Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

33

Initially I forgot that Snapcaster Mage has Flash. Oops. Yes you can do this. The resolution goes like this. Fireball is cast, put on the stack. In response, you put Snapcaster Mage on the stack. (Which you can only do, of course, because it has Flash and can be cast as an instant.) You put nothing more on the stack, your opponent declines to put anything ...


14

The short answer: You resolve effects on the stack one at a time, and everyone gets a chance to put new stuff on the stack before you resolve the next effect. More detailed answer: The Magic comp rules use a system called "priority" to determine when you have a chance to play abilities and put stuff on the stack. Generally speaking, you can always respond ...


14

Yes, Player B still takes damage from the Goblin Fireslinger. Rule 112 covers this adequately. Rule 112.3a tells us that Activating an ability puts it on the stack, until it resolves, is countered (Stifle), or it otherwise leaves the stack (Time Stop). Rule 112.7a tells us that the activated ability exists independent of the source, and does not quality this ...


14

I think it's instructive to go through both of your reasonings, since you're both partially right in a way but came to the wrong conclusion. the free spells get put on the stack before the original card resolves Your friend is actually right here. BUT — don't forget the rules of casting spells. In order to put a spell on the stack (even if free) he ...


12

Would the stack resolve their ability first? Yes. A spell cast in response to another resolves first (Last In, First Out). 116.4. If all players pass in succession (that is, if all players pass without taking any actions in between passing), the spell or ability on top of the stack resolves or, if the stack is empty, the phase or step ends. ...


11

The destruction only happens once, it's instantaneous, and there's only one creature vulnerable to it when it happens. 610.1. A one-shot effect does something just once and doesn’t have a duration. Examples include dealing damage, destroying a permanent, putting a token onto the battlefield, and moving an object from one zone to another. Think of it a ...


11

The ability still resolves. Once the costs of the ability are paid and targets are chosen, the ability goes on the stack. Once the ability is on the stack, the source of the ability can be destroyed, returned to hand, shuffled into a library, or exiled --- none of this affects the ability which is already on the stack. Additionally, because of the rules of ...


10

Your opponent gets to put their silver on the stack first. However, you can then add your incinerate to the stack, targetting their Root Silver. Incinerate New Sliver You can then pass so the Incinerate resolves, destroying the Root Sliver. Stack is now: New Sliver Then you cast your counterspell so the stack is Counterspell New Sliver Your ...


7

When Wizards rejigged the way the stack worked (for 6th edition? a long time ago, anyway), one of the fun examples I recall was: Player 1 puts Armageddon on the stack. In response to Armageddon, Player 2 sacrifices all his lands to Zuran Orb. This resolves. Armageddon is once again at the top of the stack. In response to Armageddon, Player 1 now ...


6

Given the situation you described (2 Slaughter Pacts and 15 lands in hand, and a Lightning Storm on the stack), you can definitely win. I assume that you started by targeting your opponent with Lightning Storm. Then you still have priority, so you cast Slaughter Pact targeting the Spellskite. You also discard 7 lands to Lightning Storm's ability (failing to ...


6

If it's dead, it's not coming back. Reminder text isn't actually official rules, but it is there to help you out, and there's a key phrase in the reminder text to help you in this case just from the card, without having to look things up: You may cast this spell for its dash cost. If you do, it gains haste, and it's returned from the battlefield to its ...


6

No, Dragon Tempest's ability does not see the devoured Dragons when the Dragon token enters the battlefield. As you can see in the reminder text on Dragon Broodmother, the Devour ability says As the token enters the battlefield, you may sacrifice any number of creatures. It enters the battlefield with twice that many +1/+1 counters on it. This means ...


6

Your reasoning is only partly correct: you can't use that extra token to help pay for the spell, because it won't exist yet. You have to sacrifice two creatures that you already have at casting time. If you want extra creatures and tokens to sacrifice, they have to be there first. That's because of the spell casting process. During that process, nothing ...


5

Twincast copies Lightning Bolt, dealing 3 damage to whatever target you choose, then the original Lightning Bolt resolves as usual - a total of 6 damage. The first sentence of your question pretty much explains why. To be specific (and correct the detail about priority): You cast Lightning Bolt, putting it onto the stack. You gain priority before your ...


5

It depends on what spell you are trying to use to get things out of the graveyard. You follow the instructions on Epic Experiment in order, so if you reveal a spell like Unburial Rites that targets a creature card in the graveyard, you won't be able to use it on a card revealed by the experiment. That creature is still in exile! However if you use a card ...


5

Neither. A spell is cast after its costs are payed, before anyone has a chance to respond to it, before it resolves. From the rules: 601.2. To cast a spell is to take it from where it is (usually the hand), put it on the stack, and pay its costs, so that it will eventually resolve and have its effect. So yes, if you cast Silence, it will be too late ...


5

Yes, if you exchange control of Daring Thief with another creature while a spell targeting Daring Thief is on the stack, the spell will still be targeting the Daring Thief when the exchange completes. The Thief is still the same object when the exchange happens, it just has a different controller.


5

Taken from this page: 700.4. If a permanent is indestructible, rules and effects can’t destroy it. (See rule 701.6, “Destroy.”) Such permanents are not destroyed by lethal damage, and they ignore the lethal-damage state-based action (see rule 704.5g). Rules or effects may cause an indestructible permanent to be sacrificed, put into a graveyard, or ...


4

Yes. You might be thinking of the following rule: 400.7. An object that moves from one zone to another becomes a new object with no memory of, or relation to, its previous existence. There are seven exceptions to this rule: There is only one battlefield, not one per player. 400.1. A zone is a place where objects can be during a game. There are ...


4

Your Vastwood Hydra comes first if your opponent waits for the ability to resolve. You distribute the counters upon resolution of the ability. This means that your opponent must choose to Shock your followers, before the Hydra ability resolves. The Hydra's ability doesn't use the word "Target", so you need not declare which creatures get the counters until ...


4

Yes, you can do that. Each creature you control that deals damage to a player triggers the ability and puts another copy on the stack. Then after each triggered ability resolves, each player gets priority, so you can again tap your enchanted creature to put another token into play. Note that you must choose the targets for each instance of the triggered ...


4

If you want to activate Lions Eye Diamond before drawing a card, you must do so before Gitaxian Probe resolves. You can respond to another event, like your opponent playing a spell or activating an ability. So no, there is no opportunity to respond to your spell once it has begun resolving. You will get priority after the spell resolves, and at that time ...


2

Yes, it is possible to respond to one trigger after others have finished resolving. After Splinterfright's ability resolves, the active player (you) gets priority to play spells/abilities. See rule 116.3b: The active player receives priority after a spell or ability (other than a mana ability) resolves. At this point, you have an opportunity to cast ...


2

To achieve what you're wanting, you'll have to do as follows: 1) Cast Gitaxian Probe 2) Before passing priority to your opponent, activate Lion's Eye Diamond 3) Once you discard your hand and get your mana, Gitaxian Probe will remain on the stack (and can resolve as normal). The important thing is to remember to immediately activate Lion's Eye as soon ...


2

Not as you have written, while Gitaxian Probe is resolving no one can do anything since no one has priority. However you could cast Gitaxian Probe, hold priority, and then activate Lion's Eye Diamond, thus you will get to draw after discarding your hand because Gitaxian Probe has not resolved yet (as you did not pass priority). This won't allow you to look ...


2

The short answer to your question is yes, your opponent can destroy your creature, no you can't change targets and you have to pay the mana cost. Longer answer. So to cast you spell, you have to pay it's mana cost. Once it is paid there are no refunds. You also declare targets at this point. At this point the stack looks like this: (top) Indestructable ...


2

As you guessed, this little trick doesn't work. There are only two ways to activate an ability or cast a spell while another spell or ability is resolving, and your combo doesn't fall into either one: If the spell/ability that's resolving lets a player pay mana, that player can activate mana abilities. If the spell/ability currently resolving explicitly ...


1

Yes. The Upkeep step goes like this: 503.1. First, any abilities that trigger at the beginning of the upkeep step and any abilities that triggered during the turn's untap step go on the stack. (See rule 603, "Handling Triggered Abilities.") 503.2. Second, the active player gets priority. Players may cast spells and activate abilities. So at the ...


1

No, the stack doesn't have to be empty but you need to have priority. In this case you can cast another spell after the Snapcaster mage but your opponent can play a spell or ability first. Here's how it goes: Player 2 casts Fireball. Player 1 receives priority. He casts Snapcaster mage. Player 2 receives priority. He can't counter Snapcaster so he takes ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible