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10

The resource track in Power Grid leads to some interesting decisions. If you haven't played it, the resource track has costs increasing left-to-right while the resources are replenished from right-to-left. This has a few interesting effects: Resources in demand tend to cost more. You can get resources on the cheap if you have a power plant type no one ...


9

When trying to make something new, it is not a bad idea to see what award winning games have already done. You may wish to see the game Dixit (Spiel Des Jahres 2010) which has a simple system to let 2 to 4 players simultaneously choose between 3 and 5 options. The 2 option variant is Oltarus's method. Dixit also has wonderful artwork. The expansion Dixit ...


9

I feel that most board games favour clearer rulebooks over short sentences, so they'll often tell you the number to deal based on the number of players. If you prefer a shorter sentence: Shuffle and deal out all the cards evenly amongst the players. Set aside any leftover cards - all players should have the same amount. If you wanted to go with ...


6

Fundamentally, the OGL exists to (1) allow D&D 3.0 supplements to be made by 3rd parties and (2) to ensure the 3.0 Dev Team could take their mechanics with them if they got fired. (1) can be seen in the explosion of material in 2000-2002.(2) can be seen clearly in Pathfinder and Arcana Unearthed. While mechanics can't be copyrighted, and the US Patent ...


5

If the choices are always the same (Always YES/NO, for example), the simpliest ways to do that are the following: Each players has two cards, one saying YES, the other one saying NO (Or whatever choice you have). They make choices by playing a card face down and revealing them all at once. Each player has a coin of some sort that can be placed in one's ...


5

The standard methods: Cards - don't worry about scratches - many serious players sleeve cards these days. It's the most familiar choice. And if the cards are business card sized, they can be hidden in hand or under a hand on the table. Spinners - not used all that often, however, the mold marks on the back of the spinner may be visible if using the ...


5

Attributes that I use to evaluate games: Replay value (Over time how much do you enjoy it) Randomness (how much it's out of your hand) Learning curve What kind of skill does it require (strategy, resource management, deductions, spatial orientation, etc) Time required to set it up Expected time to have a game Time-ness (is it per turn? all at the same ...


5

I thoroughly enjoy games that force players to interact with each other. If players have to directly interact with each other in order to advance in the game, I find that rather fun. It lets you get to know your friends better, and encourages them to talk. I enjoy resource trading in games likes Settlers of Catan immensely. While there are only a few ...


5

Not sure how applicable it is, since it doesn't have an actual physical card-based implementation (and ergo isn't strictly on-topic for this site), but Alteil is a (free) online game based on CCG deck-building mechanics. Decks are built of thirty cards, limited only by a maximum of three copies of any given card. One card can be played each round, and this ...


4

The decision is obviously localized to the game and requires a significant amount of background to answer objectively. The important distinction between the two is this: diminishing returns is easy, but amplifying returns is hard. When you have diminishing returns, you introduce two elements. The first is resourcefulness (no pun intended). If you can ...


3

IMHO letting players set up their decks pre game in a CCG is a bad idea. First of all, Magic has the shuffling for a reason. One of them is porviding randomness to the game and giving the players the chance to work with what they got. Without that, all of the actual game would be happening in the metagame. Knowing what your opponent plays and in what ...


3

It all depends on what you want your players to do. Diminishing returns tells your players that you want to be the first to do this, and you don't want to do a lot of it. As soon as I have H2O in hand, I want to make water before anyone else does. Once it's been done, I don't want to do that unless I have to because other plays are more valuable. ...


3

Oh! I was thinking about this for a while, and couldn't come up with many good games; I can't believe I missed the family of Icehouse games Zarcana, Gnostica, and Zark City. Zarcana was, I believe, the second game ever designed with Icehouse pieces (or at least one of the very early ones after Icehouse itself). It is played with an Icehouse stash per person ...


3

Carcassonne is a tile laying game where each player contributes to the same board while placing tokens to control different zones. Farms Cities Roads Cloisters It is very easy to learn and there are a plethora of expansions that add a huge variety of different mechanics if you wish to make the game more challenging.


3

I particularly like the strategy cards from Twilight Imperium. At the beginning of a round, everyone chooses a strategy card that gives each player a different special ability for that round. On your turn, one of your options is to activate your special ability. Most cards also come with a secondary ability that the other players can execute at that time. ...


3

This is meant as a response to Chad, but the comment field wouldn't hold it all: @Chad I am not a lawyer, but I have done a bit of reading on copyright and this does not seem right to me. It would be hard (not impossible) to patent a traditional board game, though some modern ones can involve some patented technology. While it is strictly true that game ...


2

I'd recommend using a coin or a single card. They would both work the same - the player chooses a side and lays it on the table, facing up. Since there is only one card, you don't have to worry about them being recognizable by scratches. (Which, at its essence, is a mostly negligible problem.) A similar system for multiple choices would be using a die. The ...


2

Some random additional axes: Theme Aesthetics Quality of construction/bits Shape of the luck/skill curve Accessibility Concrete vs. Abstract Time/difficulty to master Coop vs competitive Experience/immersion factor Cost Expandability Customizability/variations Compactness for travel Table-space required for play Number of players Age level suitability ...


2

I might recommend Carcassonne - it has a slightly different take on builder placement, while relying primarily on tile placement. The game board itself will be different every time, as you're drawing and placing random tiles every turn. Play itself goes quickly after your first playthrough, and there are several different strategies toward victory. With ...


2

I like the way Tigris and Euphrates allows a user to sabotage someone's game plan. In games like Brass, I have been in situations where a player has built a link that has blocked me off from building, due to the way coal must be shipped to the location. Therefore, If I was able to blow up the rail link, and build over it, I think this would add an extra ...


2

Sim City the Card Game: the cards form a city grid. Phil Foglio's The Works card game: it forms a network of sorts; it's also not a great game. Carcassonne (already mentioned by others) creates a network of interlocking features; most of the related games likewise require continuing a given feature across boundaries. one owns features on the map, said ...


2

The wording "All creatures who dealt damage this turn return to owners hand" is a little off. You could find the virtually identical Return all creatures that dealt damage this turn to their owners' hands. "Return." There's no duration. It's something that happens there and then. When it resolves, all creatures that dealt damage earlier this turn are ...


2

I have not crunched any numbers for "proof" but experience and a quick sort through the monster deck would tend to support your supposition. Rogue hit numbers are notably lower than the Cleric's and their secret doors special power is not good enough to compensate, especially given that it's not reliable and can be replicated with certain treasure cards. ...


1

Since the idea of the retreat system is to prevent you from passing a chamber by not killing a monster, we always play that you must go back the way you came. In case a trap brought you to a chamber you probably had no intention to pass that chamber anyway, since you did not mean to go to that chamber. So passing without killing a monster is not relevant in ...


1

Now I do not know of an official ruling, but in this instance my group has always practiced that retreat is not the same as return. That is to say the rules are telling you, that you are to no longer occupy the same chamber/room as the monster, not that you must go back the way you came. I have not played Dungeon! but I have played New Dungeon which was a ...


1

I would suggest Mansions of Madness. With one change to the rules. The rules currently have the keeper draw threat for the number of investigators that started the game. This would have to be modified to be the number of players currently playing the game instead of investigators. This way the threat accumulation would be accurate to the amount of players. ...


1

Trajan has you playing a round of Mancala each turn to decide what action you take, with bonuses for accumulating the correct colored pieces in certain locations.


1

Space Alert is a cooperative game in which you plan out your entire sequence of moves while trying to communicate with other players about the moves that you are making and the moves that they should make. It uses very similar parts of your brain as RoboRally, with the exception that you're communicating about what each other are doing rather than trying to ...


1

Another family of games, that do involve constructing a network but in a slightly different way, would be Fresh Fish and Alien City (BGG). I haven't played Fresh Fish, so I won't try to describe it, but Alien City has been described as an adaptation of it, as they share some of the same basic mechanics. In Alien City, a game played with a Piecpack set and ...



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