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21

I use small plastic baggies for almost every game I buy. When I open a game, I expect to need a few snack sized, sandwich sized, and tiny hobby-sized baggies. These satisfy my needs for most games. The exception is BattleLore for which I purchased a couple of small-parts boxes (intended for crafting, I think) from my local Hobby Lobby. They have worked out ...


15

A great solution to this struck me as I was falling asleep a few nights ago (strange how the brain works): I won't need the expansion boxes anymore, so I could cannibalize those into smaller boxes. After a lot of careful measuring, I took the expansion box lids and scored them across the top in three places with a pair of scissors and a ruler, creating ...


14

The usual recommendation is to get a sheet of plexiglass (known as Perspex® in the UK) and lay that across the board when you're playing. It's an especially good solution for "board" games that don't actually have a board. Well-made board-backed games don't really need any help, but many small-press games have the board printed on stiff card or even ...


13

I found this on a BoardGameGeek thread: You can try this...clear wallpaper, avaliable at any home improvement store and even Walmart, if you're lucky enough to find it there; about $10 a roll and the roll will do the tiles and more. The clear wallpaper will have to be cut after application (it's self adhesive), will have to be trimmed with an craft ...


11

I've also been trying to fit more board games in less space recently. Some notes so far: The modern medium-square-box style of game works fine on the side in a bookcase; e.g. pretty much anything by Fantasy Flight or Days of Wonder. Catan and similar smaller boxes will work OK even on their end. Old-style flat/thin boxes (Monopoly etc.) really don't ...


11

You probably need to contact a boardgame manufacturer, or prototyping service. Would probably run you about $2 a box. Board Game Design Print and Play productions Speilmaterial.de


9

A zip-lock bag can work amazingly well for most situations.


8

I'm not sure if this would work well for you, as you didn't mentioned exactly what type of things you're transporting, but I'll throw it out there as a posibility for when you need to transport larger items (eg, I have a wh40k scale titan that I built for a friend when the Armageddon rules came out) find a container of a suitable size for transporting the ...


7

There are products like SprayFix, which cover paper with a protective varnish. It prevents dirt from attaching to paper surfaces. This is used often with games using counters, to protect them from wearing. I think you can apply it to board surfaces perfectly.


7

When we moved into our house, there was a hand-made storage unit in the basement that I ended up commandeering for all my board games because of its near-perfect size. The interior storage area of each shelf is 9 1/2" tall, 14" deep, and 48" wide. If you make the interior dimensions a little deeper and wider, you should be able to affix doors to the ...


7

In general I try to do as little box customizing as possible, but here's some tips I've developed for storage: Check out the fishing section of your local department store. Not for whole tackle boxes, though. You want the little plastic divided trays. There's a lot of different sizes available and most brands even have repositionable dividers for further ...


6

Storing on side? Being an old-school wargamer, three things come immediately to mind: Counter Trays Ziplock Baggies Box Bands There used to be plastic vacuformed couter trays (with lids) available; probably still are. Other equivalents are small plano boxes, and sewing organizers, many of which will work, as well, for keeping bits organized. Ziplocks, ...


6

Check with Board Game Geek. On pages for games, they have a list of all versions with the size and weight. For example, see this entry for Race for the Galaxy. It states that pretty much all versions are 10.83 x 7.48 x 2.56 inches and 1.44 lbs. Other games should also have version sections with similar information.


6

Hair Bands Similar to using rubber bands, but they don't deteriorate and stick to the cards over time. If possible get metal free ones, rather than the type on the right - less likely to catch on the cards. Small Cardboard Boxes Have a look around your house, you'll probably find something that's the right size. Plasters often come in boxes that are a ...


5

Following the answer provided by Egg of P'an Ku, try clear contact paper.


5

For the tiles it's quite easy to write the expansion (or print it out on a sticker for a nicer look) on the bottom.


5

Rubber bands - Extremely cheap solution. Allows you to group cards of a similar type together. Over a long period of time though, the rubber will crack and may even stick to your cards. If you sleeve your cards this is of minor concern. Plastic Sandwich bags - If you submit your games to high humidity, these do not "breath" and may cause moisture damage. ...


4

As the question notes, Poker Chips in place of money is quite viable. I don't remove the money, just leave it bagged in the box. Gaming stones or poker chips can be used to track victory points as well. On some sports games, counters or standups are replaced with meeples or minis readily. I've found that meeples fit beautifully on the Crash Tackle board, ...


4

Probably, the best way to store a cube is in a properly sized corrugated trading card box. These boxes are fairly cheap, and with your local friendly game store's 100% markup, they shouldn't run you more than a couple dollars. I wouldn't use booster pack boxes or shoe boxes. Booster boxes are too flimsy, because the are designed for display purposes. You ...


3

If you are worried about the bits and pieces floating around inside the box, definitely go with plastic bags or a small craft organizer. Box inserts are designed for flat storage, and components can often float around insider the box if it is tipped. Some games have more of a gap between the roof of the box and the top of the divider than others (see Castle ...


3

It seems to me if your games are getting crushed or it's taking so long to get at the bottom ones, your stacks are too high. I suggest dividing your shelving so that you have only about five games high, which keeps the weight down and makes removal, even via sliding, easy. In college, I used milk crates for this purpose, stacked 8x6 so nearly 50 different ...


3

I have a solution that has worked out great for us. We colored coded the items from each set using colored markers on the thin white side edge of each of the hexes, board pieces, etc based on the set with which it had arrived. We used light pastel markers, the effect is not noticable during standard game play but makes it incredibly easy to group cards at ...


3

Plastic Battery Cases For games with lots of little cardboard counters, like Arkham Horror, I bought a bunch of AAA- and AA-battery cases from e-bay. They ship world-wide for about 1-2 USD, and can easily store a lot of counters. My favorite thing about them is that they also act as trays, so players can take their components for themselves. This helped a ...


3

It depends on the game. For some games, I use boxes with small spaces to store the contents. For other games, I made some paper internal to divide the open box into several compartments.


3

If you're still interested in vacuum-forming, Make magazine (by O'Riley Press) had an article on how to make your own vacuum-former in issue 11. I followed their instructions and made one so I could quickly duplicate parts for a board game prototype I'm making. An important note: You'll want to find a (local) source for sheets of .03" or .02" Styrene if ...


3

There are a couple of companies I can think of off the top of my head, Sabol Designs and Battle Foam who have foam trays where you can pluck out squares to fit the shape of models you need. Depending on how small the game pieces are, though, the squares may still be too big for you, and they're not exactly cheap either. If you want to make your own, I ...


3

Rubber bands, bags and boxes. I put all the tiles from the base game, minus the starting tile, in the cloth bag from Traders & Builders, and the tiles from each major expansion (T & B; Inns & Cathedrals; Bridges, Castles & Bazaars) in piles wrapped with a rubber band each. All my followers, builders and the like are in one ziplock bag, all my bridges in ...


3

The cardboard boxes that come with "fat packs" are sturdy, reasonably portable, and visually appealing. I don't think one can hold 750 sleeved cards, but two should be sufficient. Third-party online shops often resell just the boxes individually for a few dollars. Players are going to need to sleeve up their basic lands anyway, so I see no reason not to put ...


2

I built two custom boxes for Carcassonne tiles using some check boxes from the bank and some spare cardboard. I glued dividers into the boxes and labeled each section with the expansion title and number of tiles. It's a little bit of work, but you get custom boxes that are sized perfectly for the tiles you have. I then put the meeples and scoring tiles ...


2

I would just write down how much of what you need in each box and use that as a check list. If you remember what the pieces are called, a list is easier to make and doesn't require printing. Separating how many times of each tile goes in the Seafarers box and the base game box is a hassle. I've already put a list of components in my 5-6 player boxes for ...



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