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Jun
6
comment Can an investigator ever have more than 1 of a kind of condition
Isn't there more than one kind of madness condition?
Jun
2
comment When races are defeated, do the tokens all go back to the tray for redraw (if power allows)?
@bwarner Thanks, I haven't played Underground yet, that is indeed a good example. Edited to hopefully make everyone happy!
Jun
2
revised When races are defeated, do the tokens all go back to the tray for redraw (if power allows)?
deleted 12 characters in body
Jun
2
revised When races are defeated, do the tokens all go back to the tray for redraw (if power allows)?
added 2 characters in body
Jun
2
comment When races are defeated, do the tokens all go back to the tray for redraw (if power allows)?
@GendoIkari I've seen plenty of games with those races and I've never seen them get close to running out of tokens. It seems like the opponents would have to be playing incredibly poorly to let that happen, and by the time someone managed to get all the tokens out of the tray they'd already be winning so completely that the limited number of tokens wouldn't change anything.
Jun
2
answered When races are defeated, do the tokens all go back to the tray for redraw (if power allows)?
Jun
2
revised How does Nature Shields Its Own work with “unblockable” and “can't be blocked”
deleted 9 characters in body; edited title
Jun
1
revised Can a creature be killed by damage from two different instants?
deleted 2 characters in body; edited title
May
31
comment Is Magic: The Gathering a consistent game?
As for the part you now say was relevant, look again at my original comment: "though as other answer point out...". I totally agree that this answer isn't entirely correct about the game going on indefinitely. This is all merely a response to what you actually wrote in your first comment.
May
31
comment Is Magic: The Gathering a consistent game?
@ikegami Like I said, if the rules contradict themselves, then the game is in an undefined state (you can't tell what should happen). That's equivalent to the contrapositive, that if the game is not in an undefined state, the rules haven't contradicted themselves. So the bolded statement implies that there are no rules contradictions, and answers the OP's question. Whether it's a good answer is another matter, but "that's not what the OP asked is at the very least an exaggeration, and not a good starting point for a discussion about the merits of the answer.
May
31
comment Is Magic: The Gathering a consistent game?
Sure, I totally agree, from a pure rules standpoint. I'm just saying that in casual play, sitting there indefinitely like that is no more likely than in a tournament. It's just that instead of a judge it'll be the players themselves who decide to call it quits. Maybe it'd be clearer if you just said "From a pure rules standpoint, it's possible..." rather than pointing to casual play?
May
30
comment Is Magic: The Gathering a consistent game?
@ikegami The OP asked more than one thing. If at some point the rules contradicted themselves as to what happens, that'd be an undefined state. So it seems the bolded text is an answer to the first part of the question, and then the paragraph afterwards addresses infinite loops (though as other answers point out, that's not the only way it could go on indefinitely).
May
30
comment Is Magic: The Gathering a consistent game?
I'd argue that in practice the indefinite loop thing isn't actually that much different in casual play. Sure, there's not actually a judge, but in the real world, someone's eventually going to get annoyed and do roughly what the judge would do: refuse to keep playing and figure it's a draw.
May
30
comment What do you do when one or more adults is upset or acting inappropriately?
@Joey For what it's worth, it seems okay to me. This is a specific enough situation, and while there are surely multiple possible answers, that doesn't necessarily mean it's too broad. The biggest improvements I can think of are avoiding the word "broader", and rephrasing to ask more clearly about general approaches, since the current formulation sounds like you might be asking for stories.
May
29
comment Multiple permanents entering the battlefield simultaneously and “Enter the Battlefield” effects
@murgatroid99 Right, but when we get a new question that's about one of these two cases, might it be less confusing to point them at a canonical that's about only one of them? Or are you saying you think people might find this one by searching but not the others?
May
29
comment Multiple permanents entering the battlefield simultaneously and “Enter the Battlefield” effects
I haven't looked at the possible past duplicates carefully, but I can say that my first thought on seeing this question was confusion - the title says "enter the battlefield" which generally means triggered abilities, while the question asks about both triggered abilities and replacement effects. Definitely makes more sense to me to separate the two. (Yes, a beginner wouldn't see the difference, but fortunately those of us who'll be closing questions as duplicates of canonical questions aren't beginners!)
May
27
comment How inappropriate is it to track semi-secret information using paper or other memory aids?
This does sound reasonable on the surface, but I think you get into trouble when you start applying this to games where note-taking is clearly just straight-up extra information, stuff that no one but a savant would be able to keep track of otherwise. At that point, you're effectively replacing (partially) hidden information with known/public information, which inevitably changes the game - and changing the game is not in general socially acceptable without prior agreement.
May
27
comment How inappropriate is it to track semi-secret information using paper or other memory aids?
And to be clear, I'm not talking about a casual experience. You can have a very thought-provoking, competitive game without complete information. Perhaps it's helpful to look at it this way: given a choice between a 4-hour game where you agonize over details and wait for others to do the same, and two 2-hour games with incomplete information but still plenty to think about, which would you pick?
May
27
comment How inappropriate is it to track semi-secret information using paper or other memory aids?
@GWLlosa I'm not talking about forcing people to analyze; they're doing that already. I'm talking about about analysis paralysis, forcing people to drastically overanalyze. Often, if you give people complete information, they'll start spending many times longer to decide every single action. A two hour game can turn into a three or four hour game. And often it's all for tiny little advantages. See for example Power Grid, where the designers deliberately said to keep money secret to avoid this in the endgame.
May
27
comment How inappropriate is it to track semi-secret information using paper or other memory aids?
The thing is, the mere fact that your memory has suddenly become perfect and complete (or at least much more so than without taking notes) is extremely likely to bog down the game and make it less fun. Asking questions isn't the big concern, it's analysis paralysis and forcing others to do it too in order to compete.