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2

For me, I would divide the deck into smaller parts that you can handle. Riffle shuffle (or any way you like) those and mix the small decks together, one group at a time.


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Yes you can play big 2 with more than one deck. I would recommend two decks for 6-8 players, three decks with 9+. (5 player is tougher, two decks is too many, one is maybe not enough, but I would err on the side on playing one deck for five players, unless you want a particularly wild game). Higher level hands such as 5 of a kind should be allowed. ...


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The old Macintosh computer game "Fool's Errand" contained a fun game within it that used the tarot trumps. During the adventure, at one point you'd encounter an old man and you would have to play this game against him and win. It was especially difficult because at first you didn't know the rules! You'd have to play it over and over until you started to ...


1

This is still exists in the Dujardin Prestige edition. Sold Here: http://www.jeuxdujardin.fr/mille-bornes-prestige.html Rules Here: http://www.jeuxdujardin.fr/files/regles/mille-bornes-prestige-regles-du-jeu.pdf In the section for Coup-Fourre: Note: pour se souvenir qu'on a fait un Coup-Fourre, on prend un jeton et on le pose devant soi.


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This is very similar to Skull. Skull has a fixed ratio of 3 red (roses) to 1 black (skull) and you only have to be correct twice to win.


1

I immediately had to think of a dice game called Perudo which according to Wikipedia goes by many names: Dudo, Cacho, Pico, Perudo, Cachito, Dadinho, Pirate's Dice and is a variant of liar's dice. No idea about the card game though.


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This is a variant of liar's dice, played with cards and using only the numbers ${0,1}$ instead of dice with ${1,2,3,4,5,6}$. On Wikipedia, the article with that name gives more detail.


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First, there are games where rearranging/peeking at the top cards is an inherent mechanic, so obviously, don't split and draw in those games. Furthermore, splitting the deck before drawing might be perceived as a hint that card backs are marked, and that you actually know which card is coming, and you don't want it. For those reasons, and the superstition ...


2

It's true that there's no statistical difference between a card taken from the top of a perfectly shuffled deck and a card taken from the middle of the deck. (Assuming that no one has already looked at the top cards.) The caveat is perfectly shuffled. Humans, in general, are rather bad at shuffling cards. For a standard 52 card deck, it takes about 7 riffle ...


2

As long as you draw the whole deck before shuffling discards, it doesn't matter. Simply put, all cards in a well shuffled deck are equal. (Or have an equal probability of being this or that.) Splitting the deck, drawing in the wrong order, or intentionally drawing from the middle of the deck, or even shuffling the deck between draws does not matter, if ...


12

Mathematically the probabilities are unaffected. Let's consider a simplified example with just 4 cards. Let's say we draw one card from the 4 aces from a standard deck of playing cards. The probability of drawing the Ace of Spades is 1/4. Now let's split the deck evenly and pick the first card from the first split to compare the probability of drawing the ...


3

From the Ticket to Ride official rules: Draw Train Car Cards – The player may draw 2 Train Car cards. He may take any one of the face-up cards or he may draw the top card from the deck (this is a blind draw). If he draws a face up card, he immediately turns a replacement card face-up from the deck. He then draws his second card, either from the ...


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If you are looking for a solution that is quick and does not require coding skills, Paperize is a great choice, although it is limited to a set of pre-designed templates. It's currently in beta, but they usually send out new invites quickly. If you want more control Squib is a ruby based package specifically tailored for designing cards, and has some very ...



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