then no, you cannot enchant a creature with shroud. This is because aura spells target while they are on the stack. 114.1b Aura spells are always targeted. These are the only permanent spells with targets. An Aura’s target is specified by its enchant keyword ability (see ...


3

Suppression Bonds is an Aura and as such, it targets as per the following rule: 303.4a An Aura spell requires a target, which is defined by its enchant ability.


5

No, it can't. Only cards that explicitly state that they can return something from exile can do so. Examples are very few. Riftsweeper returns an arbitrary face up exiled card to library. Misthollow Griffin can be cast from exile. Torrent Elemental can be brought back from exile. Pull from Eternity returns an arbitrary face up exiled card to it's ...


8

Karakas' ability: Tap: Return target legendary creature to its owner's hand. Karakas returns a creature. Creatures only exist on the battlefield, everywhere else they are usually creature cards (or spells, on the stack). 109.2. If a spell or ability uses a description of an object that includes a card type or subtype, but doesn't include the word ...


-5

Yes. THis is possible. You can also use cards in your hand


4

As far as official rules are concerned, it's certainly a misconception. The right to concede is unaffected by the state of the game or the number of remaining players. A player conceding can absolutely affect the game for the remaining players in a multiplayer match, but there still is no official rule anywhere that restricts your right to concede at any ...


7

As you have shown in your question, it is a house rule. That said, it's not a particularly surprising house rule as generally the kind of concession this would arise in could easily be a jerkish move, though not necessarily. 104.3a A player can concede the game at any time. A player who concedes leaves the game immediately. He or she loses the game. ...


3

To post as an answer what was hashed out in the comments, there is no card that will do what you want at this time. Any available cards have restrictions (like Compost) or result in other things like life loss.


3

Just add Painter's Servant to your combo of Sphinx's Tutelage and Compost. With Painter's Servant in play, every card your opponent mills will be Black and cause a Compost trigger. So as soon as the Sphinx's Tutelage trigger first resolves, your opponent will mill (at least) 2, netting you two more draw triggers, causing 2 more sphinx triggers, leading to ...


1

Your 4/4 creature will deal 4 damage, and then it will deal 4 damage again. If you attack with a 4/4 creature that has double strike, and it gets blocked by two regular 4/4 creatures, the following will happen: First Combat Damage Step Your attacker deals a total of 4 damage to the first blocker. The opposing blockers assign no damage. The first ...


5

Creatures always deal damage equal to their power. Creatures with double strike do this twice. Specifically, a creature with double strike deals damage equal to its power once during the first strike damage step, and once during the regular combat damage step. Creatures with first strike deal damage just once during the first strike damage step, and regular ...


7

A creature being tapped or untapped is completely independent of who controls it. When Lose Calm resolves, you become the creature's controller and the creature untaps if it was tapped. Then you can do whatever you want with it, including attack with it. After that, once your turn ends, the creature returns to your opponent's control, in whatever state it is ...


11

You do not pay the cost twice. The part in parentheses is called reminder text, and doesn't actually do anything it just reminds you how Outlast works. The card would function exactly the same if it read "Outlast {1}{B}" 207.2a Reminder text is italicized text within parentheses that summarizes a rule that applies to that card. It usually appears on the ...


4

You misunderstand. Everything in the parenthesis and italics is just reminder text. Outlast {1}{B} means {1}{B}, {T}: Put a +1/+1 counter on this creature. Activate this ability only any time you could cast a sorcery. So you only pay the mana once.


0

If you want to mirror official drafting as closely as possible - either because you are practising for a tournament or you are interested in experiencing the format as designed - Then here are the things that you should be aware of. 1. Magic drafts are booster driven When a draft starts, you get 3 boosters, each of which has 1 rare, 3 uncommons and 10 ...


8

112.2c Each paragraph break in a card’s text marks a separate ability. 603.1. Triggered abilities begin with the word “when,” “whenever,” or “at.” Dromar's triggered ability is all one ability. It resolves all at once. "If you do" is not a separate trigger phrase. Dromar's ability triggers. Dromar's ability resolves. Follow the instructions of ...


5

Your interpretation #1 is correct. Whenever a combat phase starts, you name all the creatures that you want to attack with (or have to). Then if the player (or controller of the planeswalker) you attack has an untapped AoT, you determine the total mana costs (1 per creature that is about to attack), then you choose whether or not to pay the mana costs. If ...


2

When these abilities trigger, they go on the stack, and regardless of whether you choose to pay the optional cost, all targets are chosen. On resolution you choose to pay the cost, mana abilities do not use the stack and can be activated as part of the resolution of the spell. You do not have to fill your mana pool before the ability resolves, you can fill ...


-7

If you go on Amazon, you can find a box set of 1000 random cards for around $20, as well as a box of 500 basic lands (100 of each color) for around $15. Later this year (around Fall Break) I plan to host a Random Card Draft using these. Basically, I will shuffle them, separate them all by rarity, and dole them out into "packs" with each pack containing 1 ...


2

Just adding to Rainbolt's answer since I can't comment. If the creature is not leaving play then the counters will stay. If you activate a Mutavault or Sarkhan, the Dragonspeaker and then are able to put +1/+1 counters on them those counters will stay there even after they stop being creatures. They will just be irrelevant to the cards new status as a land ...


3

No. 506.4b Tapping or untapping a creature that’s already been declared as an attacker or blocker doesn’t remove it from combat and doesn’t prevent its combat damage. You need something that specifically removes it from combat, like Maze of Ith. Actually causing it to leave the battlefield will also stop its attack, even if it comes back right away.


6

does it remain in exile or go to the graveyard? Neither. It's moved to the stack when you cast it. From there, it will go to the graveyard on resolution (or upon being countered) as normal. If you exercise the option to Rebound a previously-exiled Staggershock, you cast Staggershock. The first step of casting a spell is to move the card from the zone ...


3

When you cast the spell a second time off rebound (from exile), it ends up in your graveyard. This is actually one of the Gatherer rulings on Staggershock: If you cast a card from exile this way, it will go to your graveyard when it resolves or is countered. It won't go back to exile. If you have a closer look at the reminder text (emphasis added): ...


3

It is the second one. Because your creature has a power of 6, you can deal a total of 6 damage during combat. If you are blocked by 2 creatures, you can choose how to divide that 6 damage between the 2 blocking creatures (though you you have assign lethal damage to one of them in order to also deal damage to the other). You don't get to deal 6 damage to each ...


4

The latter. Each creature deals damage equal to its power to all blockers, attackers and defending players or planeswalkers, not to each of them. Simultaneously, The 6/6 deals 4 damage to the 4/4[1]. The 6/6 deals 2 damage to the 2/3. The 4/4 deals 4 damage to the 6/6. The 2/3 deals 2 damage to the 6/6. Shortly after, when State-Based Actions are ...


3

It will affect all your creatures for as long as you control it; whether those creatures were there when you first cast it or not. Your creatures will lose the bonus as soon as you stop controlling it. This is called a static ability, which generates a continuous effect. It's described in detail in this rule: 604.2. Static abilities create continuous ...


5

The second one. Damage that you do to a creature lasts until the end of a turn, and then it wears off. So you can do it 2 damage first with Swift Kick, then after that do it 1 damage with normal combat damage.


3

You are overthinking it. Two creatures fighting each other as result of a spell or ability means exactly what it says, and nothing more. Power and Toughness of a creature are always one certain value, namely the printed base value plus all applicable modifiers. Two creatures fighting each other is NOT combat, and combat-related abilities don't matter. The ...


2

Once blockers are declared, any player can then play instants or effects before any damage is applied. In your particular case, no, your creature does not take damage. It would only take damage if the blocking creature was still in play, and Ride Down destroys it. You are incorrect on the other portion however. The Trample keyword lets any damage above ...


2

There's no conditional on that effect, except "At the beginning of the end step". Roughly speaking, any effect is going to apply only when the card is in play, "on the battlefield", unless the effect specifies otherwise. So the effect takes place when it says it does, roughly at the end of the current turn. Not when it dies or is exiled. Since the card ...


4

No, it's definitely not a rule yet. (As of August 9 - will update this answer if anything changes.) In fact the Latest Developments column on August 7 said: We will be looking at both how the Pro Tour played out, as well as the reactions from the players regarding the rule. I don't know when we will have a decision based on this, but we hope to have new ...


4

Any enchantments or counters that were on the creature when it was face down will remain when it is turned face up. The creature never changed zones. It is still the same object. Morphs and Manifests have the "Creature" card type, but no subtypes. 701.31a, 702.36a It becomes a 2/2 face-down creature card with no text, no name, no subtypes, and no mana ...



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