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27

Initially I forgot that Snapcaster Mage has Flash. Oops. Yes you can do this. The resolution goes like this. Fireball is cast, put on the stack. In response, you put Snapcaster Mage on the stack. (Which you can only do, of course, because it has Flash and can be cast as an instant.) You put nothing more on the stack, your opponent declines to put anything ...


13

I think it's instructive to go through both of your reasonings, since you're both partially right in a way but came to the wrong conclusion. the free spells get put on the stack before the original card resolves Your friend is actually right here. BUT — don't forget the rules of casting spells. In order to put a spell on the stack (even if free) he ...


13

Yes, Player B still takes damage from the Goblin Fireslinger. Rule 112 covers this adequately. Rule 112.3a tells us that Activating an ability puts it on the stack, until it resolves, is countered (Stifle), or it otherwise leaves the stack (Time Stop). Rule 112.7a tells us that the activated ability exists independent of the source, and does not quality this ...


11

The ability still resolves. Once the costs of the ability are paid and targets are chosen, the ability goes on the stack. Once the ability is on the stack, the source of the ability can be destroyed, returned to hand, shuffled into a library, or exiled --- none of this affects the ability which is already on the stack. Additionally, because of the rules of ...


11

The short answer: You resolve effects on the stack one at a time, and everyone gets a chance to put new stuff on the stack before you resolve the next effect. More detailed answer: The Magic comp rules use a system called "priority" to determine when you have a chance to play abilities and put stuff on the stack. Generally speaking, you can always respond ...


10

The destruction only happens once, it's instantaneous, and there's only one creature vulnerable to it when it happens. 610.1. A one-shot effect does something just once and doesn’t have a duration. Examples include dealing damage, destroying a permanent, putting a token onto the battlefield, and moving an object from one zone to another. Think of it a ...


6

Given the situation you described (2 Slaughter Pacts and 15 lands in hand, and a Lightning Storm on the stack), you can definitely win. I assume that you started by targeting your opponent with Lightning Storm. Then you still have priority, so you cast Slaughter Pact targeting the Spellskite. You also discard 7 lands to Lightning Storm's ability (failing to ...


5

It depends on what spell you are trying to use to get things out of the graveyard. You follow the instructions on Epic Experiment in order, so if you reveal a spell like Unburial Rites that targets a creature card in the graveyard, you won't be able to use it on a card revealed by the experiment. That creature is still in exile! However if you use a card ...


5

When Wizards rejigged the way the stack worked (for 6th edition? a long time ago, anyway), one of the fun examples I recall was: Player 1 puts Armageddon on the stack. In response to Armageddon, Player 2 sacrifices all his lands to Zuran Orb. This resolves. Armageddon is once again at the top of the stack. In response to Armageddon, Player 1 now ...


4

Your Vastwood Hydra comes first if your opponent waits for the ability to resolve. You distribute the counters upon resolution of the ability. This means that your opponent must choose to Shock your followers, before the Hydra ability resolves. The Hydra's ability doesn't use the word "Target", so you need not declare which creatures get the counters until ...


4

Neither. A spell is cast after its costs are payed, before anyone has a chance to respond to it, before it resolves. From the rules: 601.2. To cast a spell is to take it from where it is (usually the hand), put it on the stack, and pay its costs, so that it will eventually resolve and have its effect. So yes, if you cast Silence, it will be too late ...


4

Yes, you can do that. Each creature you control that deals damage to a player triggers the ability and puts another copy on the stack. Then after each triggered ability resolves, each player gets priority, so you can again tap your enchanted creature to put another token into play. Note that you must choose the targets for each instance of the triggered ...


4

Taken from this page: 700.4. If a permanent is indestructible, rules and effects can’t destroy it. (See rule 701.6, “Destroy.”) Such permanents are not destroyed by lethal damage, and they ignore the lethal-damage state-based action (see rule 704.5g). Rules or effects may cause an indestructible permanent to be sacrificed, put into a graveyard, or ...



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