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I'm an EGF low dan, playing Go since late 2006. I was active in the community at Sensei's and the former SE-1.0 site shidogo.com, now switched my attention to BCG.SE

I'm involved in the English and German Go community in various way, most prominently I've created a platform for bad Go jokes.


20h
comment In Settlers of Catan, if you have unrevealed victory point cards that would make you win, are you forced to declare victory?
I'm a little confused how you arrived at the first quoted sentence (?). The rest of this answer is very logical.
Dec
6
comment Dan levels: difference between amateur and professional?
Hi EOL, have you had a look at boardgames.stackexchange.com/questions/5599 ? Does that link answer your question, or is it still unclear? If so, let us try and work out the differences, as right now this question looks like a dupe.
Nov
12
comment Do strong Go players play simuls, like in chess? Do they ever play blindfolded?
@OlivierDulac Ah okay, sorry. The amateur I was talking about was someone else, I think around 1 kyu, but I don't remember the name and failed to find the video either. When I heard of the game, at first I thought the player would be Pierre though, too, as he is quite famous. I've seen him play using this special board. He even devised a special coordinate system to make it easier to talk about the moves, if I recall correctly.
Nov
12
comment Do strong Go players play simuls, like in chess? Do they ever play blindfolded?
@OlivierDulac If you were referring to the Asian 6 dan, I just found that athos' answer contains his name (Bao Yun). He actually plays without any stones.
Nov
10
comment Go - How does one count territory in these two scenarios? (9x9)
It was not a stupid question, many people initially have trouble with scoring. You're right that the LR group of the first diagram is not alive (it is unsettled, the tsumego is a bit complicated as far as I can tell), but I think the asker was not referring to the L&D status of the groups rather, but to the general principle of scoring, as it seems they misunderstood how it is supposed to work. L&D is more advanced/complicated so I did not even consider it in my answer.
Oct
18
comment Go - How does one count territory in these two scenarios? (9x9)
Hi Rikku, welcome to this site! I've tried to answer your question, but if you feel like it, also check out playgo.to/iwtg/en, in particular their counting lessons. I learned Go using that tutorial, hope you find it helpful too :)
Oct
15
comment 4-4 high approach joseki question
@Tomas 1) Yep, black "5", fixed. 2) After b D18, white plays atari at D18, black connects at C17, then white F15. 3) Yes, white should capture. It would be really good for white. 4) :)
Oct
10
comment 4-4 high approach joseki question
Your C17 is probably better than the C18 I suggested, as it does not give black the option to E18 in sente.
Oct
6
comment How to apply the ko rule (Go)
If such a situation arises in your game it would be great if you could put in a photo of it. We could try and analyze it, and I think it might be easier than you expected. It feels (not sure) like you have wrongly interpreted how to treat that situation. Maybe not though, ko tends to be good for surprises :)
Oct
6
comment How to apply the ko rule (Go)
@adam.baker Yes, you are right. However, such a situation is really rare. If you have a situation with multiple ko at the same time, usually one player will simply close one of them and ignore the other (whatever gives him the best result globally). It is extremely unusual that all ko are connected and one player absolutely cannot give in. In such a situation, superko would apply, and you would have to keep track of the previous situations, or whatever your used rule book states (it's not something everyone agrees on...). Hope that clears it up a bit.
Oct
2
comment Translation Software
Hello @Leopold, welcome to this site. I'm afraid this is not the best place to ask this question as we probably don't have the required expertise to give you a really helpful answer.
Sep
8
comment Where can I find a good Joseki database?
The Gendai is one of many sources for both senseis/joseki and josekipedia, but I would be very surprised if anyone actually input all of Gendai's content into either database. Further, those databases contain (tons of) information from elsewhere. So they are certainly not equivalent, but rather supplementary.
Aug
7
comment What are good ways to learn to “read” a sequence of moves mentally?
I count tesuji problems to tsumego (I think tsumego translates to (generic) "go problems"), and yes, they are very useful. TimK mentioned Davies' Tesuji book, which I found terrific, particularly for beginners. I actually started learning about tesuji from that book. Some of them are also often seen in games, or (subtly) they are the reason a seemingly obvious move was not played, and it's fun to try and find them. -- I have few experience with Go apps, I only tried a few Android ones and found them so-so at best. I don't have an iOS device, but it's nice to hear there are good apps for that.
Jul
31
comment How can I quickly estimate my level in go by playing against a computer/tablet?
As it is now, it seems this question is too specific and will quickly get outdated. Would you mind rewriting it, for instance along the lines of "How can I quickly estimate my level in Go?", that would allow for more broadly helpful answers, and your particular examples may still be mentioned, possibly with a date or version.
Apr
22
comment Are there specific deck combinations to avoid in Smash Up?
I have protected this thread since it appears that several answers addressed a similar but not quite equivalent question, and that in turn may have caused others to misunderstand the question. Please feel free to have protection removed as deemed sufficient :)
Jan
29
comment Mahjong - declaring another player dead
Which ruleset are you using? Riichi?
Dec
21
comment At what level should one try to teach go?
Referring specifically to the goproblems.com issue: Indeed, sometimes we (as students) are presented wrong problems/solutions. I believe it is very important to challenge everything that looks suspicious, in a constructive manner: First try to find a counter claim yourself, and try to refute it - if you cannot refute it, ask a stronger player. Either he will explain something you missed in your reasoning, or he'll confirm that in fact the problem is flawed. This process is extremely important in actual games: You should challenge every move your opponent plays in the explained manner.
Dec
21
comment At what level should one try to teach go?
That's a strict view, and I think it has a very true core. However, and also for practical reasons (7 dans to teach dans for free are very limited in number, after all), I would add that a student can also learn a lot from simply listening to the teacher's reasoning. While the move may still be wrong, the student will gain some insight from learning a new perspective, if possible even those of several different teachers. However, the teacher has to be careful to clearly differentiate between (highest certaincy) facts and their personal opinions. Just this also enables same rank study sessions.
Nov
26
comment How can I quickly calculate the shanten number in Mahjong?
@PieterGeerkens Yes, I found a way that works somewhat nicely, luckily. I should have linked the questions. I'll leave this on here, however, because it would be awesome to also have some input from a veteran player's perspective - I have very few experience with mahjong as a player sadly.
Nov
26
comment How can I quickly calculate the shanten number in Mahjong?
The general idea is close to what I'm doing right now though.