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4

Usually play in double-dummy problems (that is problems with all hands visible) is left as an exercise to the reader. The play in this problem depends on the opening lead. If the opening lead is not a diamond, it is ruffed in hand. A diamond is ruffed in dummy and a club played toward hand, where it is won as cheaply as possible. Another diamond is ruffed ...


4

The new way of notating - algebraic notation - has pretty much completely replaced the old way - descriptive notation. Most people nowadays use algebraic notation, except old players who are very stuck in their ways. However, there is still a purpose in learning descriptive notation: reading old books. Some of my favorite old chess books are only ...


3

FIDE is not the arbiter of chess-notation. By far the most common way to express promotion using algebraic notation is e8=Q (note that you do not write P for pawn, only the space it moves to). This is also the only style supported by PGN, the most widely used format for recording games on a computer. e8/Q and e8(Q) are also sometimes used, mostly by ...


3

According to Wikipedia's Pawn Promotion page, When a pawn moves to the last rank and promotes, the piece promoted to is indicated at the end of the move notation, for example: e8Q (promoting to queen). Sometimes an equals sign (=) or parentheses are used: e8=Q or e8(Q), but neither format is a FIDE standard. (An equals sign is also sometimes used to ...


3

I prefer Descriptive Notation, mainly because it's what I grew up with, and I can visualize the moves without the board (though not good enough to play blindfolded). I have to translate (at least in my head), when reading algebraic notation (and do that easier if I have a picture of a board in front of me).


3

It's much easier to work the game in your head with descriptive notation, so it's good if you're reading the game. Descriptive notation lets you know overtly which piece took which, like PxQ. Having said that, it's not used much anymore, you'll only see it in old references. Algebraic notation was adopted by FIDE because most of the world used it, so it ...


2

Right now, the closest thing to an "industry standard" for sharing games is video, using services such as Twitch TV and YouTube. This is how Wizards does event coverage and how many Magic writers share their games. Players often record their voice as they play or go back later and add commentary. Here is a fairly typical example. Magic Online keeps a ...


2

I still use descriptive notation, and I can read it, and I also have some old chess books with it. Algebraic seems to be used about everywhere now much more often; I play on the Internet Chess Club and that is all they use there. I put in a suggestion for them to have descriptive as an option but they haven't gone that way. It is like some of the other ...


1

For the sake of a concrete list of plays, I'll give one (with the leader listed). E DJ C2 DK D2 S C3 C9 CT S2 N D3 DT C5 DA S C6 CJ CQ S3 N CA S4 C7 CK N DQ DJ H3 HJ N D8 S5 H4 SJ N D7 S6 H5 SQ N D6 H2 H6 HQ N D5 H7 S7 HK N D4 H8 S8 SK N C8 H9 S9 HA N C4 HT ST SA In real life, North would show their hand after trick 4 and say something like: "I claim the ...


1

Not sure what your question is. Are you looking for a repository where hands are played to the last trick? There are plenty of repositories (check out the Vugraph archive on BBO), but in majority of the hands, you will never see the whole hand played out, but you will see some list of plays. Bridge players hate wasting time on the obvious, and for that ...



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