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42

My understanding is that the best three property groups are light blue (Angel Islington, Euston Road, Pentonville Road), orange (Bow Street, Marlborough Street, Vine Street), and dark blue (Park Lane, Mayfair). Light blue is good because the buildings are very cheap but give excellent returns. Orange is good because the likelihood of landing there is ...


27

It's important to note that there's a direct relationship between the near-ubiquitous Free Parking and no-auctions rules and people's perception that Monopoly is a game that takes forever to play. The playing time of Monopoly is a function of how fast people run out of money, which is a function of a) how quickly all the properties get sold and developed ...


22

"Anyone can bid in an auction, including the one who declined the option to buy it at the printed price." Also, more official rules PDF. From other forums I have visited, it seems as though most people do not play by the rules, the entire rules, and nothing but the rules...


18

Original answer You collect $200 each time you pass over or land on the GO. See the official rules. Each time a player's token lands on or passes over GO, whether by throwing the dice or drawing a card, the Banker pays that player a $200 salary. "The $200 is paid only once each time around the board. However, if a player passing GO on the throw of the ...


17

The rules state: When the Bank has no houses to sell, players wishing to build must wait for some player to return or sell his/her houses to the Bank before building. and Houses and hotels may be sold back to the Bank at any time for one-half the price paid for them. and All hotels on one color-group may be sold at once, or they may be ...


17

While the free parking rule mentioned by LittleBobbyTables is quite common, there are a lot of other house rules people use in Monopoly. I know we never used the auction rule when we've played Monopoly, and that keeps property available much longer, since when someone lands on a parcel, it isn't necessarily sold. Wikipedia has a great list of house rules ...


17

Settlers of Catan For adults, I would suggest Settlers of Catan, since it's a much better game to me and a lot more fun to play. If your willing to play a full game of Monopoly, then Catan is a prefect fit since it's actually shorter. There's also a much more nuanced trade mechanic, and a board to stack our your share of. I see it as a great chance to ...


16

According to Kaz Darzinskis' Winning Monopoly: Buy from the bank any property that will give you ownership of two properties in any monopoly group, unless you already own a killer monopoly. (I believe he refers to a killer monopoly as being the New York group and up, though it's been a long time since I read the book and could be wrong.) The ...


16

A while back some friends and I had played a few long, boring games of Monopoly in a row. Before we gave up on the game entirely we decided to try one more game with strict adherence to the rules. Not only was the game fun, but it was over in 45 minutes. Two common house rules break the game in the following ways: Free parking money (free $500 and/or using ...


16

It appears you have the Championship Edition (or the Mega Edition or some other recent modified version), which includes a "speed die" (that third die) for speeding up the game, though it's definitely not part of the original game. There are two "bus" faces, and one "Mr. Monopoly" face. I found these rules on Hasbro's site explaining how it works. The PDF ...


15

No, you only collect $200 dollars, not $400. From the official rules: Each time a player's token lands on or passes over GO, whether by throwing the dice or drawing a card, the Banker pays that player a $200 salary. The $200 is paid only once each time around the board. You only land on GO once, so you only get one payout. The message on the card ...


14

The utilities are decent "fire and forget" properties, which pay for themselves quickly. Think of them as equivalent to owning two railroads, but paying a bit better because you can't improve them further. They don't have the same explosive-growth potential of railroads or properties, but they're cheaper. You're not going to bankrupt anyone with them, but ...


13

Sounds like a house rule to me. http://richard_wilding.tripod.com/monorules.htm claims to be a copy of the rules from the official rulebook. The section on Buying Property reads only: Whenever you land on an unowned property you may buy that property from the Bank at its printed price. You receive the Title Deed card showing ownership. Place the ...


13

The usual ruling is that if you are threatened with bankruptcy (you've landed on a property and don't have enough cash), you can only make trades with other players if they will allow you to avoid bankruptcy. If you can't avoid it, the bankrupting player gets everything you owned (cash and property) at the instant you landed on them, after selling ...


13

Yes, you can only downgrade a hotel to a number of houses if that number of houses is actually available in the bank. If there are no houses, you must sell the entire hotel outright. This fact can be used strategically: If there is a shortage of houses, players should consider buying the last houses rather than buying hotels because each hotel built ...


