Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

Ante and blinds are both forced bets. Ante is a bet that everyone in the game must make in order to stay at the table. It forces there to always be at least some payout in the pot, increasing the relative value of playing a hand to folding. Blinds are bets that only one or two players are forced to make, usually a small blind and a big blind, the small ...


13

To give a short, simple attempt at answer to kick things off: I would say that a roleplaying game must be partly comprised of hidden information that has been invented by one or more of the players. That's the key difference I can see between The Arkham Horror/Mansions of Madness (boardgames) and The Call of Cthulhu (roleplaying game), where both are ...


12

Most of the special terminology of Go is just Japanese Go terms adopted by English-speaking players. Depending on who you're dealing with, you can be just as likely to see references to "shimari" and "fuseki" as you are to see "corner enclosures" and "the opening". A good beginner's resource for learning Go can be found at Sensei's Library. In particular, ...


10

At a high level, an "Indian" in Chess is just advancing the pawn which is in front of a knight by one square. King or Queen indicates which side the advanced pawn is on. This move will usually be followed by the fianchetto of the bishop nearest the pawn. This puts the bishop in front of the knight and allows him to control one of the long diagonals on ...


9

BGG has this definition in their glossary: A game with simple rules that is easy to teach to non-gamers in order to attract new players into boardgaming as a hobby. Usually people will say that a Gateway Game must have at least these qualities: Simple (so you can explain the rules to them quickly). Fun (fun games will attract repeat plays). Short ...


9

Now that the black mistake in the original sequence has been explained by Laval, maybe it's interesting to give an analyse of the original position. It's not very easy to tell who will be able to play first at a. $$ Initial position $$ -....... $$ -....... $$ -...OOOO $$ -.....XO $$ -.OOOOOX $$ -XOXXO.X $$ -aX..XX. $$ -....... $$ -------- If the ...


9

The canonical name for these seems to be 'Mana Rocks', probably so named after one of the very first, Fellwar Stone.


8

In an archetypical board game, the action focuses almost exclusively on that which can be represented by state on the board, state on a sub-board, or marker substitutions. Further, board games generally operate on the principle of "What is not explicitly permitted is forbidden." The board itself versus the Narrative In a Roleplaying game, the board is not ...


8

A cantrip is any spell that allows you to draw a card in addition to it's regular effect (e.g. Peek). It is typically of low casting cost, and the drawing is a secondary effect.


8

In later revisons of Power Grid phases are used to describe the difference phases of a turn. Steps are used to describe the 3 different game states that happens when a player builds 7 cities or pull the card in OP post from the top of the power plant pile. The card does say "Step 3" in the later revisions that I played. For more information check the Power ...


7

A little googling brought up this definition, paraphrased: A gateway game is a game that you can use to introduce non-gamers to the world of 'real', i.e. complex games. A gateway game has good replay value has nice game components is good for mixed age groups


5

I believe that Living Card Games is a term used (and owned) by Fantasy Flight Games. You can read about them on their website. The basic theory is that they release a core set and potentially endless expansion packs. However unlike Magic: The Gathering and other collectible card games, each set (core or otherwise) comes complete in each pack. This should ...


4

According to Wikipedia: Puppet Stayman, initially developed by Neil Silverman and refined by Kit Woolsey and Steve Robinson in 1977-78 If you can locate copies of the April 1977 and April 1978 editions of The Bridge World magazine that might have more details on the history of the system. As to why it's called puppet stayman, this page has an answer ...


4

How is a board game not a role-playing game? Let's say you have a board game game with these elements: an Overlord (GM) that commands the Monsters and sends Heroes on Quests.. multiple players that take on the roles of characters in the game (PC) Timmy always screaming, "Death to the Orcs" whenever he rolls for an attack. Board games can be role playing ...


4

It's a joke, referencing the fact that many games these days have means of determining a starting player that are somewhat arbitrarily related to the theme of the game but where there's nothing stopping you from choosing the starting player however you like. For example, the player with the pointiest ears is meant to be the start player for Small World, ...


4

Roughly, to most people, a "strong" deck is one that'll tend to win against other decks in its format, and a "weak" deck is one that'll tend to lose. It's about winning and losing, though, not as much how you win. Note that "in its format" is a pretty big deal - strong Standard decks are completely different from strong Vintage decks. Why isn't speed of ...


3

This sounds a lot like a strategy-stealing argument. It's often used to prove that one side of a game has an advantage, even if optimal strategy is not known. As a broad example, consider a game with the following properties: It is a turn-based game The starting positions are identical except Player A goes first Player A has the option of skipping the ...


3

(Part of) the rules of Set read as follows: The dealer shuffles the cards and lays twelve cards (in a rectangle) face up on the table so that they can be seen by all players. The players remove a 'Set' of three cards as they are seen. Each 'Set' is checked by the other players. If correct, the 'Set' is kept by the player and the dealer replaces ...


3

Ante is given by all players before cards are dealt. It's effect is to make sure that everyone has some skin in the game, and that people don't instantly fold when dealt less than stellar cards. Blinds are a different way of dividing up the ante so that only a few player are committed to the game before seeing their cards. They are generally split into big ...


3

The King's Indian is a hypermodern opening, where Black deliberately allows White control of the centre with his pawns, with the view to subsequently challenging it with the moves ...e5 or ...c5. The Queen's Indian Defense, also a hypermodern opening, is defined by the moves 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 The move 3...b6 increases Black's control over the ...


3

Pasting in the native speaker sources from the Sensei's answer (put there by Bill Spight I think): 辛い(からい)厚みよりも地をとることを意図すること。 from Weblio's Basic Go Dictionary 厚みより地をとることを目的とすること。 from a different go dictionary 厚みよりも実利(地)を重視していること。 From the katteyomi go dictionary Also, if you google for "地に辛い" (ji ni karai, i.e. concentrating on taking territory) you ...


3

Just say the turns have a 'rotating starting player'. If you have players familiar with poker or card games in general, you can use the dealer & blinds as an example.


3

What constitutes a strong or weak deck depends on a few different things, the biggest are the format (Standard, Modern, etc.) and somewhat related to that the metagame. What ends up defining a strong deck is one that has a good chance of winning most of its matches, and a weak one is one that doesn't have a good chance of winning. The biggest thing that ...


2

The term Gateway game comes from Gateway drug. A gateway game is like a gateway drug. It's what you give to somebody in hopes of them enjoying it and trying harder more intense variations. For instance, I want to get my non nerdy friends to play Pandemic with me (a cooperative game) but it looks too fiddly for them and the theme has too much science for ...


2

Strange, as the Japanese word "karai" means hot or spicy, or salty. It can also mean strict, harsh, tough. It does not sound, to me, like a word that would be used to describe a nice, solid defensive move. [EDIT: but it seems it is, see the comments] I'm wondering if the original person mis-heard or mis-typed the word "katai". That means solid. As a ...


2

(This is a preliminary answer, I'm hoping for someone to come up with a more founded answer with example situations). To my knowledge, karai means "clear and sharp" and is typically applied to important, big moves that globally put pressure on the opponent to come up with a (global) strategy. This is different from kiai which is a little closer to (local) ...


2

"Mana Rocks" might be a genuine term, but I don't think it's a particularly useful one, as it's not very descriptive of the use of these cards. If I was talking about this class of card, in a way more likely to explain why I'd want to include some in my decks, I'd just go for "artifact-based mana acceleration". I know this answers your question less well ...


2

Definitions are only useful as long as they are useful. It is much more important that a game category reasonably describes aspects of the game that the person you are communicating with can understand, than that it can be summarized using a few technical bullets. Thus, when normal usage of a term conflicts with some suggested definition, then the definition ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible