Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

25

Seating is very important in Puerto Rico. The seat that wins the most is 1st Corn (based on World Boardgaming Championship stats). Here's one of the tourney pages with stats, if you look around you'll find more. Here's the compilation of stats from 2002 to 2009: Seat 1 indigo 41.53 scoring average, 19.9% of wins Seat 2 indigo 40.73 scoring average, 19.5% ...


24

According to the rules for the online version on BrettspielWelt, "no player may build a building more than once." And you can confirm this by looking at the official rules from Rio Grande, page 8: For all buildings: - Each player may build each building only once.


22

Captain: I would argue that this is actually the most complicated role in the game. If calculating its effects seems easy to you, then Captain might be getting chosen too often in your games. In the group that I play with, it is usually not cut and dry...ie...not all goods will be shipped. When that happens, so many things come into play: Which of my ...


18

Certainly -- the trick is do all the prep work after you finish a game. Once you are done with the game, sort everything out for the next game. These instructions all assume you will want to take into account the 2-Player variant when sorting; if you want to ignore the 2-player variant, ignore the bullets flagged with two stars (**). Personally, I play a ...


15

Game Play Differences While the games are thematically the same, and San Juan was designed as the "card game version" of Puerto Rico, the gameplay is actually quite different. Role Selection In Puerto Rico your choice of role has many implications. You need to consider how the role will affect your success, how it will affect the other players, and every ...


15

With most games of this type, the key to winning is balance. My Puerto Rico strategy is to think of the game in 3 equal strategic phases Phase 1 - get money Phase 2 - get money/VPs Phase 3 - get VPs You can make a corn only strategy work, but only if you are playing against below-par players. But to get money in phase 1, corn doesn't really help you. ...


15

The value of buildings comes from 2 sources Providing a direct VP contribution to your strategy Providing money to implement your strategy As you have correctly determined there are 2 archetypes of strategies: The Shippers The Builders Shipping Strategy Obviously they try to win by shipping more goods than the other players. They will choose ...


14

No, Using the Wharf is optional, and a player is not required to use it each turn. Here are a couple quotes from the rules. The Violet Buildings (page 9) A player is not required to use the special function of an occupied violet building if he does not want to (important with the wharf, see below). The Wharf (page 11 - emphasis, mine) The ...


14

I've read many people saying the same thing - the university is overpriced. I read one group who attempted to find the true value of the buildings by playing for two years and varying prices based on whether they were bought, and how well the people who bought them did. The write up contains a downloadable copy of their results and final prices for all ...


13

Board Game Bits has little wooden disks in various sizes. You could get some cheap plastic pirate coins you can get at pirate stores. This might help spice things up also. There is also a company out of Australia, Campaign Coins, that specializes in coinage useful for games and LARPs. They're prices are a little steep at $7 for ten coins, but they have a ...


13

Taken from the rules: Implementing the action of a character is voluntary (exception: Captain) Note: You can still choose Captain if you have no goods, the exception just means that if you pull Captain and have goods, you have to ship.


13

It means just a plantation, no colonists are required. From the rules: Residence The owner of the occupied residence earns, at game end, additional victory points for the plantations and quarries he has placed on his island. For up to nine filled island spaces, he earns 4 VP, for ten filled island spaces, he earns 5 VP, for eleven filled island ...


11

Short answer: I don't like the first expansion ("The Buildings" expansion in the Treasure Chest [BGG] set), as there are only a few good buildings; I do, however, enjoy the second expansion ("The Nobles" expansion in the aforementioned Treasure Chest). If you are a completist and want some variety, go for it, but I don't feel the first expansion adds much ...


11

Yes. Any role not chosen at the end of the round gets a coin placed on it. I can't find the official rules online, but I can point you to the Universal Head rules summary, which says, under "Reset the Roles": Place one doubloon on each of the three role cards not chosen this round and then return all role cards.


11

Here's how they did it at the 2010 World Boardgaming Championships and at EuroQuest: BIDDING FOR SEAT POSITION, STARTING WITH THE QUARTER-FINALS: Starting with the quarter-final round games and continuing in the semi-finals and Final game, we will use mandatory bidding for all four seats. It will work as follows: Each player will randomly draw a random ...


