Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

It's not hard to prove that an unsolvable start exists. Just imagine a start where the only possible first moves would be moving cards to the extra cells. In some versions, -1 and -2 are examples of this though the only way to play them is to choose that seed. If you only count setups which can exist in normal play, seed 11982 in the Windows version is an ...


19

Get some card sleeves and card-stock. Write/print whatever you need to on the card-stock and cut it down to size. After you sleeve it they will all be shuffle-able and readable, just like normal cards. Admittedly this isn't good for much beyond prototype testing, but it's definitely fast and cheap. :D


17

When I shuffle I use a mixture of two techniques: riffle and stripping (as defined quite adequately in the Wikipedia article on shuffling). Riffle separates adjacent cards while stripping cycles cards from the top of the deck to the bottom. I use both because riffle alone will very slowly push cards in the bottom half of each cut down, but tends to leave ...


16

Your customer is right. Playing cards come in two sizes - poker size and bridge size. Poker size is 63.5mm X 88.9mm. Bridge size is narrower at 56mm x 88.9mm. This makes more sense in old fashioned imperial measurements - both are 3.5 inches high, but poker cards are 2.5 inches wide while bridge cards are 2.25 inches wide. What your customer is saying is ...


15

I have two different things I do for prototype cards. The first is just to use scraps of paper and sleeves, as outlined in the answer above (which I upvoted) - it's cheap, easy to swap in cards and stops you from over-investing time into half-baked ideas. After I have confidence in a design enough to bring it to outside play groups, I usually use stickers ...


15

Sounds a lot like Mao (which I was introduced to as Chairmen). It's a card-shedding game (i.e. like Uno) with secret rules that can vary by playing group. As the game goes on, more rules are added but not directly explained. The game typically goes on until everyone gives up. EDIT: Some sample starting rules might include these ones that are fairly common ...


14

I think the most generic names would be "Draw Pile" and "Discard Pile".


13

You could use common card protectors like people use to protect cards from trading cards games (Magic, etc). What your stuff in there (printed cardboard, paper-glued-on-other-cards,...) then becomes pretty much irrelevant. If not, what about photo printing services? Look for ones making postcards, you can probably easily fit 4 cards on a potcards and they ...


12

It's a common convention wherever cards are involved; the game doesn't have to be a traditional card game played with a poker or bridge deck. I think the convention evolved from the trick-taking family, especially Bridge, and the manners and social conventions thereof. Poker, and its emphasis on ensuring a clean deal, is another good possibility for the ...


11

That's very, very simple in fact: shuffle the discard pile constantly. Take a player that, while not playing his turn, shuffles the discard pile of cards. When discarding, simply give the cards to this player (who can change when he's tired), he will put them in the deck and go on shuffling.


11

For traditional card games the proper terms as defined in both Hoyle and Official Rules of Card Games are Discard pile Stock Drawing is the act of receiving cards from the stock. You can also see these terms used by Wikipedia while defining the rules for various games such as: Canasta Gin Rummy These are both Rummy-style games. One of the defining ...


11

I use custom SVG when designing playing cards. Inkscape uses SVG as its backend format. Coming from a web development background, I found SVG to be easier to learn than something like LaTeX. (It's just XML.) I have a single external CSS file and a Ruby script using the "builder" library to construct the SVGs from a database. If you don't want to use a ...


10

While it doesn't directly answer your question of where to get reusable playing cards, I have helped friends play-test card games before, and we have always just grabbed a handful of junk Magic common cards (because who doesn't have thousands of those lying around?), put them all into sleeves, and then slipped pieces of paper between the face of the card and ...


9

Artscow.com is the site I always hear about. I've never used it but it's constantly mentioned on boardgamegeek.com as the place to go for printing custom cards. See: http://www.artscow.com/photo-gifts/card/multi-purpose-cards-rectangle-394


9

To answer the question, there are a lot of plastics that are suitable for use as card sleeves. None of them use Bisphenol-A as a plasticizer or monomer; that particular chemical is used primarily to make polycarbonates, which while optically clear are generally too stiff for use as flexible sheets or films (though they're great for applications requiring ...


