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Nov
8
comment With which “non-trump” holdings is a 4-4 fit superior to a 5-4 fit?
@PieterGeerkens:Then a 4-4 fit needs an "imbalance" in side suits to shine. Ideally a partnership holding of 8-8-5-5 (or better), rather than 8-6-6-6 (unless the latter were something like 4-2-4-3 opposite 4-4-2-3). That was the point of the question.
Nov
8
comment With which “non-trump” holdings is a 4-4 fit superior to a 5-4 fit?
@PieterGeerkens: If I have 5-4-3-1 opposite 4-4-1-4, I prefer the 4-4 fit in hearts to the 5-4 fit in spades, because spades is a "long suit that might yield an extra trick. But If the shapes were 4-3-3-3, opposite 4-3-3-3, the 4-4 fit doesn't seem to do me much good, and I'd prefer a 5-3-3-2 opposite the 4-3-3-3 with the extra trump and an "imbalance. Put another way, I might be inclined to bid one higher with 5-3-2-2 opposite a (presumed) 4-3-3-3 than with 4-3-3-3 opposite the same 4-3-3-3. In the other deal, the trick-taking potential was maximized by the 4-4 fit.Or am I missing something?
Nov
7
comment Where does the phrase “MTG is not a game about reflexes” come from?
And I'm saying that MTG players are drawn to a greater degree from players of computer games (according to my 24-year old nephew), than are bridge and poker players. Unlike poker and bridge, MTG basically grew up with the "Millennial" generation.
Nov
4
comment With what kind of trump holdings is a 4-4 trump fit superior?
OK, so the 5-4 heart suit is better as a long suit for a discard of the low diamond.
Oct
29
comment With what kind of trump holdings is a 4-4 trump fit superior?
OK, I see. In a NT contract, a 4-4 fit could be a "stopper" in an otherwise weak suit (making 1 trick on length against a 3-2 split of opposing honors), while your high cards concentrated in short suits take the remaining eight tricks. Ditto for two tricks (one or both of them a ruff) in a ten-trick suit contract.
Oct
27
comment How does one evaluate the “strength” of a hand in Magic the Gathering?
"What actually constitutes a good or bad hand is highly situational." Then it would NOT seem that the question is a duplicate of "when do I take a mulligan," because THAT doesn't seem highly situational. Nor is the question unanswerable since you answered it.
Oct
27
comment Do “flat” hands devalue a 4-4 trump fit?
@Aryabhata: I'd feel the other way. With 25-27, I'm hoping that my holding is good for nine at 3NT. It's with 28 or more that I'd try a ten trick trump contract on "brute force," without hoping for ruffing help.
Oct
26
comment How does one evaluate the “strength” of a hand in Magic the Gathering?
@AlexP: That's exactly the point. If you have a "trailing" hand or position, you play "all out" and hope to "get lucky." If you're ahead, you try to control the variation and win by "attrition."
Oct
26
comment How does one evaluate the “strength” of a hand in Magic the Gathering?
@Jefromi: That's what I learned from asking the question. As Alex P. wrote, "A good hand is a good plan," meaning that it offers a good story line. I would guess that a bad hand is one from which you can't easily fashion a coherent strategy. But I might retain a nominally "weak" hand with a good plan rather than take a mulligan. I'm learning the game to play with my nephew, and am a rank beginner.
Oct
26
comment How does one evaluate the “strength” of a hand in Magic the Gathering?
@Rainbolt: I would want to know whether i am "strong" and therefore a favorite against a random, average hand, so I might "play not to lose" rather than "play to win." I would also want to know whether I have a "come" hand with "potential," and therefore NOT take a mulligan even if I have hand that's nominally "weak" (like four to a flush or straight in poker, that's nominally weaker than a pair of twos).
Oct
22
comment Are there quasi “official” rankings of board games?
I did my best to clarify the question by asking for "authoritative" surveys and nominate it for reopening in its current form.
Oct
20
comment Do you need more to “pre-empt” with a major, than a minor suit?
You'd open a good 6 card club suit at 3C, because 2C is "strong." And clubs is the lowest denomination, and most likely to be "taken out" anyway.
Oct
16
comment Does the “housing shortage” rule suggest that you should often refrain from buying hotels in monopoly?
Welcome to the site. An upvote for a good answer, although I did edit your comment to take out the "slang."
Oct
10
comment How did the Greek campaign affect Afrika Korps?
As I remember, the Paratroop Corps lost almost as many men as the British, but were far more "strategic."
Oct
10
comment How did the Greek campaign affect Afrika Korps?
OK, added a disclaimer in parentheses to clarify the question. Based on your answer, there would have been (practically) "no game" if all of those forces had been sent to Egypt initially.
Sep
30
comment Was a bridge column “resulting” when it criticized an opening lead?
I "second" your second comment. Thanks to Aryabhata for showing me it could be done. Next time I'll do that.
Sep
28
comment Was a bridge column “resulting” when it criticized an opening lead?
@AlexanderWoo: This is a bit beyond me. I'm an "old timer" who would go to three hearts on four trumps.
Sep
28
comment Was a bridge column “resulting” when it criticized an opening lead?
@Aryabhata: It may just have been a stylistic thing, that the article said that "a normal result is achieved when errors cancel out; a diamond lead would have beaten the contract but West made the natural lead of a spade..." so I took that as saying that West made an error.
Sep
28
comment Was a bridge column “resulting” when it criticized an opening lead?
@Aryabhata: The New York Post. A Murdoch paper. September 24, 2015. I read a hard copy, not a link.
Sep
28
comment Was a bridge column “resulting” when it criticized an opening lead?
@PieterGeerkens: Given North's hand in my response to Alexander, South took the singleton Ace of Spades in dummy, crossed to his hand with the AK of clubs, back to dummy with a spade ruff, led out the Q of clubs (which held), while discarding a diamond from his hand. Then the last club, discarding the second diamond, in hand, loser on loser. East made this trick and the A of hearts and that was it. The lead of the 3 of diamonds looks "random," but represents the best chance for 2 tricks. With a third to come elswhere.