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22

The third edition scoring is now what is shipped by both Rio Grande Games(US distributor) and Hans im Gl├╝ck(Original, German publishers) Rio Grande Games made the changes for the english version of the game (1st and 2nd edition scoring). Here are a summary of the scoring rule changes by edition 1st Edition Small City scoring (Completed 2 tile cities ...


20

First off, taken one way this might be an unanswerable question I'm struggling with the question. It seems to be asking folks to guess on what they think the rationale might have been for scoring 4-card runs as 4-points instead of 6 (or some other number); however, since the game was invented in the 17th century its inventor is long-since dead, and absent ...


11

There are three versions of the Carcassonne rules; citing Wikipedia: In the first and second editions of the game, completed cities covering just two tiles scored two points (one per tile) and one extra point for every pennant that resides in the city. This exception is removed from the third edition, in which there is no difference between two-tile ...


9

I understand how duplicate bridge works, but I'm still missing one small conceptual part of the scoring, being the outcome when a deal is passed out. Is the score for that hand just assumed to be 0 for both sides Yes. Why would there be an exception? Passing out the hand is a perfectly valid way to play it. making it identical to a hand that ...


9

The rule of honors applies to any side. So if you are defending hearts holding AKQJ of hearts, you get the requisite number of points. It really does not matter that there is a bonus for this. In the long run, the luck factor will even out. As to why this is there: Most of initial bridge (i.e. auction bridge) terms and rules (like rubber is two games etc) ...


6

Didn't figure to have to dig my copy of Shark out of the garage for this site! Here are the end of game rules. The game is over as soon as a company's share price indicator reaches 15,000 on the value scale, or all of the building in a particular colour have been used, or all of the shares have been sold The bonus that is due in the ...


5

When one side has won two games, all points (both above and below the line) are totaled, and the side with more points wins, even if they didn't win the rubber. This is where the bonus points come into play: the points for undertricks, overtricks, slams, rubber, etc. all count toward the final score. The American Contract Bridge League explains it the same ...


5

In tournaments, certainly, a passed hand is treated like any other; both pairs get a zero score. But in some (NB not all) of those clubs where the hands are dealt at the first table rather than set up by the TD, it is the convention to re-deal a hand that is passed out the first time, on the grounds that it's likely to be passed out every time, and so give ...


4

You get points "below the line" that count toward winning games. You get points "above the line" for HOW you win those games. You also get bonus points "above the line" for other things, that count toward your total score (as described below). The total of ALL the points (game and bonuses) determine the result. First, victory margin of 2-0 in games is most ...


4

Bananagrams has a pretty basic set of rules, compared to other games: it seems that the only guidance on this subject is "a legal word is one found in a dictionary (the volume should be agreed upon in advance)". Obviously all your examples can be found in many reasonably good dictionaries. However, I (and most other diehard Scrabble players I'm sure) would ...


4

I agree, it should have copied Red's guild card for you. I can't think of any reason it shouldn't. I've never used BSW, but I'm assuming it makes this choice automatically. It sounds like a bug to me. I hope their logic isn't looking at the value of the guild card, as scored by the owner, in order to determine which one is best for Olympia. As that would ...


4

The quality of a game is not determined by the height or depth of the total score. A great example is a soccer match where the total score is 25 goals. Obviously, one or both teams did not know how to play defense very well. Does 25 goals indicate that the game was good? Not necessarily. Let's examine a three games where we got a total score of 25. One ...


3

Boardgamegeek (http://boardgamegeek.com) has a play reporting feature which can include who played, what position each played, their score, and additional notes. Play notes can be publicly accessed. (It can be a bit of a pain, tho, to find someone else's plays.) It does exactly what you're asking for. If the same person reports every time, it's readily ...


3

Try this, it's a system called Whole-History Rating. From the abstract: Whole-History Rating (WHR) is a new method to estimate the time-varying strengths of players involved in paired comparisons. Like many variations of the Elo rating system, the whole-history approach is based on the dynamic Bradley-Terry model. But, instead of using ...


3

Very simply put, your reasoning is basically right, and you are not alone thinking like this. Does the rule still exist? American Contract Bridge League pages confirm my own personal experience that rubber bridge players often, I'd say always, choose to ignore the rule today (and why): As there is no skill in scoring for honors, players often agree ...


2

In reality a passed out deal on the first round should not be reshuffled and redealt. The reason it is done is that people pay table-money to play in a tournament and want to play the requisite number of boards with card-play as well as bidding. Therefore people feel "ripped off" if a board gets passed out. In a duplicate pairs contest, a board that is ...


2

We keep score during the game but almost always are off by a few points at the end. It's not always from forgetfulness - it's also possible to bump the score markers. Even when counting at the end it's easy to miss a route or count one twice. So at the end of game, here's what we do: We count one player at a time. For each player: One player will examine ...


2

I keep track on a piece of paper. Doing this lets you go back anytime during the game to see if a claim was not scored. At the end of the game, if the game scores are close, I'll go back through and double check or re-score the claims. Something like this: Plr1 Plr2 Plr3 2 2 4 4 4 4 4 6 1 5 1 7 ...


1

All of those suggestions you proffer for judging the quality of a game are excellent ones. Remarkably, an extremely accurate mechanism for weighting them all appropriately, so as to correctly assess the total quality of a game, has already been invented. Surprisingly, this mechanism ha been around since the game's inception, and is in fact a fundamental ...


1

If a hand is passed out, every team that passes it out gets a 0 raw score. These players will also get the same matchpoint score as other teams sitting in the same seats (East-West, or North-South) with a 0 score. There is the likelihood that SOME pair(s) will play out the deal. Then they will get a higher or lower matchpoint score than average, depending ...


1

I agree with the other answers, of course: but the most important part of "points above the line" is enabling a penalty points system for bidding games you can't hope to make. If only the points below the line counted, you could pre-emptively bid 7NT on any hand in which your opponents had the balance of the points. This would be tactically sound, but make ...


1

In games like bridge and mahjong, there are what I call "simple" wins (barely meeting the requirements) and "compound" wins (meeting the requirements with something extra to spare). The extra honors pretty much fall in the "compound" wins category, because cards in sequence are worth more than they are individually. That is, AKQJ is really worth MORE than ...


1

Via wikipedia: Any tile played from the player's rack onto a previously vacant square that is a "double-letter" or "triple-letter" premium square has its point value doubled or tripled as indicated. Add the normal point value of all other letters in the word (whether newly played or existing). For each newly played tile placed on a "double-word" premium ...



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