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22

Yes, it is a split pot. Both players have AAKK8. You always make your best 5 card hand from the cards available. From Wikipedia: A hand always consists of five cards. In games where more than five cards are available to each player, the best five-card combination of those cards must be played. Any cards not included in the hand do not affect its ranking. ...


19

If a player cannot cover a blind, that player is all-in and the bets are handled just as if that player had gone all-in on an ordinary bet. The main pot gets an amount of money from each player who bets equal to the all-in player's stake. Any further betting goes into a side pot, which the all-in player is ineligible to win.


15

The bankroll is your safe haven. The bankroll is what makes you different from a gambler, betting, bet again, breaks and puts more money in the game. The bankroll is a fundamental part of you being a poker player. Treat it with due importance. The bankroll should be large. It's more than you think you need. It is much larger than you want it. The truth is ...


12

169 While Chris is technically correct, as far as strategy is concerned, there is no difference between having an Ace & King of spades vs. Ace & King of hearts. There is however a difference between having a suited Ace & King vs. a non-suited Ace & King. Looking at it that way, there are 169 possible starting hands.


12

Basically, as Wikipedia hints at, to make sure that a different player acts first before that flop than after the flop — just as in non-heads-up, where “Under The Gun” (the player after the Big Blind) acts first before the flop, and the Small Blind acts first after the flop. In heads up, if the non-dealer would post the Small Blind and the dealer the Big ...


10

In Hold'em, each player makes the best possible 5-card hand possible using any of the 7 cards available. To each player, there is no distinction between the communal cards and their own private cards. The selected 5-card poker hand can include 0, 1, or 2 of the hole cards. It's possible that the best hand you can make uses 0 of your hole cards. In this ...


10

In a tournament, "blinds" are set by formula, based on the number of rounds that have elapsed. So the big blind amount in this instance is 400. It's a LIVE blind, which means that the big blind can raise, but only after others have had a chance to do so. That's the disadvantage of being a big blind. Essentially, he raises the little blind from 200 to 400, ...


10

A rough rule (from economics) is that you should bluff until the money you lose from getting caught approximates the money that you would forego from not bluffing. That is, you should equate the "marginal utilities" of the two activities. If you "never" get caught, you aren't bluffing enough. That is, you are leaving money on the table with a number of ...


10

I would say that you want to make a continuation bet a large percentage of the time if you have signalled you are in the lead and no opponent has signalled otherwise. What this "large percentage" is probably depends on what you are comfortable with and how aggressive you are, but I would estimate it would vary from 50% to 100%. Continuation betting on ...


9

Implied odds or implied pot odds are calculated the same way as pot odds, but consider future betting. You figure implied odds in situations where you expect to fold in the next round if you don't make your draw. You lose no more bets if you miss, but can expect to gain extra bets if you hit the draw. An example. Say you see the flop with 2 other players ...


9

How you should be thinking about donk bets when deciding whether to use them: Donk bets don't have an inherently set purpose. You can do it as a bluff, you can donk bet for value, or you can do it to try to influence behavior (like a block bet). What you're trying to obtain by doing it depends on your hand and your expected response from your opponent. ...


5

It's when you 'check' (choose not to bet anything) after all players before you have checked. Often with a good hand you'll want to do this to give your opponent(s) an opportunity to improve and be willing to bet. With a weak hand you might want to do this if you suspect your opponent is slow-playing a good hand for the same reason.


5

One way to help this is to think about it backwards, so you have 8 periods of blinds (15 minutes x 4 x 2 hours) and let's assume 8 players, 100 chips each. So, ideally, you want one player eliminated each period. What's a high-enough blind to encourage play? Try 10-1 or 20-1. With 10-1, the last period will have 2 players, each with 400 chips, so that's ...


4

Pot Odds is a term that describes the ratio of the current bet to the pot. For example, consider if the pot is $100 and you need to make a $10 bet to stay in. Your hand is a dog, and you estimate only a 20% chance for you to win. Pot odds would say that you should make the bet as you are getting 10-1 on your $10. You can get more information from the ...


4

The general concept here is known as "pot odds". The basic goal is to figure out your probability of winning, and then compare the amount of money to "call" to the total amount of money you would win if you are successful. Neither of those are known values though, so you need to do your best to guess what they are. That requires both thinking about both ...


