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9

Charles Matthews wrote an excellent book on this topic, coincidentally called Shape Up! It is available for free on the net, if you have a Gobase.org account simply grab it here, if not, Google should bring up something. To list a few of the ideas explained: Part 1 of the book, "Principles of development", covers basic terminology (table shape etc.), wedge ...


5

The terms thickness and influence are precisely defined and very easy to differentiate once you got the idea. Influence simply refers to a group facing the center of the board. If a group create influence and at the same time is already alive or can make eyes very easily is called thick. Note that a living group that is facing the edge of the board is not ...


4

Another good way to learn shape is to play shape game against a stronger player. Stronger player plays white you play black. To start with black places stones along the 1st lines, one space apart: $$Wc Shape game $$ +---------------------------------------+ $$ | . X . X . X . X . X . X . X . X . X . | $$ | X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X | $$ | . . . ...


3

I'm no expert (10k on a good day) but if you follow the general rule of playing away from thickness you should be off to a good start. If you fail to play far enough away you could easily get over connected which could lead to a heavy group.


2

I'd only offer a few more suggestions over those given so far. The delightful book by Kageyama, Lessons In The Fundamentals Of Go. Besides being an excellent all round resource and pleasingly written, it has a chapter, ch8, on some fundamentals of shape. It may be too basic for your skill level, but it is a must read for any Go player in my opinion. Heres a ...


1

Thickness is indeed about the same as strength and comes with "eye potential" and "connectivity". We only speak of thickness in the context of outward influence, while strong enclosed groups or groups with limited potential for expansion are rather called "solid". Most of the answers get this part right. But "heavy" is not at all the same as ...


1

Thickness and heavy stones are "similar," insofar as they involve a large number of stones. But there the similarity ends, because thick and heavy groups function differently. Thick stones are those that you want to drive your opponent toward, because they are secure, meaning that your opponent's relatively few stones will suffer in the presence of your ...



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