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First, there are games where rearranging/peeking at the top cards is an inherent mechanic, so obviously, don't split and draw in those games. Furthermore, splitting the deck before drawing might be perceived as a hint that card backs are marked, and that you actually know which card is coming, and you don't want it. For those reasons, and the superstition ...


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It's true that there's no statistical difference between a card taken from the top of a perfectly shuffled deck and a card taken from the middle of the deck. (Assuming that no one has already looked at the top cards.) The caveat is perfectly shuffled. Humans, in general, are rather bad at shuffling cards. For a standard 52 card deck, it takes about 7 riffle ...


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As long as you draw the whole deck before shuffling discards, it doesn't matter. Simply put, all cards in a well shuffled deck are equal. (Or have an equal probability of being this or that.) Splitting the deck, drawing in the wrong order, or intentionally drawing from the middle of the deck, or even shuffling the deck between draws does not matter, if ...


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Mathematically the probabilities are unaffected. Let's consider a simplified example with just 4 cards. Let's say we draw one card from the 4 aces from a standard deck of playing cards. The probability of drawing the Ace of Spades is 1/4. Now let's split the deck evenly and pick the first card from the first split to compare the probability of drawing the ...


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From the Ticket to Ride official rules: Draw Train Car Cards – The player may draw 2 Train Car cards. He may take any one of the face-up cards or he may draw the top card from the deck (this is a blind draw). If he draws a face up card, he immediately turns a replacement card face-up from the deck. He then draws his second card, either from the ...



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