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28

There's a popular fan-made format called Cube where you create a set of cards and people pick them for their decks, either by assembling virtual "packs" by grabbing random sets of cards or (more rarely) picking them one-at-a-time from the whole set kinda like how teams draft rookie players in professional sports. Because you tailor the card pool to your ...


19

Evan Erwin has an interesting article about learning to draft on Star City Games. He uses an acronym BREAD to remember the order you should be picking. Look for Bombs Look for Removal Look for Efficient spells. Look for Aggro (1-3 mana creatures to get in the early damage) Take the Dregs. I'd modify his acronym and make E also stand for Evasion. It's ...


14

Usually, my draft decks tend to aim for 16-17, 6-7 other spells, and 17 lands. Generally, if you end up with 19-20+ creatures your deck is going to be aggressive but insufficiently versatile. If you end up with 11 or fewer creatures your deck may have lots of "answers" but a shortage of ways to actually win the game. As ever, striking a balance is key. ...


14

Make sure you know the policy on rares - will rares be re-drafted at the end? Do you keep all rares you draft? Is it a 'winner-chooses' system? Most of the time you'll keep what you draft, but not always. Talking about the cards you're drafting is generally frowned upon - reading signals and predicting what your opponents are drafting is a big part of the ...


13

Conventional wisdom is to run around 40% lands in Limited. This means around 12-13 lands for a 30-card deck, and 16-18 lands for a 40-card deck. Typically, you see three variations. Aggressive, low-curve decks (which curve out at at four or five) will run as few as 11/16 lands. Typical decks (one or two colors, curve out around six or seven) will ...


13

Appendix B of the Tournament Rules provides required and suggested time limits for official events. Check this document for all the details you need. In general: Required minimum game time is 40 minutes. Recommended game time for typical Limited/Constructed Swiss rounds is 50 minutes. WotC recommends giving players 30 minutes to register and construct a ...


11

Normally drafts are restricted to a single block. In sanctioned drafting (with sealed boosters), the distribution looks like this: Core set, the first set of a block, or a "big third set" like Rise of the Eldrazi or Avacyn Restored: three boosters from the same set, e.g. M12 / M12 / M12. The second set of a block: one booster from the new set, two from ...


11

It depends on whether you use the official rules or house rules. In appendix B of the MTG official tournament rules (not the same thing as the comprehensive rules) it gives recommended time limits for sanctioned tournaments: Each pick has an associated time limit, which starts at 40 seconds and drops by 5 seconds roughly every two cards. The total time ...


11

"BREAD" is key, but there is another technique that helps a lot in most Limited formats: Draft archetypes, not colors. The theory behind "drafting archetypes" is that a great Limited deck, like a great Constructed deck, is defined by the power, consistency, and efficiency of all its cards working together rather than any individual piece by itself. In a ...


11

You asked ghoppe for "the generals of bombs and efficient spells". I'll try to add my 2p worth, taking that as a starting point for the answer. The thing to remember about all Limited formats is that decks aren't going to end up anywhere near as finely tuned as constructed decks. This goes doubly so for Sealed Deck, where you just have to reduce the ...


10

Creatures are what makes you win and what makes you lose games in Limited. Therefore I would consider the baseline types of spells for Limited not only creatures, but creatures + creature removals. Creatures with evasion are powerful in Limited, so sometimes the only solution to a sticky situation is a targeted removal. So, assuming a 23-17 distribution, ...


9

In my Innistrad drafts so far, I've noticed the following as dominating archetypes: Red-black vampires. This is a classic red aggro strategy, since there lots of small, fast vamps that get big to put a major hurt on your opponent, especially the Bloodcrazed Neonate and the Falkenrath Marauders. The bombs in this deck are the Bloodline Keeper or Olivia ...


9

You can draft at CCGdecks.com, tappedout.net, or drafts.in, and the free client Cockatrice is excellent for playing.


9

It's probably an error, as M12 only had 15 card booster packs (as can be seen in any online store catalog like this one). As far as I could find, the last core set to have smaller boosters was M11 with 6-card packs.


8

I think the question you should be asking is not "when to choose what colours I will play", but rather "when to stop choosing what colours I will play"? Magic, and especially Magic draft, is a game that favours the adaptable. When you make a first pick of a bomb in one colour, that does not commit you to playing that colour, but it suggests that you should ...


