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The barn invalidates this and allows you to be more reckless in the beginning to get a "point rush" until your farmers are eventually returned to you, freeing them up for other uses. Personally I'm not a fan of this feature; it places far totoo much emphasis on luck, and being the first to connect a barn is the most advantageous. This alters the beginning of the game where it's a race to farm and place a barn.

This is also something I'm not pleased with. I feel, over all, the Abbey & Mayor shifts the balance of the game to a far more aggressive posture, and this could be annoying to some as they will rarely be left alone and must respond to aggression aton every turn instead of trying to play their game.

I am extremely competitive but I feel the game already has a fantastic balance with other expansions (Inns & Cathedrals, Builders & Traders) and this expansion just tips it a bit too far. My friends like this and as such I playplay this expansion very often.

The landscape tiles now include Inns, which, if the road gets completed, let you score 2two points for each tile instead of one. This is a nice feature as it adds more value to road tiles, and shifts some of the emphasis from city building to road building. These tiles come with the added risk of, if they're not completed, not receivereceiving any points for them. I think this is a nice feature in terms of risk/reward. It's very cool too, to watch others trying to join your long road withthat has an Inn for a share of the spoils!

Cathedrals applies the same concept to city building. The reward in this case is three points for each completed city tile, and no points for an incomplete city. This is fascinating because youyou can use cathedral tiles offensively to prevent opponents from earning points on their cities.

If you include Abbey & Mayor such strategies are somewhat mitigated since the Mayor will likely trump a large follower (the Mayor can only be used on a city tile). The Abbey, or "joker" card, will go some way to allow a player to complete their feature even if you strived to make this task difficult.

Introduces 24 more landscape tiles. 20Twenty trade good tokens (9 barrels, 6 grain, and 5 cloth). Six pig meeples, 6and six builder meeples.

The pig meeple is a great addition. It allows your to earn 1 additional point for every city connected to a farm. You must already have a farmer on the boardfarm in order to useplace the pig.

The builder meeple is a fantastic addition and changes the gameplay substantially. You can add your builder to any city or road with a follower. On your next turn, if you can add to theyour city or road, you get an extra turn immediately, for a maximum of two turns.

Whoever has the most of each token by the end of the game end earns 10 points for each type. If you have the most barrel and cloth tokens, you gain an additional 20 points to your total.

This adds an incentive to close your opponents cities if you deem it beneficial to you, or damaging to your most threatening opponents. Closing a city with trade goods could deny deny your opponents the points, or/and help you earn more points, or match their number of trade good tokens, thus invalidating their advantage. A lot of thought can be applied to how you manage this feature of the game.

The barn invalidates this and allows you to be more reckless in the beginning to get a "point rush" until your farmers are eventually returned to you, freeing them up for other uses. Personally I'm not a fan of this feature; it places far to much emphasis on luck, and being the first to connect a barn is the most advantageous. This alters the beginning of the game where it's a race to farm and place a barn.

This is also something I'm not pleased with. I feel, over all, the Abbey & Mayor shifts the balance of the game to a far more aggressive posture, and this could be annoying to some as they will rarely be left alone and must respond to aggression at every turn instead of trying to play their game.

I am extremely competitive but I feel the game already has a fantastic balance with other expansions (Inns & Cathedrals, Builders & Traders) and this expansion just tips it a bit too far. My friends like this and as such I play this expansion very often.

The landscape tiles now include Inns, which, if the road gets completed, let you score 2 points for each tile instead of one. This is a nice feature as it adds more value to road tiles, and shifts some of the emphasis from city building to road building. These tiles come with the added risk of, if they're not completed, not receive any points for them. I think this is a nice feature in terms of risk/reward. It's very cool too, to watch others trying to join your long road with an Inn for a share of the spoils!

Cathedrals applies the same concept to city building. The reward in this case is three points for each completed city tile, and no points for an incomplete city. This is fascinating because you can use cathedral tiles offensively to prevent opponents from earning points on their cities.

