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11641
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location New York, New York
age 56
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 5 hours ago

I play a number of board and card games with varying degrees of skill, but using "algorithms" to avoid the most obvious mistakes. Depending on the game, if you can beat me, you are probably not a beginner, and perhaps a pretty good player.


Mar
29
asked When might a Standard American bidder “bend” the five card major rule?
Mar
28
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
24
revised Game Balance Axis and Allies WWI
added 96 characters in body
Mar
24
answered Game Balance Axis and Allies WWI
Mar
24
revised response with 4 cards in major and long (6+) minor
added 75 characters in body
Mar
24
answered response with 4 cards in major and long (6+) minor
Mar
20
revised In Bridge, What is the Merit of Taking a “Double” Finesse?
deleted 6 characters in body; edited title
Feb
15
asked In bridge, does it make sense to “shade” one's bidding standards with a part score?
Feb
11
comment What is the “pause” rule for dummy play in tournament bridge?
@TimLymington: Related but not quite a dupe. This question was about what pauses were MANDATED by tournaments. (I think it's 5-10 seconds.) The other question was, can I ask for a time out, "outside" the "system."
Feb
10
comment In bridge, should you be more careful with takeout doubles over one spade?
The problem is that if you give the same hand to my LHO, I'm down three (at the two level). Doubled, that's more than the value of most games, unless I'm non-vulnerable against vulnerable. Which is why I would make a takeout double in that situation and not otherwise.
Feb
9
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
8
accepted What are good reasons to lead dummy's first bid suit?
Feb
8
revised In bridge, should you be more careful with takeout doubles over one spade?
Added explanatory paragraph
Feb
8
revised In bridge, should you be more careful with takeout doubles over one spade?
Added explanatory paragraph
Feb
7
comment In bridge, should you be more careful with takeout doubles over one spade?
amalloy: With the takeout double example I described, I expect partner to make five tricks if he has "nothing." So I am "borrowing" two tricks for take out at the one level. But I am "borrowing" THREE tricks for take out at the two level (over one spade). I'm willing to borrow two tricks but not three (as in your 2NT example), which is why I am unwilling to make a takeout double when vulnerable. (-800 points is more than the game that the opponents will make if partner has nothing, -500 is OK.)
Feb
7
asked What is the “pause” rule for dummy play in tournament bridge?
Feb
7
comment In bridge, should you be more careful with takeout doubles over one spade?
What you said is true, because "all finesses are wrong." When "stress-testing" my hand for "nothing" in partner, I do not make that assumption, and that's why I evaluate my hand at "six" tricks. Give my partner six points, say Kxx QJx xxx xxxx and your lie of cards, and we'd still go down (by 1-2), even if we had 27 hcps between us. My evaluations, six tricks with "nothing," nine if partner has six hcps, assume a "reasonable "lie" of cards.
Feb
7
comment Does Monopoly involve skill to a considerable degree?
@John: That's why a skillful but unlucky player can beat a lucky player that doesn't understand things.
Feb
7
comment Does Monopoly involve skill to a considerable degree?
@corsiKa: If "that is not a bluff, that is a lie," then Monopoly is NOT a game of perfect information, because the recipient can't tell the difference.
Feb
7
comment In bridge, should you be more careful with takeout doubles over one spade?
You can make six tricks in 2NT with your hand (not four), and your opponents probably don't have enough to double, (unless one opponent has almost all the outstanding values). If partner has six points, he will be good for two tricks in his hand, plus a third from "synergy" (e.g. a finesse into your hand) for a total of nine. When you bid one spade, you have 4.5-5 tricks if partner has "nothing." So, in effect, you are "borrowing" 2 to 2.5 tricks for all your opening bids.