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8

I feel there are two major differences: Go and chess are strictly strategic, whereas mahjong involves chance, In go and chess, everyone has complete knowledge of the game at all times; in mahjong you don't know what your opponents have. Mahjong is kinda of like poker or gin rummy in these ways; they more strongly depend on reading your opponent. So, in ...


6

Good but inexpensive set: Decent weight bakelite or similar plastic pieces, readable "engraved" (molded, really) figures. I've a set I paid $15 for back in 1988; it's got a few thousand hands on it (I used to play a full game of 16 hands every week, sometimes more than one), and it's still in great shape, but the vinyl over cardboard snap case is about ...


6

I've played Mahjong online through Yahoo. But, there usually aren't that many players on their server. Yahoo also have solitaire Mahjong games, if that's what you're referring to. You could also try MahjongExpress. I've never played on there, but it looks like it requires you to install software, kind of like the online poker games.


5

The simplest ruleset is Hong Kong Old Style (HKOS). It has simple scoring and very few special hands. Other forms may have few special hands but complex scoring - or simple scoring but many special hands to learn - or complex scoring and many special hands to learn (like American Mahjong). If you want even simpler rules, have a look at these ...


5

This set of rules for Chinese Mahjong might be a little terse, but are essentially the rules I have always played with. The last chart gives a nice limited set of honor hands too.


5

Furiten is when you are unable to win on a tile due to certain circumstances. There are about 3 different circumstances. One type of furiten is when you previously discarded a tile that you needed to complete your hand. Let's say if you go for a hand without honors, 1s or 9s(a hand called 'tanyao', worth 1 han), and you have a double wait of 3 or 5 circles ...


5

According to the mahjong wiki: Furiten in riichi mahjong is a state in which a player has discarded a tile that would have otherwise completed his hand. A player who is furiten cannot win on an opponent's discard, but can only win by self-drawing the needed tile. This rule is the crux of riichi mahjong. This is why all discards and melded sets are ...


4

A friend notified me of a site he occasionally plays on: http://tenhou.net/ According to him, it's a nice site. Problem is that it's entirely in Japanese. He's lucky enough to understand Japanese but most people don't so I added this answer just for reference. Update: I found a nice site where you can play (only) against the computer. English language, no ...


4

"Dead hand" has a few different meanings. It's hard to tell just from that one sentence, but it sounds like the one you're describing is the case where somebody forgets to take a tile, so their hand ends up short tiles (it's also a dead hand if the player forgets to discard and thus has too many tiles). A dead hand cannot be used to win the round, but the ...


4

Like you said, you can't shuffle your tiles at will, but if I'm remembering correctly, you can put the tile you just drawn anywhere in your "hand", so you can't know when the discarded tile was drawn (at least not if you haven't a perfect memory ;) ). However, each player has his own discard location, so you can easily see all tiles he has already discarded ...


4

http://www.sloperama.com/mjfaq/whereg.htm has all the answers you need. Tips For Buyers Caveat Emptor. When you see an attractive mah-jongg item for sale, make sure it's really got everything you need. How many time have I heard, "I got a wonderful Chinese-style mah-jongg set but it doesn't have enough tiles," or "I got a wonderful ...


4

Tom Sloper, an apparently very experienced American player, writes about etiquette. It turns out that "One person's bad etiquette is another person's official rule" - so you have to adapt. There is a huge difference between tournament play and casual games with friends. Also, you need to consider house rules. In the end, there is a definite answer to your ...


3

Shogi is an excellent suggestion, being similar to Chess yet having the Asian origins that Go has. If you want to go for the more western games, Draughts or Checkers are closer to Chess than Mah Jong. The 5 in a row "Go moku" is also a fun, if simple game. It can be played with a standard Go set.


3

Your understanding is correct. Yakuhai (役牌), also known as Fanpai (飜牌), is a 1-han yaku consisting of a pon/kan of any of the following: Dragons (elements) Your current seat wind The current round wind (typically east or south) As it is a yaku, it will net you the 1-yaku minimum required to complete your hand. It doesn't matter if the ...


