Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

No. You should almost never let the first mission succeed as a spy. So what if your opponents know that one of the participants is a spy? They don't know which one, and they won't be able to win without figuring out which of you it is. By making the first mission fail, you give your opponents fewer opportunities to make mistakes as the game progresses. ...


10

The rules say to do it without randomizing. This is from official rules (you can find the PDF file here, emphasis is mine): Mission Team Vote: After appropriate discussion, the Leader calls for a vote on the Team assignments. Each player, including the Leader, secretly selects one Vote Token. When all players have their selected Vote Token ready, ...


8

This solution would work, though it may take a minute to perform. For p players, with t traitors and n "normals", you need: t "You are a traitor" cards and n "You are a normal" cards, obviously p "player" cards marked with unique colours (or numbers or whatever) 1 card with an identical back to the player cards and a blank face (a kind of joker) Deal ...


8

I've never seen a single player (spy or not) being able to avoid cheering, asking "why you did that" or commenting a recently won/lost The Resistance match. This is an important moment of relief, discussion, curiosity satisfaction and laughter. It's like sharing an adventurous or humorous story with those at the table, maybe strengthening or creating ...


7

All games require people to be at least somewhat invested in playing properly, otherwise what's the point in playing in the first place? I think the issue is made clear in your line about how there "was a social dynamic of people not wanting to argue, and 'let's just get on with the game'" - sorry, but arguing in The Resistance IS the game. Without the ...


7

There are several new mechanics brought in the game with Avalon. The major ones play around two new characters Merlin and The Assassin. Merlin allows the good side to have some knowledge of who is good/evil but on the flip side The Assassin allows for the evil side to turn a loss into a victory by figuring out who is Merlin. In addition to those two there ...


6

You've got a secret channel (the role cards) and the ability to broadcast a shared secret, so any implementation that uses those two features can be made to work. There are an unlimited number of such implementations. Each one varies in the security of the code, and the difficulty or tediousness of the discovery process. The eyes open/shut approach is ...


6

The player using In the Spotlight must announce their intent to use it immediately after a successful Mission Team Vote, and they must select the target player before any team member selects their Mission card. After the target has been chosen, each team member selects a Mission card and puts it on the table in front of them. The player who is the target of ...


5

Here's a mathematical analysis of a potential winning strategy for the Resistance side: http://amininima.wordpress.com/2013/05/18/the-resistance/ And there's a thread on Boardgamegeek where they're trying to determine a formula for "spy-ness": http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/759016/using-excel-to-find-spies Hope this answers your question!


4

If you're a Resistance member and the first leader, this tactic gives a 1-in-5 chance of directly winning the game: On the first round, send yourself and someone who isn't to your left. If both the player you send and the player to your left are Resistance members, you win! The flow is as follows: You and the selected Resistance member succeed at the ...


4

I have really been enjoying this game; we play it a lot at work over lunch. I haven't kept track, but I'm pretty sure the victories are roughly evenly split. You are correct that in a game with fewer than 8 players, the first mission almost always goes to the Resistance because the Spies aren't willing to risk being found out. This isn't an issue with 8+ ...


4

In The Resistance, the biggest danger is having a consistent strategy that is predictable. As a spy, I usually don't fail the first mission if there's only one other person on it, but sometimes I will. If there are 2 other players on it I'm much more likely to sabotage, but still not every time. Being on a successful mission almost guarantees that I'll be ...


3

I believe the leader not only looks at the plot cards, he also chooses what card to give which player. I couldn't find a copy of the original rules online, but here is a summary of the rules. Also note the plot cards are public information once dealt to a player.


3

I know you don't want a computer-based solution, but a simple mobile app can solve this nicely. Tell it how many players you have, then pass it around the table. There's a single button you tap to view your role. If you're a bad guy, it also shows you where in the seating order your comrades are. Before you pass it to the next player, tap a button that ...


3

Scenario 1: It is round 2 of a 6-player game, so 3 players are needed for the mission. Alice (loyal) is the leader and strongly (but silently) suspects Bob of being a traitor, perhaps due to a "tell". Carol also suspects Bob and is strongly saying so, and Bob is playing offended. Alice nominates all three of herself, Bob, and Carol for the mission. She ...


3

When the leader chooses a team, the mechanics say it's time to vote. If people aren't respecting that and keep arguing anyway, the leader should overrule them and force the issue. Note that if the leader tries to rush through a vote "too quickly", the team is likely to be rejected and the leader likely to fall under suspicion, so this is self-policing.


2

I found the publisher's page.. The link to the rules is a tiny button right under the red navigation menu on the left hand of the screen.


2

I thought I'd add a scenario I thought of. Alice is the leader. Bob is accusing Charlie of being a spy. Alice suspects that Charlie isn't a spy, but Bob is, and is trying to sow seeds of discord. Alice, without making a deal of it (pretends to ignore/not notice Bob's arguements) assigns Alice, Bob and Charlie to the team. If Bob really was Resistance, ...


2

This problem doesn't seem specific to the game at hand, though of course, you'll probably find it easier to convince people you know to play a game seriously, or choose a game that they will enjoy and/or make the game enjoyable for others. There are a number of reasons why people don't play games just to win: http://onigame.livejournal.com/34424.html


2

I definitely recommend revealing who the spies were at the end. Not revealing them would just lead to additional frustration, and among friends it could cause unnecessary tension. You could potentially wait until after a string of 3 or 4 games are completed before revealing who the spies were in each round, but at that point you may not remember with ...


1

The problem with The Resistance is it really requires the right group of people to play with, and the right mindset. It is so small it could be considered a casual game, but it's complex enough it can be considered more advanced (not for beginner-boardgamers). I personally find no interest in it - and I love most board games - light or heavy. I also run ...


1

At the start of the game, the resistance has the advantage of numbers and the spies have the advantage of knowledge. The core tactic of the resistance is to reduce the spies' advantage by making as much knowledge public as is possible. One of the biggest pieces of public knowledge is what teams are proposed, and how people vote for them. As such, in the ...


1

Sometimes it works as an information-gathering gambit. You nominate a team, then vote it down hoping it fails, but taking note of who voted for it. What to make of those votes of course depends a lot on playstyle and whether the vote passed or not. If you are under heavy suspicion, you might either pull the above gambit or pretend to just so you don't take ...


1

I own both, and we play The Resistance: Avalon a lot more than we play The Resistance now. There are so many more points of intrigue and styles of play with Merlin and the Assassin. Merlin knows a LOT of information, but Merlin also has to be careful about how much information is revealed. Otherwise the Assassin will just take out Merlin at the end and ...


1

Though I have not played it yet, I have been told it has a new mechanic. Merlin is introduced and works in this way: He knows who the minions are and can introduce this knowledge into the game. It is important that he is subtle because if the minions can discover who he is they can win. Here is a really great review.


1

Rules found on the Coup kickstarter page which included these promos: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2012515236/coup-bluff-and-deception-in-the-world-of-the-resis/posts/694256



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible