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location New York, New York
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visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen 17 hours ago

I play a number of board and card games with varying degrees of skill, but using "algorithms" to avoid the most obvious mistakes. Depending on the game, if you can beat me, you are probably not a beginner, and perhaps a pretty good player.


Feb
7
comment In bridge, should you be more careful with takeout doubles over one spade?
What you said is true, because "all finesses are wrong." When "stress-testing" my hand for "nothing" in partner, I do not make that assumption, and that's why I evaluate my hand at "six" tricks. Give my partner six points, say Kxx QJx xxx xxxx and your lie of cards, and we'd still go down (by 1-2), even if we had 27 hcps between us. My evaluations, six tricks with "nothing," nine if partner has six hcps, assume a "reasonable "lie" of cards.
Feb
7
comment Does Monopoly involve skill to a considerable degree?
@John: That's why a skillful but unlucky player can beat a lucky player that doesn't understand things.
Feb
7
comment Does Monopoly involve skill to a considerable degree?
@corsiKa: If "that is not a bluff, that is a lie," then Monopoly is NOT a game of perfect information, because the recipient can't tell the difference.
Feb
7
comment In bridge, should you be more careful with takeout doubles over one spade?
You can make six tricks in 2NT with your hand (not four), and your opponents probably don't have enough to double, (unless one opponent has almost all the outstanding values). If partner has six points, he will be good for two tricks in his hand, plus a third from "synergy" (e.g. a finesse into your hand) for a total of nine. When you bid one spade, you have 4.5-5 tricks if partner has "nothing." So, in effect, you are "borrowing" 2 to 2.5 tricks for all your opening bids.
Feb
6
comment Does Monopoly involve skill to a considerable degree?
@corsiKa: In your poker example, you don't tell your opponent whether or not you have a straight flush card in the "hole." You just bet as if you do, and let your opponent draw his own conclusions. As for Monopoly, $150 for utilities is about the same as maroons, and the utilities' UNIMPROVED rent is better. The bluffer just leaves out the part about houses.
Feb
6
comment Does Monopoly involve skill to a considerable degree?
@corsiKa: A skillful player I once knew tried to bluff someone that two utilities were worth as much as two maroons (which would have given him a monopoly). Which he might have to do to win, if the lesser skilled player got one or more monopolies, plus "stoppers" to all others.
Feb
2
comment Has anyone experienced “too many players” in a game of monopoly?
@PatomaS: Good point.
Feb
2
comment Has anyone experienced “too many players” in a game of monopoly?
@dsas: Based on your experiences, four players is manageable, maybe five, but 6 and 7 are going to suffer.
Feb
1
comment Has anyone experienced “too many players” in a game of monopoly?
Which basically depends on the first dice roll, prior to the game.
Jan
31
comment Has anyone experienced “too many players” in a game of monopoly?
@GendoIkari: Based on what experiences you've had with the game? The question asked you to relate your relevant experiences.
Jan
28
comment In bridge, should East consider “overtaking” his partner's lead if able?
I thought that kind of play was a bit unusual (order of magnitude 1 in 10) but I didn't realize that it was "rare" (more like 1 in 100).
Jan
26
comment What are good reasons to lead dummy's first bid suit?
Finding: You and I seemed to agree that it could be good for West to lead a singleton, (possibly a doubleton), for a potential ruff, while avoiding such leads with three of a suit. My mapping algorithms suggests that this could be a good lead if "anyone" (even partner or declarer) probably has a singleton, while a likely 4-3-3-3 distribution is bad for this kind of lead.
Jan
26
comment In bridge, should East consider “overtaking” his partner's lead if able?
I opined that East should CONSIDER overtaking partner's lead, not that he should automatically do so. The "other information" he has is part of that consideration.
Jan
25
comment In bridge, should East consider “overtaking” his partner's lead if able?
@PieterGeerkens: One of the problems I am trying to deal with in bridge is one of what I call "redundant honors." That is being unwilling to sacrifice an honor by "unblocking," or save an entry by overtaking, or ditching a potential throw in honor for good, strategic reasons. I'm not sure about the average player, but I lose more tricks and games by wrongly "conserving" than by sacrificing honors.
Jan
20
comment Bidding response to convenient minor bid
Thank you for your reply. Greatly appreciated. My misunderstanding.
Jan
20
comment Bidding response to convenient minor bid
I've heard of things like "Bergen raises," where opener bids one of a five card major, and responder raises to four, with five trumps and zero points (law of total tricks). Is that also prohibited, or is it allowed because it is "non-forcing." Is there a ACBL link that shows what is permitted, and what is not?
Jan
15
comment In Axis and Allies, is the Axis “economic victory” condition a valid one?
Interesting. At the beginning, the Axis have larger armies to compensate for lesser industrial capacity. In this version, the Americans have a larger army, "ready to land," (plus the advantage of the last move), to compensate for the lower industrial capacity. Butting barring such temporary advantages, superior "industrial capacity" usually wins in the long run.
Jan
12
comment Bridge: Matchpoints vs IMPs: Different game?
I made the question more objective by asking for "experience" with actual rankings, and wonder if it can be reopened in its current form.
Jan
2
comment In bridge, how would you bid the “worst” 14 point hand?
With 12-13 HCP I would probably "punt" by passing. The meaning of the question was, what do you do when you have a rare hand that falls into the "cracks" between your various conventions? My "convention card" would read, "15-17 point NTs, five card majors, four card diamonds, three card clubs." But I reserve the right to deviate with a hand like the above (for the question, I deliberately constructed one that is on the edge in every way.) But thanks for a good answer.
Jan
2
comment Did a bridge column make errors in discussing a hand?
@Aryabhata: I am by no means an "extraordinary" player, but East's defense is indicated to me by my algorithms. In my group, I am considered "intermediate," (based on results), but with the highest potential, since our bridge teacher considers my algorithms "beyond her." My goal is to develop algorithms or heuristics to make currently "extraordinary" plays accessible to average players.