3

Not sure I know what a 'made hand' is. Are you asking what are the odds of being dealt the Nine Gates? If yes, the odds are about 5000:1 in a 136 tile set. This page has a combinatorial treatment of the 13 orphans vs the Nine Gates.


3

Based on this source I would say that those are the only ones.


2

I'm generally a fan of Riichi Mahjong, but what I use for teaching beginners is Zung Jung, a very simple and logical ruleset. See the scoring chart here - it's easy to apply (no "small points" and "multipliers", only one limit), and the point values are adequate to the effort required for a given pattern. At the same time, you can find most of the commonly ...


2

According to this table, Hong Kong, Classical (Babcock's red-book rules), and Korean variations fit your criteria. Having said that, this page state that Korean rules don't use seasons.


2

I found a basic answer on my question over here: Try to go out waiting for multiple tiles (not just one). Imagine that you have three complete sets and two pairs. Imagine that one pair is 2 Bams, and you draw a 3 Bam from the wall -- which tile do you discard now? In this situation, many experienced players will discard a 2 Bam, keeping ...


2

I wrote a program to simulate mahjong hand dealings. It's not verified yet, but so far, the ratio appears to be around 1 in 100,000 games.


2

Generally, most people will organize their tiles in some fashion. By watching both were they put the drawn tile, and where they pull their discard from, you can draw inferences on what they have in hand. By looking at their set of discards, coupled to their hand organization you can often tell if they've changed hand goal mid-hand. (For example, starting ...


2

In all types of mahjong except Riichi-mahjong, the tiles are discarded into the pool at the center, usually in no particular order. If you have a very good memory, you can remember what tiles were discarded by whom. From this, you can gain information about what kinds of hands your opponent might be going for. For example, if your opponent discards a 5 of ...


2

Well, the good news is that you are not in Furiten. The waits on that hand are 2-char, 5-char, and 8-char, and none of those have been discarded by either player, so Furiten does not apply. What you DID fall victim to is the yaku requirement. That hand does not meet the requirements on account of it being open. It would need to be a concealed hand for a win ...


1

It doesn't look like you're in furiten. However, in riichi mahjong, a hand also needs at least one complete yaku (multiplier) before it can be completed, and I'm not seeing one in your hand. If your hand were still closed, you could easily supply the needed multiplier simply by calling riichi. However, calling riichi requires a closed hand, and since ...


1

I'll be assuming you're playing Riichi, that's the only ruleset I know which has "dead hands". If I understand your question correctly, I don't see why she would declare your hand dead at all in this situation. I take it you declared Riichi in that game. If she called you dead because you could not win, since she kept your winning tiles, that is not a ...


1

Warning: not exactly familiar with the term Riichi, nor with the specific Mahjong ruleset Riichi Mahjong (Henceforth, RMJ). In the books I've read, and the 3 different published rulesets I've played (One of which was a 1960's Japanese rulebook translation), the functional definition of "on the first turn" is "without having discarded." Having just read ...


1

Riichi Mahjong has a one-yaku minimum before you can complete your hand. While tsumo gives you a yaku if the hand is still closed, it won't give you anything if you've already opened your hand by calling melds. For further details, you can read the related answer here: Why couldn't this hand win with ron? Your hand, as it stands, doesn't have any yaku. ...


1

I kept searching for the past few days, but the only thing I found was tenhou's logging feature. It basically lets you replay previous hands, so you "only" need to find strong players and links to their hand records. I do not yet know how to do that. Example: http://tenhou.net/0/?log=2008120919gm-0007-7447-xc9f52854acf6&tw=3. It starts with some ...


1

In some variants you have hands like Knitting (seven cross-suit pairs), Thirteen Grades of Imperial Treasure, and the Wriggling Snake. This page matches the rulebook I learned from. It describes several others such as Windy Chows, Dragonfly, Heavenly Twins (a special case of All Pairs), Run Pung & Pair, and Red Lantern. I believe most of these should ...



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