7

To be contrarian: in my experience, if you're adding a sufficient number of new people (which it sounds like is the case here), I'd encourage not handicapping them at all. My recommendation would actually be to start not with drafting but with some form of sealed-deck play (maybe a simple three-round league or the like), so that the new players have fewer ...


7

To provide a different perspective on thesunneversets' answer: the most important concept in cube drafting isn't power level, it's synergy. It's easy to look at your deck after you've drafted - or while you're drafting - and say 'this is chock-full of great cards, it should be awesome.' The problem is that everyone's deck is chock-full of great cards; to ...


7

You can use Magic Workstation. It works well and you always find player of different levels.


7

In my experience, Avacyn Restored Limited is less dependent on drafting clear archetypes than Innistrad. In particular: None of the colors have a super-strong identity associating them with one particular strategy. For example, you could draft small aggressive white beaters, or you could draft Seraph of Dawn and Angelic Wall to try to win on board control. ...


7

In my LGS it's solved this way. 6 players => 1 x 6 7 players => 1 x 7 8 players => 1 x 8 9 players => 1 x 9 10 players => 1 x 10 11 players => 1 x 11 12 players => 2 x 6 13 players => 1 x 6 + 1 x 7 14 players => 1 x 6 + 1 x 8 15 players => 1 x 7 + 1 x 8 16 players => 2 x 8 17 players => 1 x 8 + 1 x 9 18 players => 3 x 6 19 players => 2 x 6 + 1 ...


6

The key to Limited, like Constructed, is to build a deck with a gameplan. Your colors are a part of that, but not the totality of it: any given color can support multiple strategies, and focusing your deck around a particular strategy -- e.g. fast damage, 2-for-1 card advantage, evasive beatdown, just stalling long enough to drop your bomb, &c. -- is ...


6

The card itself states what to do in the case of a tie. In the example of Council's Judgement, it says "or tied for the most votes". This means that if 2 different permanents gets 1 vote each, then both of them will be exiled because they both are tied for the most votes. This is not only an issue in 2 players, but could occur with any number of players.


6

Not only are you allowed to share cards, you are as a team considered to have a single card pool that you build your decks from. Section 9.6 of the Tournament rules says Two-Headed Giant Limited Rules All the rules for Limited Tournaments (Section 7) apply, except as described below. The DCI recommends that each team receive eight boosters per ...


5

If you are on a budget, you probably don't want to buy any cards - by definition, for a Cube you need the best cards of all times. The power 9 alone would run you into the thousands of dollars. You do have 2 inexpensive options: Cube works with any set of cards, just take the best cards you have. No money involved, only time to decide on the cards. You don'...


5

I recommend just straight-up reading the MTG Tournament Rules. You certainly don't need to do all of this stuff for a "casual" draft, but it'll give you some good ideas about how to run things. As Two-Headed Giant draft is actually an officially supported format, the MTR includes specific guidelines on how to run it. DCI recommends drafting as a team, then ...


5

Wizards of the Coast designs sets for specific Limited environments. The intended draft format for Lorwyn/Shadowmoor block was: Lorwyn draft: 3x Lorwyn Morningtide draft: 2x Lorwyn, 1x Morningtide Shadowmoor draft: 3x Shadowmoor Eventide draft: 2x Shadowmoor, 1x Eventide Cards from the two halves of the set were not intended to be drafted together. ...


5

I had fun with Winchester Draft a couple of times. The article mentions Winston Draft, which I've never tried.


5

Since multiplayer games tend to run longer than single-player matches, it's hard to do as many rounds as you would for e.g. a standard pod of 8. The scheme we've come up with at my LGS is to run two rounds with swiss pairing and per-game prize support: Do the draft itself. For convenience, I'm going to presume a perfect 8-person pod here. Break into two ...


5

It is perfectly acceptable to observe other matches. If you are not currently playing, and you are not a judge, then you are a spectator by definition. There are a few rules governing spectators mentioned in the Tournament Rules. Players may request (via a judge) that you not observe their matches. You may not make notes while drafting. You may not place ...


4

Magicprinter.net should solve your problem. They are running code that is found here, in case you'd rather just run it on your own computer. Print off what you need and put it in front of land / commons. Hope this helps!



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