4

It's a hard question to answer, and depends on the player's style and whether the player likes to bluff, as well as the style and skill of the other players. If I don't have decent hole cards (low cards or nothing matching) I fold. I might risk it if I'm one of the blinds, but if I'm raised I'll fold. If I have a decent starting hand I usually wait for the ...


4

One of the most important things in bluffing is the image you have on the table. If you generally play tight, your opponents will trust your bets more and your bluffs will be more effective. Otherwise, if you are a loose player you could a lot more hands and your opponents will trust you less, and call your bets more often. So, if you are a tight player, ...


4

Found a web site that you can enter in the following parameters and it'll create a blind structure for you: Number of players: Tournament length (hours): Smallest chip denomination: Starting chips: Round length (minutes): http://pokersoup.com/tool/blindStructureCalculator


4

Here, the important factor is that Player B and Player C both lost to, and were "busted" by Player A's hand. Not that Player C's hand beats Player B's. If two players "bust out" on the same hand, then the prizes are awarded in DESCENDING chip order as of BEFORE the mutual bust. That is Player B comes in ahead of Player C. If Player C had sat out with 50 ...


4

You and your opponent both have "trip" queens. Then the side cards, or kickers, decide the issue. Your opponent has a side ace, and you have a side jack, both of which are higher than the nine on the board. So the ace plays. So does your jack, but aces "outkick" jacks. That is, you have QQQJ9, and your opponent has QQQA9 for a better hand. If your ...


3

In most tournaments, the big blind can go all-in blind as well. However, the actual raise does not happen until it is that player's turn. It does commit those chips to the pot, but other players can raise in front of him and do not have to consider his bet when making their raises. So any raise before the big blind would not have that all-in included in ...


3

The blind structure depends strongly on too many factors to have a standard structure. Most importantly it depends on the chip values you use. You can look at the offical WSOP structure on it's site: http://www.wsop.com/tournaments/ (The "Structure Sheet" links)


3

There is no official color scheme for chip values, and it varies from venue to venue and by country or governing body if any (Nevada does not regulate chip colors). New Jersey does have a Gaming Control board that does regulate the chip colors. (I couldn't find an official link). These colors match up with many of the standard colors you find in home sets. ...


3

I can think of two reasons why someone would decide to add more chips: He thinks he has the best hand at the table (he wants to win a large pot). He thinks he can convince others that he has the best hand at the table (he wants the stakes to be too high for others to continue).


3

While @wdypdx22's definition is correct, implied odds cannot be explained completely on a Q&A site. To fully understand the concept requires an immense amount of study and you will spend the rest of your life refining them. A better example of when they effect the outcome of the hand more is for hidden draws. For instance, if two to a suit come up on ...


3

The Independent Chip Model (ICM) is a way of calculating the right decision when playing the bubble in Texas Hold'em tournaments. Three players: A = Player 1's Stack B = Player 2's Stack C = Player 3's Stack T = Total chips in play A * .5 + B * (A * .3 + C * .2) / (A + C) + C * (A * .3 + B * .2) / (A + B)) / T


3

To expand on @lilserf's answer... An out is a mathematical probability that one player has to win the hand depending on the situation, and they are always used, not just mostly in all-in situations. You have to treat them as probabilities because there is always the chance for runner-runner cards which produce a winning hand. For instance, if you have ...


3

I try never to do this myself, and I push back extremely hard against people who do it to me. Most frequently, it seems to happen when my opponents have a hand slightly worse than top pair (or top pair with a weak kicker), or...more often are on a draw. So, instead of checking and letting me bet big, they make a smaller bet than I would have made, hoping I ...


3

It depends on how you define "starting hand." There are 52*51=2652 permutations of any two cards. There are (52*51)/2 combinations of two cards, if you treat (Card A, Card B) as being equal to (Card B, Card A), e.g. ace of spades, king of hearts as being equal to king of hearts, ace of spades). the total is 1326. There are 169 different hands consisting ...


3

I've encountered several systems of marked denominations on poker chips... The first is as follows, and is also what's listed at about.com: White, $1 Yellow, $2 Red, $5 Blue, $10 Grey, $20 Green, $25 Orange, $50 Black, $100 Pink, $250 Purple, $500 Burgundy, $1000 Light Blue, $2000 Brown, $5000 The second is: White $1 Red ...



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