8

Honestly I'm just guessing here, but could they be Irish? Roughly an hour of Googling eventually brought me to these pages, which lists the names of the face cards in Irish Gaelic as follows: King: [R]í Queen: [B]hanríon Jack: Laoch (also [C]uireata)


7

There are several card printers online; you'll be running right near the quality bottom edge, after shipping. The other option is to use business card sheets, or to print to 3x5 cards.


7

VASSAL was made for precisely this: it's a game engine/website where you can build games, and then play the games you built online. There are a wide variety of existing games already built for VASSAL, but Muggins is not one of them. This will not be simple: you're going to need to learn how to program the game using VASSAL's editor. It'll take time and ...


6

Most card sleeves are made with Polypropylene (Type 5) which is unlikely to contain BPA. Plastic Containers Made with BPA Used in Food Preparation. Plastic containers have recycle codes on the bottom. Ingeneral,plastics that are marked with recycle codes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 are very unlikely to contain BPA. Some, but not all, plastics that are marked ...


5

I was poking around the other day looking for the same answer. Plaincards.com sells software to design your own cards and blank cards to print your designs on. Seems pretty cool, but it looks like you're limited to standard playing card sizes (i.e. no tiny Arkham cards). Their complete product line appears here. I'm not sure what size cards Bohnanza uses. ...


5

I've found that a slightly damp washcloth with a little bit of plain old bar soap on it works just fine -- don't use those goofy hand soaps with the beads or anything fancy in them. Lightly rub the cloth on the card, dry it off with another washcloth, and let it sit for a few hours. You definitely want to try this on one card first to make sure that ...


5

The article on Shuffling at the Wikipedia discusses the famous paper by Persi Diaconis and Dave Bayer which shows that a 52 card deck of cards doesn't become random until the fifth shuffle, and requires seven shuffles to become "truly" random. Your question "Are there any other methods of cuttings of the deck or shuffle types that create a more random ...


5

As commenters have pointed out, the copying that you are describing is illegal in most countries. This isn't legal advice (and it depends on where you're located), but a quick Google search about copying and protecting card games seems to suggest that you probably can make a copy if you don't directly copy the artwork or wording used in the original game. ...


5

Copyright concerns aside, I can help with the printing. I recently made a 100-card game (actually a Fluxx variant) like so: I printed out the cards in sheets of nine cards (onto standard A4 paper), then chopped them out with scissors. This might take a while if you've got too many, but 80 should be OK. To make them more sturdy, I bought 100 penny-sleeves ...


5

We have some house rules to make is faster and fun: Every time you ask if it's your turn you draw a card If you play an invalid card, you draw a card If the rest think you are taking too long, you draw a card. If someone plays a card that you also have in your hand, you can play it as well, but you need to be faster than the next player.


5

Make it so that it doesn't matter if players have faked their profile. Say having a high ranked profile means that you have access to better equipment (and therefore an incentive to produce a fake profile). You could reduce the impact of this by (say) introducing a handicap for high ranked players when playing against lower ranked players. If there is a ...


5

This is a very difficult question to answer, and its probably the reason that persistent, player power modifying changes are not included in most card games. one possible solution is a central online data store/mobile app This may be beyond your project, but one solution would be to implement some form of website wherein player profiles can be stored, this ...


5

When a shoe is shuffled (or reshuffled), all cards are shuffled, then the cut card is placed near the back of the shoe. This card is only an indicator that the shoe needs to be reshuffled at the end of the current hand. Thus, cards behind the cut card can and will be played into the hand. The purpose of the cut card's placement is two-fold: first, it's to ...


4

Although not a particularly cheap solution, you could use a service like Artscow to print off this redesign of Bohnanza: http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/239278/bohnanza-redesign-for-the-uppish-and-the-posh


4

With Ticket to ride, 3-5 riffle shuffles should be sufficient to randomize the deck sufficiently for play. As long as the runs of matched cards aren't 5-6 cards long, it's not a big issue. I'll note that japanese style block shuffling is inadequate for TTR until about the 9th or time through the deck, which I discovered due to using sleeved cards in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible