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2

No, it does not keep the +1/+1 counters. Specifically, rule 121.2 says Counters on an object are not retained if that object moves from one zone to another. The counters are not "removed"; they simply cease to exist. See rule 400.7. and rule 400.1 says A zone is a place where objects can be during a game. There are normally seven zones: library, ...


0

Each other player always means every player that is not yourself, not to be confused with alternating players. I've not come across a card that says this but I think this is what is confusing you? Cards usually use each other player to signal every opponent http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=grave+pact, and target opponent to signal ...


0

You need to clarify what you mean by 'cool'. It is fun to use older cards, however, it is only allowed in some tournaments. If you are going to play with friends (called "Casual Magic") then you should build decks with any cards you have. If your cards are too powerful, then your friends will complain. If your cards are too weak, then you might find ...


14

You are correct, these cards are not in booster packs. For the past few years, Wizards has put out 30 card sample decks to introduce new players into the game. This year they decided to put into these packs a number of reprinted cards not actually present in M15: see here for decklists. Like the article mentions, the Deck Builder's Toolkit for M15 also has ...


1

These are cards which you can get in the M15 learn to play packs. You can get these at your local (WPN) game store, but are mostly given to players which are new to the game.


9

"Other creatures you control" means "Creatures you control which are not this object." Chief of the Edge further restricts things by only affecting Warriors. If the ability did not affect creatures with the same name, it would read something like "Creatures you control not named "Chief of the Edge"..."


1

You are right, they give each other +1/+0 as it says on the card. But not the the Armament Master. because this is of type Soldier, not warrior.


11

You untap your artifacts during player two's untap step, player three's untap step, and player four's untap step. This isn't anything that's in the comprehensive rules or anything, it's just the meaning of the words on the card. "Each other player" could be explained as "each player who is not you" or to be really clear "every single player who is not you". ...


3

There is no hard guarantee that a booster will contain X creatures, or X sorceries, or X red cards. However, the contents of a booster aren't completely random either. Instead, the commons in a booster are heavily influenced by the set's common print runs. Print runs are easiest to explain by example, so let's look at the print runs for Born of the Gods, a ...


0

Generally it seems as though exact statistics are unavailable, though there are lots of booster/draft simulators available online to help you get a feel for distribution. The best resource I found for booster pack setup has been over at MTG salvation and via Wizard's own Booster Draft Simulator. In general, from playing around with it, it seems as though ...


7

What happens to a spell after it's been cast is not affected by where it was cast from. It's the usual rule about cards being by default "reset" whenever they move from a zone to another. Unless the spell itself (e.g. Pull from the Deep, White Sun's Zenith...) or another card (such as Rest in Peace) says it doesn't go to the graveyard, that is where it ...


8

No, Sarkhan's ability does not trigger enters-the-battlefield abilities because he is already on the battlefield. He changes type and gains abilities but he is still the same object. An enters-the-battlefield trigger is what is called a zone-change trigger. Rule 603.6a describes these triggers: Enters-the-battlefield abilities trigger when a permanent ...


3

Okay, I think I've found another solution. first, when it's your turn, play Alchemist's Refuge, and then when it's your opponent's turn, you activate it, and flash in Genesis hydra for at least 4. Since it's your opponent's turn, your trigger goes onto the stack last, and resolves first.Then, genesis hydra would have to find a notion thief, and it ...


1

This is the general rule: when the same event triggers multiple triggered abilities, the controllers of the abilities decide what order to place them on the stack, in APNAP (active player first, then non-active player) order (rule 603.3b). In your example, you get to choose. If you put the Sphinx's ability on the stack first, then Narset's resolves first, ...


8

Let's walk through this. Our starting state is: Gnome is enchanted by Colorless Pledge. The following events occur: You cast a second Pledge, targeting Gnome Pledge resolves and attaches to Gnome The state of the board is now: Gnome is enchanted by Colorless Pledge and White Pledge. Gnome has Protection from White (except Colorless Pledge) and ...


13

Once the second Pledge enters the battlefield, the first one again starts granting protection from white to the Gnomes, which causes the second aura to fall off. This happens as a state-based action just after the second Pledge resolves.


3

See Kevin's answer: the second Pledge causes the first to also grant protection from white. If somehow both Pledges are colorless, and then both stop being colorless at end of turn, then my original answer applies: Both Pledges will go to the graveyard, for exactly the reason you state. As soon as the Gnome's effect ends, state-based effects are checked ...


9

601.5. A player can’t begin to cast a spell that’s prohibited from being cast. So you are exactly right


3

First, a recommended article about singletons in general: http://www.starcitygames.com/magic/misc/15002-Sullivan-Library-One.html In this specific case, the cards you mention are all cards such that the deck never desperately needs to draw them; the player might think "I want a land that taps for white mana" but probably not "I want Ancient Den." They may, ...


7

The lands that that deck only has one of are generally nice to have if you can get it, but not clearly better than the alternatives. The deck is entirely white, so Cavern of Souls' second ability is only useful to generate white mana, and that mana can only be used to cast creature spells of a predetermined type (probably Human, given the makeup of the ...


3

18 lands, including all the on-colour heal lands you can get and all the tri-lands in at least 2 of your wedge's colours. Then add banners according to deck speed and colour balance. The thing to consider with trading Banners for lands, as with any colour fixing rock is "what happens if you don't hit the mana on time". Between morph and delve, Khans is a ...


0

Not specific to KTK, but my rule of thumb for limited environments has been to count non-zero cost mana sources as half lands, with a limit of about 1/3 my land count total reduction. For instance in your example I would count 1 of those banners as a land. So 16 lands, 17 creatures and 5 other spells plus the two banners. Note as a word of caution that I ...


4

Since you control the source of both triggered abilities, you choose the order they are put on the stack (and then they resolve in reverse order). If your opponent also has abilities triggering at the same time, he will do the same. The active player (the player whose turn it is) puts their triggers on the stack first, followed by the triggers of all of the ...


9

From that same page (emphasis mine): Creatures turned face down by Ixidron are 2/2 creatures with no text, no name, no subtypes, no expansion symbol, and no mana cost. "Creature type" is a shorthand for a creature-specific subtype (205.3m in the Comprehensive Rules). Face-down creatures have no creature type, so Coat of Arms does not affect them.


1

Is it this one? It was found pretty fast by me just by googling "magic playmat blue". It is the art of glacial fortress so if you google that you probably find places where you can buy it.


5

Mana fixers can virtually never be counted as full lands because you need mana to cast them. Let's take the case of the banners specifically. If you swap out a land for a banner, the main difference is the banner: Costs 3 mana to cast Can be sacrificed for a card draw (1) makes them a higher mana screw risk than a land (how happy are you if you mulligan ...


4

No, you cannot, because the card specifically states that each copy targets "one of those creatures." So the target for the copy is specified in the rules of the card itself, there is no option to choose a different target. Arc Lightning is the same, but Liquid Fire works a little differently. With liquid fire, there is only one target, the creature. How ...


9

Bribery and Collusion do not really factor into this. If there is no agreement (or offer) to exchange something of value for a particular match result, there is no bribery. "Collusion" is not inherently illegal in the absence of bribery (No rule says I can't concede to my friends because they're my friends.) You are running afoul of 'Unsporting Conduct - ...


0

The rules of Magic itself don't allow for players to change the win conditions. Win/lose/draw conditions are defined in the rules, and unless a tournament director decided differently, you have to play by the win/loss/draw conditions written in the regular rulebook. (And at an official MTG event, the tournament director wouldn't allow otherwise).


0

Hope this answer could still help someone, this article (an update a decade later to a previous article on the same subject) talks a lot about why exactly bad cards are printed—and it's from the source!


2

Some cards target a creature and affect that creature's controller, so it some sense they behave differently depending on who controls the target creature. Here is a magiccards.info query for such cards. Of course, since Ink-Treader Nephilim makes those spells target every creature anyway, it doesn't really matter who controls it. Since Ink-Treader ...


5

Yup, unfortunately you're right. Unblocked means attacking and unblocked, after blockers are declared. This is in the comprehensive rules for the declare blockers step: 509.1h An attacking creature with one or more creatures declared as blockers for it becomes a blocked creature; one with no creatures declared as blockers for it becomes an unblocked ...


3

You can use any black- or white-bordered version of any card that is legal in your format, including basic lands. For example, Naturalize was printed in Magic 2015, so it is standard legal, but you can also use your Onslaught Naturalize and it will be perfectly legal. Tokens are not considered Magic cards by tournaments: they don't go in your deck, or in ...


6

Yes. If a card (e.g. "Island") is allowed in the current format, you may place any print of that card into your deck. You can even use a print of a card whose text has since been changed in Oracle. The text in Oracle always overrides the text on the card. The cards much match the following criteria: The card is genuine and published by Wizards of the ...


3

Question 1: No. Creature spells (such as Living Totem) don't target. When you cast Living Totem, you do not pick any targets. Once it eventually resolves, it's ability triggers and you choose targets when you place it on the stack. But placing an ability on the stack is not casting a spell, so it doesn't trigger Staunch-Hearted Warrior's ability. Aura ...


1

No. Living totems has a triggered ability that adds +1/+1 counters, which triggers upon him entering the battlefield. That is not the same thing as 'casting a spell that targets Staunch-Hearted warrior', so the Staunch-Hearted Warrior's heroic ability will not trigger. However, if you target the Staunch-Hearted Warrior with an enchantment, then bounced it, ...


2

I would buy enough of the Duel Decks for each player to have one. Even though each set is not balanced against the other sets, they are going to be the best value you will find for pre-built decks from wizards. They have a very reasonable power level for the most part. Wizards is releasing the older duel decks in December as part of an anthology- it might ...


9

This ability is a static ability. The important rules from that page say 604.1. Static abilities do something all the time rather than being activated or triggered. They are written as statements, and they're simply true. 604.2. Static abilities create continuous effects, some of which are prevention effects or replacement effects. These effects are ...


3

The first part of (c) in your question is essentially the answer: Since this effect has no cost and no trigger it is a static ability, it applies at any time as long as Rageblood Shaman is on the battlefield. So the answer to (a) is yes, a Minotaur that enters play after the Rageblood Shaman has +1/+1 and trample. And the answer to (b) is that yes, if ...


4

Apart from Exile Effects; the Other things that can deal with indestructible creature-lands: -X/-X abilities like Nightmarish End, Lash of the Whip Sacrifice abilities like Dead Drop Bounce effects like Whelming Wave, Peel from Reality, and Aetherspouts Polymorph effects like Turn to Frog and Polymorphist's Jest (although I think you'll have to kill ...


5

Any card that says "Exile target creature", "Exile target artifact", or "Exile target permanent" will remove an animated Darksteel Citadel. Cards that do this include Devouring Light Pillar of Light Ashen Rider Chained to the Rocks Curse of the Swine Excoriate Fade Into Antiquity Gild In addition, if it's toughness ever drops to 0, it will die as a state ...


3

When viewing your collection, click the quantity button and then move the left slider to 0 to show cards you don't own. Once you see them you can just doubleclick them to add them to your deck.


2

No, it's no longer supported. They announced on June 26: ... we'll be turning off access to the current Magic Online client (aka V3) on July 16. And on the day of posted this update. (And of course, if you try to download it, you can only get the new version - that ought to be a pretty good sign too.)


-3

To "die" and "put into the graveyard" are the same thing (See rule 700.6). In this case I think Emrakul's ability does not trigger. 700.6. The term dies means “is put into a graveyard from the battlefield.” It is used only when referring to creatures.


1

Cards are printed on four different sheets: Basic Land, Common, Uncommon, and Rare. (Mythics are printed on the Rare sheet.) The number of times a card is printed on the sheet determines how rare it is relative to other cards on the same sheet. For most sets (Alliances and afterward, plus Ice Age), all cards of the same rarity level are printed the same ...


5

The Magic tournament rules have this to say (emphasis added): 3.9 Card Shuffling Decks must be randomized at the start of every game and whenever an instruction requires it. Randomization is defined as bringing the deck to a state where no player can have any information regarding the order or position of cards in any portion of the deck. Pile ...


3

You are not supposed to be "ensuring" that you get a good hand on the first draw. Theoretically, each player should start the game with their deck in a random permutation. Any 7 cards should be a possible starting hand. Rule 103.1 says At the start of a game, each player shuffles his or her deck so that the cards are in a random order. Each player may ...


2

The list of sets legal in any format can be found in The MTG Tournament Rules, Section 6. The sets legal for Standard, in particular, can be found at this rules page. Historically, a block rotates out when the block after the following one is introduced, and a core set rotates out when the block after the following core set is introduced. However, Wizards is ...


1

WoTC has a tradition of reorganize/changing their webpage, so I cannot guarantee this link will work consistently in the future, but they generally post it on their webpage someplace (I found this using Google + "mtg standard format") http://magic.wizards.com/en/content/standard-formats-magic-gathering Standard format uses the two most recently-released ...


5

It depends on what format you want to play. Casual You can use whatever cards you want, as long as your friends are alright with it. This is informally known as "kitchen table magic", at least in my area. Some casual formats are are so popular that they have their own rules, such as Commander. See the link at the bottom for more information. Standard ...



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