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28

Your mana base is the chief constraint, but it's not always as restrictive as you think. This really depends on the format and your budget, but, sometimes, it's really not "substantially more difficult to get the mana you need to play the cards in your hand" with a three-color deck. In something like 20 playtest games with Domain Zoo, which is (albeit ...


23

Basically, you're trying to find an optimal balance between "I need mana to play my spells in a timely fashion" and "I want to draw active cards all the time (which usually means spells)." For me, it boils down to a question of which lands drops do you need to make "on time". Because players start with an opening hand of several cards but subsequently draw ...


12

Fetchlands + duals is a formula used by almost all the top decks in every format that allows them. The main advantage is monumental consistency. Verdant Catacombs, for instance, can fetch any of the following original dual lands: Badlands (Swamp / Mountain) Bayou (Swamp / Forest) Savannah (Forest / Plains) Scrubland (Plains / Swamp) Taiga (Mountain / ...


11

Conventional wisdom is to run around 40% lands in Limited. This means around 12-13 lands for a 30-card deck, and 17-18 lands for a 40-card deck. Respectively, decks will typically to run 12/17 lands if running a typical two-color, standard-curve deck and 13/18 lands (if running a three-color or color-heavy cards). Mana fixing is always very imporant - ...


11

As an unscientific method for quickly throwing lands into a draft deck, I could up the number of coloured mana symbols in the casting costs of my cards, and use the results as a ratio to choose my lands. So, if my deck has 20 white mana symbols and 10 blue mana symbols, and I need to select 17 lands, I'd typically be thinking about 11 Plains and 6 Islands. ...


10

Because of the slower pace of play in EDH/Commander, it isn't as drastically important to hit 5-6 land drops in 5-6 turns. In addition, the number of "mana rocks" (mana-generating artifacts) and dual lands/mana filtering/land fetch cards are usually higher. Considering that, the 40% lands rule is still fairly close to normal (lightened obviously for the ...


10

No, you cannot tap non-basics for mana unless they have an ability that specifically says otherwise. Basic lands are handled with a special case in the rules: 212.6g The basic land types are Plains, Island, Swamp, Mountain, and Forest. If an object uses the words “basic land type,” it’s referring to one of these subtypes. A land with a basic land type ...


9

Generally it's less about whether your deck is aggressive or not than what your deck's mana curve looks like - the two are very closely correlated, but they're not necessarily the same thing! It's probably fair to say that the 'average' deck through Magic's history has run about 24 lands, with aggressive decks a little lighter and control decks a little ...


8

There are, but they are purposefully few and far between. Mana acceleration is considered to be in green's part of the "color pie," with the exception of the occasional black card, and a little bit of a fast-mana theme in red (formerly black). Blue and white occasionally get ways to cheat on mana a bit, but only when they're tied into some other element of ...


7

Building mana bases is a mix of art and science. Fundamentally, mana is the biggest resource constraint in a Magic deck, so your land choices are just as important as your spell choices during deck design. Deckbuilding isn't just about picking spells for your deck, but also about setting up lines of play. As such, your mana base isn't just about what but ...


6

There's no such thing as "Forest mana". Forest has only 2 meanings in MTG, it is a basic land type, and it is the name of a card. A card with the land type "Forest" (such as the Forest card), can be tapped for 1 green mana. Both "Forests in play" and "Forests you control" refer to cards (or tokens) with the type "Forest" that are on the battlefield. The ...


6

Solemn Simulacrum is good colorless fetch (and draw). Traveler's Amulet and Horizon Spellbomb can get lands into your hand. Caged Sun will get you lots of mana (but no lands) as will Koth of the Hammer. Iron Myr is a good mana producing creature Infernal Plunge and Geosurge can also have their uses. Fiery Fall is the only mono-red card that could be ...


6

When cards refer to "forests," they are always referring to the land cards and not to the mana they produce; when referring to mana, they specifically say "mana" or use the appropriate mana symbol (including X where necessary to be abstract). That means that in both cases, it is referring to the principle you are thinking about in your first statement. For ...


5

Short version: in the current Standard environment, play Sphere of the Suns if you want to play 4-drops early, play Koth of the Hammer if you want to play 6-drops early or get a lot of mana for a big X spell; make sure you don't short yourself on lands; if you want to experiment with a rogue deck, try Geosurge. Long version: In the modern color pie, red is ...


5

Mana ramp is definitely a very green thing; it's a natural effect for the color of life and growth (among other things). This is a great example of the color pie at work: there are just some things that not all the colors can do. But there are some cards outside green (and artifacts) that help produce mana. In other colors, mana producing abilities are ...