12

Monopoly by the rules I'd suggest playing Monopoly with no house rules to keep the game competitive and short. No bonus given for landing on Free Parking No restriction on when properties can be bought, e.g. not until one trip around the board. No building houses or hotels if the bank has none to sell. They're meant to be a limited resource. Auction ...


11

I don't think there is a quick method, but there are a few simple rules to consider when trading your cards. 1) How much is the card worth to you. Therefore, what can you do with the money you gain as opposed to what could you do with the card you are selling 2) How much is the card worth to your opponent. If you are selling a card that allows an opponent ...


11

You didn't lay out criteria in your question so I'm going to assume that what you're asking is: Let's say Bob diligently acquires as much skill as possible in Monopoly and practices with 50 or more games. If Bob plays several beginners (10 or fewer games - little study of the game), and no players know other players' skill level - is Bob highly likely to ...


10

There are two main features in the calculation. The first is to compare the sum of the (hotel) rents with the cost of building. Since the second "set" in each row charges higher rents without higher building costs, we will compare only the four second sets. The rents appear first, then the costs: Boardwalk Park Place ($3500, $2000) =1.75;dark blue ...


10

From the official rules (emphasis mine): BANKER… Select as Banker a player who will also make a good Auctioneer. A Banker who plays in the game must keep his/her personal funds separate from those of the Bank. When more than five persons play, the Banker may elect to act only as Banker and Auctioneer. As many people who play auctions in ...


9

Unimproved properties, railroads and utilities (but not buildings) may be sold to any player as a private transaction for any amount the owner can get. However, no property can be sold to another player if buildings are standing on any properties of that colour-group. Any buildings so located must be sold back to the Bank before the owner can sell any ...


9

One reason comes to mind: Keeping the game short. Monopoly is noted as a long game; when played by the rules as written, it's not overly so — 1-4 hours. there are points, especially on the first circle through, where the players will not have enough cash to buy everything at mortgage cost, especially Boardwalk and Park Place. the auctions are to get as ...


9

Puerto Rico is an economic game but it's hardly purely capitalistic. While you can trade goods for money, you get at least half if not more of your victory points by shipping goods, and each type of good is worth one victory point regardless of value. However, I'm not sure what you mean when you say Catan is capitalist. It's a pre-capitalist barter ...


8

Acquire I am surprised no one has mentioned this classic (back in print as of 2008) which is quite thematically similar (paper money, real estate). Except, it is shorter, more strategic, and has no dice rolling (but still some randomness from tile drawing). It is also pretty easy to learn.


8

You would likely be more concerned with copyright law rather than patent law in this case, especially given that as you have noticed, the patents have expired. There is something of a precedent for what you want to do. In 1975, Ralph Anspach made a game called Anti-Monopoly (which, by the way, is a pretty interesting game - we owned it, and at the time, as ...


8

The official rules are here. I can see nothing in the rules that would explicitly prevent one player offering immunity to another player. You only have to pay rent if the owner of the property asks you for it: The owner may not collect the rent if he/she fails to ask for it before the second player following throws the dice. However, you could argue ...


7

Whenever we played, we used the following house rules: No auctions. You have to land on a property to buy it. Free parking jackpot. Any taxes, payments from chance or community chest, or payments to get out of jail get put in the middle of the board. Anyone who lands on free parking gets it. That's the way I played it with everyone growing up. I also ...


7

I actually do have a couple of quick methods that I use when offered a trade, and the one I use depends on the stage of the game we're in. Early game The first few trips around the board. No one has a monopoly, most color groups have 1-3 properties available. Do the properties contribute toward possible monopolies equally? (If she has an orange, I'm not ...


7

The official rules don't state if you are able to sell properties at any time (in fact, it is one of the few rules that don't have the timing explictly stated), but I wouldn't put too much faith that this wasn't an oversight. Unimproved properties, railroads and utilities (but not buildings) may be sold to any player as a private transaction for any ...


7

It says right on the card (emphasis mine): if BOTH Utilities are owned, rent is 10x the amount shown on the dice Also, from the Monopoly rules: No rent can be collected on mortgaged properties or utilities, but rent can be collected on unmortgaged properties in the same group. The player who mortgages property retains possession of it ...



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