3 Minor rewording
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The chances of each player getting exactly one card of a set, be that set {2H, 3H, 4H, 5H} or {6D, 6C, 6H, 6S} is the same. However, 6 was just an example; the chance of each player having a card with the same value but a different suit is actually bigger then the lowest four Hearts being distributed like that. So the starting position is actually in favour of four cards of the same value being played.

But players don't choose cards at random. First of all, they have to follow suit if possible, so for none of the players to be able to follow suit would mean that it's later in the game and the suit has been exhausted, or that the opening player has all cards of that suit.

And that's just following the rules. But there's strategy and tactics to consider as well. Unless a player is trying to shoot the moon, they will typically play the lowest Hearts possible. So a player may play a 4H or 5H, hoping that one of the others will have to play a 6H or 7H at least. A player following suit with a 5H on a 4H may hope for the same. If the other players don't want the trick, the only thing they can do is follow with the 2H and the 3H, sticking the trick on the player with 5H.

There is no strategic or tactical advantage to following value instead of suit, so it really comes down to coincidence — although I can imagine players following value just for fun, after the first two cards have been played.

The chances of each player getting exactly one card of a set, be that set {2H, 3H, 4H, 5H} or {6D, 6C, 6H, 6S} is the same. However, 6 was just an example; the chance of each player having a card with the same value but a different suit is actually bigger then the lowest four Hearts being distributed like that. So the starting position is actually in favour of four cards of the same value being played.

But players don't choose cards at random. First of all, they have to follow suit if possible, so for none of the players to be able to follow suit would mean that it's later in the game, or that the opening player has all cards of that suit.

And that's just following the rules. But there's strategy and tactics to consider as well. Unless a player is trying to shoot the moon, they will typically play the lowest Hearts possible. So a player may play a 4H or 5H, hoping that one of the others will have to play a 6H or 7H at least. A player following suit with a 5H on a 4H may hope for the same. If the other players don't want the trick, the only thing they can do is follow with the 2H and the 3H, sticking the trick on the player with 5H.

There is no strategic or tactical advantage to following value instead of suit, so it really comes down to coincidence — although I can imagine players following value just for fun, after the first two cards have been played.

The chances of each player getting exactly one card of a set, be that set {2H, 3H, 4H, 5H} or {6D, 6C, 6H, 6S} is the same. However, 6 was just an example; the chance of each player having a card with the same value but a different suit is actually bigger then the lowest four Hearts being distributed like that. So the starting position is in favour of four cards of the same value being played.

But players don't choose cards at random. First of all, they have to follow suit if possible, so for none of the players to be able to follow suit would mean that it's later in the game and the suit has been exhausted, or that the opening player has all cards of that suit.

And that's just following the rules. But there's strategy and tactics to consider as well. Unless a player is trying to shoot the moon, they will typically play the lowest Hearts possible. So a player may play a 4H or 5H, hoping that one of the others will have to play a 6H or 7H at least. A player following suit with a 5H on a 4H may hope for the same. If the other players don't want the trick, the only thing they can do is follow with the 2H and the 3H, sticking the trick on the player with 5H.

There is no strategic or tactical advantage to following value instead of suit, so it really comes down to coincidence — although I can imagine players following value just for fun, after the first two cards have been played.

2 Formatting
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The chances of each player getting exactly one card of a set, be that set {2H, 3H, 4H, 5H} or {6D, 6C, 6H, 6S} is the same. However, 6 was just an example; the chance of each player having a card with the same value but a different suit is actually bigger then the lowest four Hearts being distributed like that. So the starting position is actually in favour of four cards of the same value being played.

But players don't choose cards at random. First of all, they have to follow suit if possible, so for none of the players to be able to follow suit would mean that it's later in the game, or that the opening player has all cards of that suit.

And that's just following the rules. But there's strategy and tactics to consider as well. Unless a player is trying to shoot the moon, they will typically play the lowest Hearts possible. So a player may play a 4H or 5H, hoping that one of the others will have to play a 6H or 7H at least. A player following suit with a 5H on a 4H may hope for the same. If the other players don't want the trick, the only thing they can do is follow with the 2H and the 3H, sticking the trick on the player with 5H.
There

There is no strategic or tactical advantage to following value instead of suit, so it really comes down to coincidence — although I can imagine players following value just for fun, after the first two cards have been played.

The chances of each player getting exactly one card of a set, be that set {2H, 3H, 4H, 5H} or {6D, 6C, 6H, 6S} is the same. However, 6 was just an example; the chance of each player having a card with the same value but a different suit is actually bigger then the lowest four Hearts being distributed like that. So the starting position is actually in favour of four cards of the same value being played.

But players don't choose cards at random. First of all, they have to follow suit if possible, so for none of the players to be able to follow suit would mean that it's later in the game, or that the opening player has all cards of that suit.

And that's just following the rules. But there's strategy and tactics to consider as well. Unless a player is trying to shoot the moon, they will typically play the lowest Hearts possible. So a player may play a 4H or 5H, hoping that one of the others will have to play a 6H or 7H at least. A player following suit with a 5H on a 4H may hope for the same. If the other players don't want the trick, the only thing they can do is follow with the 2H and the 3H, sticking the trick on the player with 5H.
There is no strategic or tactical advantage to following value instead of suit, so it really comes down to coincidence — although I can imagine players following value just for fun, after the first two cards have been played.

The chances of each player getting exactly one card of a set, be that set {2H, 3H, 4H, 5H} or {6D, 6C, 6H, 6S} is the same. However, 6 was just an example; the chance of each player having a card with the same value but a different suit is actually bigger then the lowest four Hearts being distributed like that. So the starting position is actually in favour of four cards of the same value being played.

But players don't choose cards at random. First of all, they have to follow suit if possible, so for none of the players to be able to follow suit would mean that it's later in the game, or that the opening player has all cards of that suit.

And that's just following the rules. But there's strategy and tactics to consider as well. Unless a player is trying to shoot the moon, they will typically play the lowest Hearts possible. So a player may play a 4H or 5H, hoping that one of the others will have to play a 6H or 7H at least. A player following suit with a 5H on a 4H may hope for the same. If the other players don't want the trick, the only thing they can do is follow with the 2H and the 3H, sticking the trick on the player with 5H.

There is no strategic or tactical advantage to following value instead of suit, so it really comes down to coincidence — although I can imagine players following value just for fun, after the first two cards have been played.

1
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The chances of each player getting exactly one card of a set, be that set {2H, 3H, 4H, 5H} or {6D, 6C, 6H, 6S} is the same. However, 6 was just an example; the chance of each player having a card with the same value but a different suit is actually bigger then the lowest four Hearts being distributed like that. So the starting position is actually in favour of four cards of the same value being played.

But players don't choose cards at random. First of all, they have to follow suit if possible, so for none of the players to be able to follow suit would mean that it's later in the game, or that the opening player has all cards of that suit.

And that's just following the rules. But there's strategy and tactics to consider as well. Unless a player is trying to shoot the moon, they will typically play the lowest Hearts possible. So a player may play a 4H or 5H, hoping that one of the others will have to play a 6H or 7H at least. A player following suit with a 5H on a 4H may hope for the same. If the other players don't want the trick, the only thing they can do is follow with the 2H and the 3H, sticking the trick on the player with 5H.
There is no strategic or tactical advantage to following value instead of suit, so it really comes down to coincidence — although I can imagine players following value just for fun, after the first two cards have been played.