3 added 160 characters in body
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The reason that rule 601.2g exists is for payments with multiple parts. Take for example Birthing Pod, it has a payment that includes mana, tapping the pod, and sacrificing a Creature. 601.2g says you can pay the costs in any order, so you can tap the pod first, sacrifice creatures second and pay mana last. Or what ever order you want to, I cannot think of an example of a time when the exact order matters.

For something like Teysa all of the creatures get sacrificed at the same time because they arethere is only one direction to sacrifice the samecreatures. So in this case there is only one cost, to pay sacrificing creatures (the fact there is more than one creature doesn't matter). This means that if any of the sacrificed creatures has an ability that triggers off of any of the creatures dying or getting sacrificed they would trigger.

If they weren't all sacrificed at the same time it would indeed matter what order that they were sacrificed in since if the first on sacrificed has the trigger that cares about the other creatures dying it will not be on the battlefield when those creatures die and thus would not trigger.

The reason that rule 601.2g exists is for payments with multiple parts. Take for example Birthing Pod, it has a payment that includes mana, tapping the pod, and sacrificing a Creature. 601.2g says you can pay the costs in any order, so you can tap the pod first, sacrifice creatures second and pay mana last. Or what ever order you want to, I cannot think of an example of a time when the exact order matters.

For something like Teysa all of the creatures get sacrificed at the same time because they are the same cost. This means that if any of the sacrificed creatures has an ability that triggers off of any of the creatures dying or getting sacrificed they would trigger.

If they weren't all sacrificed at the same time it would indeed matter what order that they were sacrificed in since if the first on sacrificed has the trigger that cares about the other creatures dying it will not be on the battlefield when those creatures die and thus would not trigger.

The reason that rule 601.2g exists is for payments with multiple parts. Take for example Birthing Pod, it has a payment that includes mana, tapping the pod, and sacrificing a Creature. 601.2g says you can pay the costs in any order, so you can tap the pod first, sacrifice creatures second and pay mana last. Or what ever order you want to, I cannot think of an example of a time when the exact order matters.

For something like Teysa all of the creatures get sacrificed at the same time because there is only one direction to sacrifice the creatures. So in this case there is only one cost, to pay sacrificing creatures (the fact there is more than one creature doesn't matter). This means that if any of the sacrificed creatures has an ability that triggers off of any of the creatures dying or getting sacrificed they would trigger.

If they weren't all sacrificed at the same time it would indeed matter what order that they were sacrificed in since if the first on sacrificed has the trigger that cares about the other creatures dying it will not be on the battlefield when those creatures die and thus would not trigger.

2 deleted 268 characters in body
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The reason that rule 601.2g exists is for payments with multiple parts. Take for example Birthing Pod, it has a payment that includes mana, tapping the pod, and sacrificing a Creature. 601.2g says you can pay the costs in any order, so you can tap the pod first, sacrifice creatures second and pay mana last. Most of the time theOr what ever order you pay costs in doesn't matter but take the pod for example if the creature you are sacrificing is Birds of Paradise you can choose to pay the mana first and tap the Birdswant to pay for part of that, and then sacrifice it, whereas if you did it in the opposite order the Birds wouldn't be thereI cannot think of an example of a time when you need to pay mana for the abilityexact order matters.

For something like Teysa all of the creatures get sacrificed at the same time because they are the same cost. This means that if any of the sacrificed creatures has an ability that triggers off of any of the creatures dying or getting sacrificed they would trigger.

If they weren't all sacrificed at the same time it would indeed matter what order that they were sacrificed in since if the first on sacrificed has the trigger that cares about the other creatures dying it will not be on the battlefield when those creatures die and thus would not trigger.

The reason that rule 601.2g exists is for payments with multiple parts. Take for example Birthing Pod, it has a payment that includes mana, tapping the pod, and sacrificing a Creature. 601.2g says you can pay the costs in any order, so you can tap the pod first, sacrifice creatures second and pay mana last. Most of the time the order you pay costs in doesn't matter but take the pod for example if the creature you are sacrificing is Birds of Paradise you can choose to pay the mana first and tap the Birds to pay for part of that, and then sacrifice it, whereas if you did it in the opposite order the Birds wouldn't be there when you need to pay mana for the ability.

For something like Teysa all of the creatures get sacrificed at the same time because they are the same cost. This means that if any of the sacrificed creatures has an ability that triggers off of any of the creatures dying or getting sacrificed they would trigger.

If they weren't all sacrificed at the same time it would indeed matter what order that they were sacrificed in since if the first on sacrificed has the trigger that cares about the other creatures dying it will not be on the battlefield when those creatures die and thus would not trigger.

The reason that rule 601.2g exists is for payments with multiple parts. Take for example Birthing Pod, it has a payment that includes mana, tapping the pod, and sacrificing a Creature. 601.2g says you can pay the costs in any order, so you can tap the pod first, sacrifice creatures second and pay mana last. Or what ever order you want to, I cannot think of an example of a time when the exact order matters.

For something like Teysa all of the creatures get sacrificed at the same time because they are the same cost. This means that if any of the sacrificed creatures has an ability that triggers off of any of the creatures dying or getting sacrificed they would trigger.

If they weren't all sacrificed at the same time it would indeed matter what order that they were sacrificed in since if the first on sacrificed has the trigger that cares about the other creatures dying it will not be on the battlefield when those creatures die and thus would not trigger.

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The reason that rule 601.2g exists is for payments with multiple parts. Take for example Birthing Pod, it has a payment that includes mana, tapping the pod, and sacrificing a Creature. 601.2g says you can pay the costs in any order, so you can tap the pod first, sacrifice creatures second and pay mana last. Most of the time the order you pay costs in doesn't matter but take the pod for example if the creature you are sacrificing is Birds of Paradise you can choose to pay the mana first and tap the Birds to pay for part of that, and then sacrifice it, whereas if you did it in the opposite order the Birds wouldn't be there when you need to pay mana for the ability.

For something like Teysa all of the creatures get sacrificed at the same time because they are the same cost. This means that if any of the sacrificed creatures has an ability that triggers off of any of the creatures dying or getting sacrificed they would trigger.

If they weren't all sacrificed at the same time it would indeed matter what order that they were sacrificed in since if the first on sacrificed has the trigger that cares about the other creatures dying it will not be on the battlefield when those creatures die and thus would not trigger.