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location Utah
age 31
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Aug 31 at 0:06

Some of my favorite board and card games:

Bang! Memoir '44 Bohnanza Pandemic Ticket to Ride Settlers of Catan

Some of my favorite games played with playing cards:

  • ♠ Spades W - preset trump; trick-taking
  • ♥ Hearts W - "evasion-type" trick-taking
  • Euchre W - 24-card; trick-taking
  • Pinochle W - 48-card; trick-taking
  • Spite and Malice W - competitive solitaire (Skip-Bo W is a variation of this game)
  • Egyptian Ratscrew W - speed; matching

I feel reasonably knowledgeable about the following games, and own many of them (alphabetical order):

  • Bang!
    • Dodge City expansion
    • Fistful of Cards expansion
  • Castle Risk
  • Blokus
  • Blokus: Trigon
  • Bohnanza
    • High Bohn expansion
  • ♥ Hearts
  • Memoir '44
  • Pirates' Cove
  • Risk
  • Scrabble — I stink at it, though!
  • Sequence
  • Skip-Bo
  • ♠ Spades
  • Spite and Malice
  • Ticket to Ride
    • 1910 expansion
  • Ticket to Ride: Switzerland
  • Ticket to Ride: The Card Game

My least favorite games:

  • Monopoly* — It lasts hours, it's not very intellectually or socially entertaining, you have all sorts of house rules (many of which break the game or prolong an already insufferable game), people say they don't like board games when they really just hate Monopoly and haven't discovered better games....
  • Risk — The game is actually quite fixable, it's just that it's normally not very enjoyable. I think it's the worst when people make alliances based on factors outside of the game, or when people change how they're playing because they're losing and they decide they (don't) want a certain person to win. I also don't like how strong of a factor luck is in the game. A person with poor strategy can often beat a person with good strategy just out of luck. However, playing on the computer with nearly-instant attack resolution and playing with missions are both improvements. So are the variants like Risk 2210 and Castle Risk.

May
6
comment How Unethical Is A Purely “Blocking” Move In Ticket To Ride?
It seems like your question isn't really about whether it's ethical (it just boils down to the question of whether it's cheating) but instead about whether it's good sportsmanship, wise, or polite. Andrey's comment is the correct answer if you're truly wondering about ethics.
May
6
revised How to reduce total screw-overs in Ticket to Ride so there's always a potential path toward victory?
Discovered that keeping destination tickets secret is part of the official rules; added a comment about it to the end of my answer.
May
6
answered Correlation between a destination ticket's point value and the leastnumber of train cars it would take to fulfill it
May
6
answered TTR: Destination ticket value changes in the America 1910 expansion
May
3
revised Good board games for single player
Added a heading for better readability/visibility (with a link to Blokus' official site)
May
3
revised Interesting boardgames to play with children.
Corrected spelling of "Blokus"
Apr
30
answered How does Rook compare in difficulty to other trick-taking games?
Mar
9
comment Why do some board games have long-lasting appeal?
@warren: That would be nice; I think the house rules are mainly responsible for all the long games I've played (things like winner-is-the-last-one-bankrupted, haggling over trades, pick up tax money when landing on free parking). Unfortunately, some of these house rules have become incorporated into the rules. Also, its lack of intellectual or social entertainment value also makes it feel long. I think one reason why there are so many house rules (even all the bad ones) is that the game is so boring when played by the official rules.
Mar
9
answered How to reduce total screw-overs in Ticket to Ride so there's always a potential path toward victory?
Mar
9
comment Why do some board games have long-lasting appeal?
Luck is important because, I agree, predictability is boring. I'd also comment that the reason why some people don't like too much luck is that luck comes at the cost of the feeling of control. I agree with Csíkszentmihályi's theory of Flow, in that the most enjoyable state of mind can only be achieved in activities where one can believe he/she has a certain level of control of the situation.
Mar
9
comment Why do some board games have long-lasting appeal?
@warren: I don't know about Lo'oris, but here's why I dislike Monopoly so much (Copied from my user profile): It lasts hours, it's not very intellectually or socially entertaining, you have all sorts of house rules (many of which break the game or prolong an already insufferable game), people say they don't like board games when they really just hate Monopoly and haven't discovered better games.
Mar
9
comment Why do some board games have long-lasting appeal?
For the curious (like me), here's a link to the Wikipedia article on Dog/Tock (currently a stub): en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tock
Feb
22
comment Proper Punishment for Parrot Perdition, in Pirate's Cove
Heh, yeah, it is quite alliterative, isn't it? :D
Feb
22
comment Boosting Sails, in Pirate's Cove
It may be relevant to note that, regarding Parrot cards, the rules state: "If a parrot is hurt during battle but survives to victory or flees alive to Pirate’s Cove, it will automatically heal its wound. Put its card back in its initial upward position during the Upgrade phase."
Feb
22
comment Proper Punishment for Parrot Perdition, in Pirate's Cove
I was confused, for a while, by the title case in your question title. I thought you were referring to something properly called Parrot Perdition, instead of just a term you created to describe your situation. Perhaps you could rephrase your question title like so: "In Pirate's Cove, what if I'm supposed to lose more fame points than I have?".
Feb
15
comment Boosting Sails, in Pirate's Cove
@thesunneversets: I think it's awesome that this is your favorite answer, because I'm a rules nazi and liked my deck composition answer the best. (Also, that answer is the one that would be most likely to sway my typical gaming companions.) I hadn't expected that you'd like this one the best! It's a good reminder that one approach won't resolve all disagreements about rules for all people.
Feb
15
comment Boosting Sails, in Pirate's Cove
This argument is the one that made me think, "I should probably split these into separate answers." I didn't want other arguments ignored because of this argument's weakness.
Feb
15
comment Boosting Sails, in Pirate's Cove
By the way, after seeing this and your other Pirate's Cove questions, I thought to myself, "those were good questions. I wonder what other questions thesunneversets has asked." Lo and behold, I find that you've asked lots of the questions I've recently enjoyed. So, thank you for your great questions!
Feb
15
comment Boosting Sails, in Pirate's Cove
@thesunneversets: LOL. I wish it didn't have to be that wordy (or legalese-like) to be that clear. But if that were the case, we wouldn't have this problem, would we? :) I guess the assumption here is that the deck was composed the way it was for a reason—and my answer explains what I would think the game designer's reasoning would be.
Feb
15
comment Boosting Sails, in Pirate's Cove
@thesunneversets: Very true. I think this is the weakest of my arguments. I still included it because (1) Legendary pirates are the only counter-example, and (2) Even in the case of legendary pirates, you're never expected to use stuff like counters to represent hits on an upgradeable part—legendary pirates just return to full strength after battle, AFAIK.