10

I think there's two types of answer to this depending on whether you mind longer putting-away times or not. If you're happy to put some extra effort into packing the pieces away, then a huge amount of time can be saved by storing the components in bags related to the number of players. For example a "3 player" victory point bag with 75 VPs in, a "4 player" ...


10

A corn-heavy strategy can be a good one, but corn-only is vastly inferior. In your example, you spent 12 coin on the office, large market and small market, and you will be trading for three coin each time. You could have bought a coffee roaster and tobacco storage for less (11 coin), and be selling those for four and three respectively. Even worse, if your ...


10

Puerto Rico is one of those games that if you play a 'sample' round or two, the game mechanics and the different role cards can be quickly learnt. It is also such a great game that first time board gamers get hooked on board games because of it. The mechanics of the game are actually pretty simple, but has a good depth of skill required to be a good player. ...


10

I do not agree with the other answers that say Craftsman should be rarely taken. By carefully consider seat order implications, if a player can answer the below questions in the affirmative then Craftsman should be the choice if no better options present themselves. First a review of what Craftsman does. Why take Craftsman? Craftsman generate barrels ...


10

The first random thing that happens in Puerto Rico is turn order. This can be offset by having players bid on seats. If you are playing with the expansion, then the buildings available are randomized. This can also help to prevent the game from being solvable. There are the plantation tiles as described int he question. Finally if you are playing with ...


9

Yes, From the rules, pg7 under "A new round ..." Now, the governor takes three doubloons from the bank, placing one each on the three role cards that were not selected during the round.


9

The rule what you stated, but your wording is awkward. I would say: If a player has a kind of goods that can be loaded on several empty ships, he must choose a ship at least as large as the number of goods of that kind, leaving no goods behind. If no ships are large enough, that player must choose the largest ship.


9

No, the players are not required to pick a plantation. From the rules, emphasis mine: The player who chooses this role may take either a quarry tile as his privilege or one of the face-up plantation tiles and place it on any empty island space on his player board. Afterwards, each other player, in clockwise order, may take one of the face-up plantation ...


8

Yep, there's no restriction about which ship you load the corn onto if all the ships are empty. It's often a good idea to load onto a ship that makes other players' loading decisions most inconvenient. The restriction does exactly what you assumed it does: stops you from loading a few of your goods into a small ship, if you could load all of them into a ...


8

It has two purposes: As you say, it ensures that every role gets taken, and that no role goes entirely unloved for too long. There are multiple paths to victory in Puerto Rico, and most of them require some combination of roles to be taken: a shipping strategy requires Settler/Mayor to set up and Craftsman/Captain to execute, a building strategy requires ...


7

Captain is often a tool used in the beginning to have someone have to ship their valuable resource, so that they can't trade it. It's why you don't want to just go and produce one valuable resource, because if you can't protect it with other goods, then it will become shipbound. Trader get's pulled sometimes because it has money on it and you want to ...


7

Keep in mind that shipping takes place in several turns, going around the table starting with the player that chose Captain. On your turn, you must load a good if you are able. This means that you could choose to load all your indigo on the empty ship (provided that the third ship is not already carrying indigo--there can be only one ship carrying each kind ...


6

Having just recently completed our first full game of Puerto Rico I have a fresh perspective on this. Previously we only played about an hour into the game. This time we had one new player and she came second place with 1 point behind and 10+ points ahead of the rest. All in all the individual parts of the game are not that difficult to learn. The manual is ...


6

RftG, in terms of gameplay, falls fairly in the middle of the two other games. Similar mechanics of role selection, cards as money, 'big building' cards, victory points, shipping strategy (consume) vs. building. There's slightly more relevance to role selection in RftG than in San Juan, but not as much as in Puerto Rico. Seating order doesn't matter as ...


6

I doubt there's a significantly different first round order. Certainly at the beginning there are very few options that are of use. We often see a prospector in fourth and fifth, the rational being: If the fourth player produces then the fifth player may take prospector (or trader in the unlikely event they managed to get a small market). A player on ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible