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12h
comment Band of Misfits and Throne Room
Note that there was recently a lengthy discussion about this, which resulted in Donald X actually changing a previous ruling, and saying that Palying BoM as another card counts as playing 2 actions. See here: forum.dominionstrategy.com/index.php?topic=13115.0
2d
comment Rule set that prevents close out
Seems like you can simply house rule that a move is illegal if it creates a close out.
May
26
comment What exactly does the “If you do […]” clause on Mimic Vat check for?
@ikegami, in which situation? With Mimic Vat, you do get to choose; that's the card in question.
May
26
comment What exactly does the “If you do […]” clause on Mimic Vat check for?
In the example given in the OP, the second interpretation is correct, because the card in question has a "may," so the relevant part of the rule is "checks whether the player chose". For a card without a may, it would be different, and I can't think of any good way in English to phrase it ("if you do" doesn't matter if you did)...
May
26
comment What exactly does the “If you do […]” clause on Mimic Vat check for?
@ikegami I am reading his first interpretation as a literal English sentence. "If you exiled the card"... something that is only true if the card was in fact exiled. You are reading it with knowledge of MTG rule in mind, knowing that in MTG "if you exiled the card" can be true even if you didn't end up exiling a card. But in plain English language, that doesn't make sense.
May
26
comment What exactly does the “If you do […]” clause on Mimic Vat check for?
@ikegami clearly we're simply each reading the actual sentence differently. I see it as him asking if you really need to do the thing in question.
May
26
comment What exactly does the “If you do […]” clause on Mimic Vat check for?
@ikegami I understand that... and the reason that is true is because the second interpretation is true... it doesn't matter "if you actually do" the thing. It just matters if you tried to do the thing.
May
26
comment What exactly does the “If you do […]” clause on Mimic Vat check for?
From your example, it sounds like you are reading the first interpretation wrong. The first interpretation is that what matters is if the card actually does get exiled. In this case, the card does NOT end up getting exiled, so it would fail the "if you do [exile the card]" test.
May
26
comment What exactly does the “If you do […]” clause on Mimic Vat check for?
@ikegami I referred to the wrong part of the rule I think. Right before that "checks whether the player chose to pay..." This is the second interpretation listed in the OP. The first interpretation (the wrong one) is that it doesn't matter if you CHOSE to do the thing, it matters if you actually DID do the thing. I'm not sure what you mean with your example there; it doesn't contradict what we're saying.
May
26
comment What exactly does the “If you do […]” clause on Mimic Vat check for?
@ikegami I don't understand. The last part of that rule, the part you bolded in your answer, says that the second interpretation is correct. With the first interpretation, you would NOT actually return the currently imprinted card to your graveyard, because you did not end up exiling the new card.
May
25
comment Can creatures with Trample only be played with other creatures with Trample?
It is not clear what you are asking. If what you say we're the case, how could you ever play your first creature with trample?
May
24
comment How does stacking and resolving work exactly?
Worth mentioning that in tournaments (and often in casual play), priority is passed by default unless you state that you want to keep it.
May
19
comment Can I shortcut a loop with conditional actions?
@Guvante, Note that the OP specifies Darksteel Forge in play to avoid this issue. However, I believe that the answer should be the same either way; it's just the difference between needing about 2 million flips, and needing somewhere around 2^1000000 flips.
May
19
comment Can I shortcut a loop with conditional actions?
@Guvante I believe that's the number of expected failures before you hit your goal, but each failure will take between 1 and 999,999 coin flips. Also, it's hard to define "expected" number here; a good question to ask would be how many flips you would need until you have more than a 50% chance of having hit your goal.
May
19
comment Can I shortcut a loop with conditional actions?
I think the question is worth considering without Darksteel Forge in play also. In this case, to get to a million Wireflies, you need some insanely huge number of iterations (some number with a few hundred thousand digits in it approximately). But given infinite time; you could still do it.
May
19
comment Can I shortcut a loop with conditional actions?
"Conditional actions" seems to be defined by the next few words: "where the outcome of a game event determines the next action a player takes. " In this case, the outcome of the game event does NOT determine the next action a player takes.
May
17
comment Can my opponent force me to play out a demonstrated loop?
Or Tavern Swindler. (Ok, that one is a bad example because you would be on average gaining 3 life every turn, so the other combo won't ever kill you)
May
17
comment Can my opponent force me to play out a demonstrated loop?
Wirefly Hive could work as an example. Every turn, in response to Time Stop being cast, you could flip a coin to possibly create a new Wirefly; or to destroy your Wireflies. Neither result can help end the combo, but you are certainly changing the gamestate with every flip.
May
17
comment Can my opponent force me to play out a demonstrated loop?
So if the opponent had something like Mana Screw in play (or some legal card that he can tap for a coin flip; even if the result of the flip wouldn't matter), could he say it needs to be played out because the flip result is part of the game state?
May
17
comment Can my opponent force me to play out a demonstrated loop?
His opponent could cast shock during upkeep, in response to Time Stop, but he would need to have a combo-ending card in hand or on the battlefield. In that case he can reject the shortcut and instead end the combo.