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Mar
23
comment How do game designers come up with suggested (or minimum) age requirements for games?
Can you clarify whether this is personal reflection or whether this comes from being (or talking to) a game designer? Also - about reading: My 7 year old son just a few weeks ago started reading at a level where it would be useful in games. Yet for 2 years he has played games (and well) that require reading (i.e. Settlers of Catan: Development Cards). He memorizes the way written cards look. Perhaps a game recommendation of 12+ (which is Settlers) really means that at least one person playing must be 12 or over in order to be able to read, understand, and explain the rules?
Mar
23
asked How do game designers come up with suggested (or minimum) age requirements for games?
Mar
21
accepted Bottom card drawn during epidemic: Are 3 cubes added to the city pictured, when the disease in that city's region has already been eradicated?
Mar
21
revised Bottom card drawn during epidemic: Are 3 cubes added to the city pictured, when the disease in that city's region has already been eradicated?
grammar correction in title
Mar
21
asked Bottom card drawn during epidemic: Are 3 cubes added to the city pictured, when the disease in that city's region has already been eradicated?
Mar
19
comment How does Rat-a-tat-cat strategy change as the number of players increases?
We never come close to exhausting the draw pile. But you reasoning made me realize that hidden information begins to be revealed as the draw pile gets close to exhausted, for those who precisely track all cards played. Not very many people can do this, and kids are even less likely to. But theoretically if there are only 3 cards left in the draw pile in a 2 player game, it means that you have seen nearly all the cards already, and can make some good guesses about the opponents hidden cards whose values you don't already know (especially if the remaining 3 undrawn cards are all high cards).
Mar
19
comment How does Rat-a-tat-cat strategy change as the number of players increases?
Swap cards also mess up your conclusions for what happens if 2 players go through an entire deck, rationally. Because swaps will insure that some higher cards get slotted into peoples' hands.
Mar
19
comment How does Rat-a-tat-cat strategy change as the number of players increases?
My son called it "cheating" but the rules do not prohibit this sort of false-carding combined with faked facial expressions. In fact, over the course of large numbers of games, it can be good strategy to sometimes even worsen the card a little so that it makes people think twice about swapping. However, if you decide to set up a simulation, you'll need to make assumptions so perhaps your assumption is worth making just to keep the simulation simple enough that it won't take hundreds of hours of your time.
Mar
19
comment How does Rat-a-tat-cat strategy change as the number of players increases?
I appreciate the start and in a spirit of cooperation I offer some refinement to your observations. First: your assumption on discarding a known card. This is a poker-like game of facial expressions. There is a swap card. So there can be good reason to replace a 9 with a 9. I pulled it once against my son, with an expression of delight. As luck would have it, he did draw a swap card, and because he had two good outer cards, he swapped an unknown inner card to me which turned out to be a 1, and he got my 9 in return. Then he called for an end.
Mar
18
comment How does Rat-a-tat-cat strategy change as the number of players increases?
@user1873 Agree that the large number of hidden cards (combined with 4 other people taking turns after you call for an end) makes the determination difficult. Which is why I asked the question. It's surprising how much this is to this seemingly simple game aimed at kids less than 10 years old. Significantly more complex than most other little kid card games I've seen.
Mar
18
asked How does Rat-a-tat-cat strategy change as the number of players increases?
Mar
15
comment What are some good ways to transition to more complex strategic thinking games?
@Konerak Based on multiple comments from you and StasK, I did add a line to the Stategy-only type of player indicating the willingness of some of these types of players to tolerate modest amounts of luck so long as skill matters the most.
Mar
14
revised Do the vast majority of Rat-a-tat Cat rounds end very quickly?
shortened title, which also made it more accurately reflect the Q&A
Mar
14
accepted Do the vast majority of Rat-a-tat Cat rounds end very quickly?
Mar
14
comment Do the vast majority of Rat-a-tat Cat rounds end very quickly?
I just carefully reread the rules and you are correct - I was doing it wrong. For such a simple game, it is remarkable how poorly the rules are written. I've now read through them at least 4 times and every time I've discovered things I was doing incorrectly.
Mar
13
comment Do the vast majority of Rat-a-tat Cat rounds end very quickly?
Thanks for correcting. Interesting that my guess of "4" was so far off from your 2.63 derived from simulation. BTW, by my interpretation of the rules, you can swap the peek card into your hand if you want. So a "peek" card is therefore not "worse than useless." You can replace a 9 with it, which in turn leads to a random draw, whose average will be around 5. Not sure if that means the 2.63 increases slightly.
Mar
13
comment Do the vast majority of Rat-a-tat Cat rounds end very quickly?
Your answer cites <10 while I had calculated <6 (based on the idea that a typical last draw by opponents will drop their score of 20 by 4 (i.e. a 9 gets replaced by 5). Can you elaborate as to why 10 as opposed to 6?
Mar
12
revised Do the vast majority of Rat-a-tat Cat rounds end very quickly?
The were several ambiguities in the explanation portion of question. Made more precise.
Mar
12
accepted Is Duplicate Bridge (standard Matchpoints) a game of pure skill?
Mar
12
accepted Promised future trades as part of legal trades? (Solution described, alternatives/comments requested)