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12h
comment Grand slam bidding with high card points hand
Also, any commentary you can provide on your partner's capabilities will be useful. If partner is a timid declarer, I would rather play a sure small slam in my hand that a nerve-wracking grand by partner. If parent is a timid bidder I will need to plan a sequence of forcing bids, whereas with an over ambitious partner I might need to under bid by one or two points.
12h
comment Grand slam bidding with high card points hand
It is also essential to know your general system approach, and what slam-bidding conventions you have agreed on with partner. With a casual partner bidding a Grand Slam is nearly always going to be a crap shoot, so I would in that case usually be happy to bid Small Slam when Grand makes. The opportunity cost for going one down in grand is just too high in a casual game.
12h
comment Grand slam bidding with high card points hand
Also note that 24 points in a single hand, without compensating distribution, is barely enough to struggle to 2NT with a couple of scattered jacks in partner's hand; Maybe 3NT if you are lucky. If partner cannot respond to an opening of 1 in a suit you are rarely making small slam, never mind a Grand Slam.,
12h
comment Grand slam bidding with high card points hand
Please give us an actual hand, or at least a good outline of one. Depending on how many bids I expect to require to describe a hand of this strength, I might open any of: 1 of longest suit; 1 of highest-ranking suit; 2C strong and forcing; 1 in my longest minor suit; 2NT; 4NT Blackwood; 5 of longest suit if agreed to be slam invitational. As you can see the variety of possible openings is very wide, which is why an outline of the hand at least, and the specific holdings if possible, is required to give an answer..
1d
comment Rule set that prevents close out
@GendoIkari: Or else learn how to play and time a back-game. I have won perhaps 20-25% of games in which the opponent has created a close-out against me, by slowing my game down appropriately. This is a key skill of an expert backgammon player, perhaps even of a strong intermediate player. At a 25% chance of winning it is even appropriate to accept a double - but only if one has successfully slowed to the right pace.
2d
comment Rule set that prevents close out
Au contraire; learn to love it instead of fighting it.
May
17
comment Practicing Go for a beginner
For starters: Joseki; Tesugi; Openings (just as in Chess); Life and Death;
May
16
revised Bidding: How to figure out if responder has 4 carder or 5 carder major?
added 3 characters in body
May
16
answered Bidding: How to figure out if responder has 4 carder or 5 carder major?
May
10
comment What is the longest possible suit for a player in a par-zero-deal?
Your answer has some interest, but should not assume that every reader has access to automated analysis. Present it properly, and give play outline for a couple of contracts (such as 1S by either side), and you will undoubtedly get some upvotes.
May
10
reviewed Close What are the chances of shooting the moon in Hearts?
May
10
reviewed Close Where can I practice MTG draft online and actually play against my opponents for free?
May
10
reviewed Leave Open Is there a Magic intro deck that focuses on lifestealing?
Apr
29
revised Probabilities: Backgammon - final move
Corrected a couple of transcription errors
Apr
28
revised Probabilities: Backgammon - final move
added 1324 characters in body
Apr
28
answered Probabilities: Backgammon - final move
Apr
26
comment What are bidding sequences in which the responder is likely to be the “captain” of the partnership?
@TomAu: Nothing so subtle - just noting that disagreement on whether a call is game forcing or not happens even in world level play from time to time.
Apr
25
revised What are bidding sequences in which the responder is likely to be the “captain” of the partnership?
added 92 characters in body
Apr
25
answered What are bidding sequences in which the responder is likely to be the “captain” of the partnership?
Apr
23
revised How do you find not-quite-club level human opponents to regularly play bridge with?
added 581 characters in body