5

A good mana base is required to have a good deck. The question is, how do you want people to achieve this? Either they play spells that're easy to cast or they have good fixing. Duals are fixing without an extra slot or tempo loss. Worse fixers either cost cards or tempo. Like the lands earlier suggested (Evolving Wilds, Taplands, Shimmering Grotto (ugh)) or ...


4

Not at all. A quick Gatherer Search revealed at least 25 non-Green, fairly inexpensive basic land searchers (most $0.10 commons). Key cards of note: The Panoramas: Example Bant Panorama, Naya Panorama Terminal Moraine, Evolving Wilds, Terramorphic Expanse, Ghost Quarter, Oath of Lieges Artifact Searchers - Armillary Sphere et. Al. Basic Landcyclers ...


3

Alex P's answer is fantastic, but I think I can add to it somewhat. Limited: You mentioned limited in your answer, and in limited it is very frequently necessary or nearly necessary to play 3 colors to get decent cards. Of course even then your third color should often be a "splash" with just one or two cards and keep a heavy emphasis on the two primary ...


3

There are different strategies involved for 40 card decks versus 60 card decks. A 60 card deck is constructed. This means you'll have access to a great number of dual lands and land fetches. A 40 card deck is limited. You will probably have only basic lands to work with, with may be one or two mana fixers you managed to pick up. It's fairly easy to make ...


3

This is functionally a mono-color deck with some "color splash". You don't need any color but white early on, so you can forgo playing Scars-block "fast duals" in favor of the appropriate "buddy duals", which are Isolated Chapel and Sunpetal Grove. If almost all your other lands are Plains, it's going to be pretty easy to get them to always come into play ...


2

Mountaincycling Below is the card that sprang to mind when I read your question, and I didn't see it on OrigamiRobot's list so I thought I'd add it. It doesn't ramp, but it helps get you mountains in the early game when you need them, and can be played as a big red beatstick later on when you have enough lands - quite versatile! (There are other creatures ...


2

You would avoid nonbasic land if your group regularly sees .


2

I'll add just a little bit to what Alex and Timothy already said: multiple colours decks are playable with no huge problems, especially if you limit the cards with high casting cost in one specific colour. Several legendary cards have multiple colour casting cost and... they are there to be seen in play! I think multi-coloured decks are special fun when you ...


2

I think it depends on what type of cards you've included in your cube. I remember that the Invasion block had lots of mana fixing because they wanted to encourage multi-colour deckbuilding due to the Domain mechanic. On the other hand, Mirrodin block didn't require much (except for colourless splashable Myr) due to the artifact-heavy nature of the block. ...


1

White has very little ramp of its own; the effects it does have relating to mana are generally dependent on you controlling fewer lands than your opponent, and most of those put land in your hand, rather than on the field (which is not ramp). Examples: Land Tax, Kor Cartographer, Knight of the White Orchid, Oath of Lieges. Blue also has very little. ...


1

Here's a bullet-point list of things to consider: What's your curve look like? Which spells do you absolutely need to play "on time"? Does your deck have a way to look at more cards than one per turn (e.g. card filtering or card draw)? Can you win if you "brick" a few times, drawing lands you don't need? Do you have a use for "excess" land cards or other ...


1

I would advise against getting dual lands or shock lands. First of all, they are only good in decks where players are running those colors. If we assume everybody runs a 2-color deck of randomly chosen colors, there's a 10% chance that this card would be at all useful to them. Terramorphic Expanse/Evolving Wilds, Shimmering Grotto, and Manalith on the other ...


1

Everything is possible, YOU decide what is fun and how you want to build your Cube. Here is a detailed article on the basic of cube building. Basically, it depends on : Budget. Fetch lands and original dual lands are expensive Power Level. They allow to build more reliable decks than any other duals (that's a reason why Legacy and Vintage are more ...


1

The general rule of thumb is about 22 - 24 lands for most 60 card decks. Some decks can get away with less due to low curve (for example one drop zoo) and some may need more depending on the situation. Of course there are always extreme exemptions like char belcher which runs a grand total of one land or manaless dredge which runs none.


1

Another example that Alex P didn't cover is that adding another color can, in the right application, make your deck a lot more powerful. Consider all of the flackback costs in Innistrad and Dark Ascension. A decent amount of them are off-color of the main casting cost of the card. If you don't play the right colors, the card is a one-off. However, if ...



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