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13

No, they cannot change who they are attacking. Once a creature has been declared as an attacker you cannot change who (or what) it is attacking. Say instead of attacking Player B directly you attack their Planeswalker, but before damage gets dealt they Boomerang the Planeswalker back to their hand. You would not be able to redirect your creatures attack to ...


11

The original rules for Elder Dragon Legend Wars had the following as part of the rules: players choose (or select at random) an Elder Dragon Legend as their army's leader. The dragon must be supported by creatures and spells corresponding to each of the Dragon's three specific casting colours. Players designate and announce three of their creatures as ...


10

Your combo will not work for two reasons. Cloudstone Curio never triggers. Cloudstone Curio triggers when a nonartifact permanent enters the battlefield. Pierce Strider is an artifact, and so it will not cause Cloudstone Curio to trigger. You must choose another permanent. Cloudstone Curio says you may return another permanent. "Another" in this case ...


9

Assuming nobody has any poison counters before Bruna attacks, Bruna's controller will lose the game assuming that her power is at least 10, but less than 20 when she deals damage, and it will be a draw if her power is 20 or greater, if her power is less than 10 her controller will have poison counters equal to her power. This occurs because Shining Shoal ...


9

The correct interpretation is the second option. You have satisfied the condition, and Llanowar Elves ends up in its owner's graveyard. This is because rule 117.12 says Some spells, activated abilities, and triggered abilities read, "[Do something]. If [a player] [does or doesn't], [effect]." or "[A player] may [do something]. If [that player] [does or ...


8

No, only your own original commander counts. Generally, if the Lieutenant ability refers to your Commander, then the opponent's Commander would not count, since it's not yours, even if it has the same name. Also, a clone of your Commander would not count, because the Commander-ness of a card cannot be copied. 903.3. Each deck has a legendary creature ...


7

No, 'commander-ness' is an intrinsic property of the card that nothing can take away. 903.3. Each deck has a legendary creature card designated as its commander. This designation is not a characteristic of the object represented by the card; rather, it is an attribute of the card itself. The card retains this designation even when it changes zones. ...


6

Yes. Cackling Counterpart and Battlegrowth are in Bant colors and combo with Enduring Scalelord. Can you teach me how to search for cards myself? Introducing the Gatherer's advanced search feature. We know that Enduring Scalelord goes infinite with itself. Let's try to find a clone in Bant colors. Here is what I started with: Color: Does NOT contain ...


6

Is it my commander? To reiterate what is stated in the question, your commander is always your commander, and nothing can change that. This is because of the following rule: 903.3. [...] This [commander] designation it is an attribute of the card itself. The card retains this designation even when it changes zones. Does a commander deal commander ...


6

I just discovered that this exact circumstance is described in the rules. It will remain your commander. 903.3. Each deck has a legendary creature card designated as its commander. This designation is not a characteristic of the object represented by the card; rather, it is an attribute of the card itself. The card retains this designation even when ...


5

There are 2 reasons it doesn't work. One, even though it is a creatures, it is also an artifact, so it fails the nonartifact clause. Second, Curio also says "another permanent", meaning you can't bounce the permanent that just entered the battlefield.


5

The simple answer is because they didn't exist yet. The origins of the Commander (or Elder Dragon Highlander) rule set date back to 1996, as discussed in this forum post. They've been modified many times by various people since then. So the real question is, why didn't the official Commander rules get modified to include Planeswalkers when they were ...


5

Yup, unfortunately you're right. Unblocked means attacking and unblocked, after blockers are declared. This is in the comprehensive rules for the declare blockers step: 509.1h An attacking creature with one or more creatures declared as blockers for it becomes a blocked creature; one with no creatures declared as blockers for it becomes an unblocked ...


5

No, you won't retain control. Your enchantment will fall off and go to your graveyard, and Marath will go to your opponent's graveyard or command zone. The primary reason is that when a creature changes zones, this rule kicks in: 400.7. An object that moves from one zone to another becomes a new object with no memory of, or relation to, its previous ...


4

No, you can't attack with those Sliver tokens the same turn you get them. In your combat phase, the following steps happen: You declare what creatures are attacking. Your opponents declare what creatures are blocking. Combat damage is dealt. Brood Sliver's ability triggers when a Sliver deals combat damage, so it is only in the Combat Damage Step that ...


4

If there's one thing you can learn from Mark Rosewater's "Making Magic" articles (check out the section on "Empires"), it's that the best way to find out if a deck is unfair and/or miserable is to play it. This may seem like something you could shortcut, but card evaluation is really hard, and cards or decks that seem oppressive at first glance may turn out ...


4

No, you cannot, because the card specifically states that each copy targets "one of those creatures." So the target for the copy is specified in the rules of the card itself, there is no option to choose a different target. Arc Lightning is the same, but Liquid Fire works a little differently. With liquid fire, there is only one target, the creature. How ...


3

I would guess that the commander specific damage would be to make combat-oriented commanders like Akroma, Angel of Wrath competitive with commanders with powerful abilities like Arcum Dagsson or Krenko, Mob Boss. By having it be commander specific, it prevents this from tipping the balance too far in favor of the combat oriented commanders in a multiplayer ...


3

All instances of the word "you" on an ability refer the controller of the source of that ability. 109.5. The words “you” and “your” on an object refer to the object’s controller, its would-be controller (if a player is attempting to play, cast, or activate it), or its owner (if it has no controller). For a static ability, this is the current controller ...


3

In addition to Mycosynth Lattice, there is at least one other way that I know of. When you cast a spell with the Convoke keyword, you can pay a colored mana cost by tapping a creature of that color. In order to pay a cost that isn't in your colors this way, you would need a somewhat elaborate setup. First, you would need to control a creature of the other ...


3

It simply checks the choice you made. 117.12. Some spells, activated abilities, and triggered abilities read, "[Do something]. If [a player] [does or doesn't], [effect]." or "[A player] may [do something]. If [that player] [does or doesn't], [effect]." The action [do something] is a cost, paid when the spell or ability resolves. The "If [a player] [does ...


3

I think group moderation is the way to go. Build the deck you want to play. If there are cards that look particularly brutal, maybe ask your group about them ahead of time. Otherwise, just play, and if something happens that ruins the fun for everyone, then adjust as needed. If you want to keep games from feeling "samey" every time, you could ban cards ...


2

In addition to the other suggestions here like getting feedback from your fellow players as you play, you can do a couple free-for-all games. In my play group that is mostly what we do and it's pretty easy to see who has the best board position at any given time (we all usually start conspiring to hurt that player's board, he is getting constantly attacked, ...


2

It is still your opponents commander and they will get the Lieutenant bonus from the Marshal. This is because being a commander is a property of a card, it doesn't matter if the characteristics of the card have changed at all it will still be their commander. 903.3. Each deck has a legendary creature card designated as its commander. This designation is ...


2

As you guessed, this little trick doesn't work. There are only two ways to activate an ability or cast a spell while another spell or ability is resolving, and your combo doesn't fall into either one: If the spell/ability that's resolving lets a player pay mana, that player can activate mana abilities. If the spell/ability currently resolving explicitly ...


1

The simplest way to get an infinite combo with Enduring Scalelord is to use another Enduring Scalelord (probably with a copy in EDH). Once you have that, any effect that puts a +1/+1 counter on any creature you control will set off the combo. When I'm looking for cards, I like to use magiccards.info, which has some very nice advanced search features. ...



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