If you include Abbey & Mayor such strategies are somewhat mitigated since the Mayor will likely trump a large follower (the Mayor can only be used on a city tile). The Abbey, or "joker" card, will go some way to allow a player to complete their feature.

Introduces 24 more landscape tiles. 20 trade good tokens (9 barrels, 6 grain, and 5 cloth). Six pig meeples, 6 builder meeples.

The pig meeple is a great addition. It allows your to earn 1 additional point for every city connected to a farm. You must already have a farmer on the board in order to use the pig.

The builder meeple is a fantastic addition and changes the gameplay substantially. You can add your builder to any city or road with a follower. On your next turn, if you can add to the city or road, you get an extra turn immediately, for a maximum of two turns.

Whoever has the most of each token by the end of the game earns 10 points for each type. If you have the most barrel and cloth tokens, you gain an additional 20 points to your total.

This adds an incentive to close your opponents cities if you deem it beneficial to you, or damaging to your most threatening opponents. Closing a city with trade goods could deny deny your opponents the points, or/and help you earn more points, or match their number of trade good tokens, thus invalidating their advantage. A lot of thought can be applied to how you manage this feature of the game.

The barn invalidates this and allows you to be more reckless in the beginning to get a "point rush" until your farmers are eventually returned to you, freeing them up for other uses. Personally I'm not a fan of this feature; it places far too much emphasis on luck, and being the first to connect a barn is the most advantageous. This alters the beginning of the game where it's a race to farm and place a barn.

This is also something I'm not pleased with. I feel, over all, the Abbey & Mayor shifts the balance of the game to a far more aggressive posture, and this could be annoying to some as they will rarely be left alone and must respond to aggression on every turn instead of trying to play their game.

I am extremely competitive but I feel the game already has a fantastic balance with other expansions (Inns & Cathedrals, Builders & Traders) and this expansion just tips it a bit too far. My friends like this and as such I play this expansion very often.

The landscape tiles now include Inns, which, if the road gets completed, let you score two points for each tile instead of one. This is a nice feature as it adds more value to road tiles, and shifts some of the emphasis from city building to road building. These tiles come with the added risk of, if they're not completed, not receiving any points for them. I think this is a nice feature in terms of risk/reward. It's very cool to watch others trying to join your long road that has an Inn for a share of the spoils!

Cathedrals applies the same concept to city building. The reward in this case is three points for each completed city tile, and no points for an incomplete city. This is fascinating because you can use cathedral tiles offensively to prevent opponents from earning points on their cities.

If you include Abbey & Mayor such strategies are somewhat mitigated since the Mayor will likely trump a large follower (the Mayor can only be used on a city tile). The Abbey, or "joker" card, will go some way to allow a player to complete their feature even if you strived to make this task difficult.

Introduces 24 more landscape tiles. Twenty trade good tokens (9 barrels, 6 grain, and 5 cloth). Six pig meeples, and six builder meeples.

The pig meeple is a great addition. It allows your to earn 1 additional point for every city connected to a farm. You must already have a farmer on the farm in order to place the pig.

The builder meeple is a fantastic addition and changes the gameplay substantially. You can add your builder to any city or road with a follower. On your next turn, if you can add to your city or road, you get an extra turn immediately for a maximum of two turns.

Whoever has the most of each token by game end earns 10 points for each type. If you have the most barrel and cloth tokens you gain an additional 20 points to your total.

This adds an incentive to close your opponents cities if you deem it beneficial to you, or damaging to your most threatening opponents. Closing a city with trade goods could deny your opponents points, or/and help you earn more points, or match their number of trade good tokens, thus invalidating their advantage. A lot of thought can be applied to how you manage this feature of the game.

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Introduces 6 "joker" abbey tiles. Six Mayor meeples, one for each player. Twelve new landscape tiles. Six wagon peicespieces, one for each player. And six barns, one for each player.

Wagons allow you to move from a road to an open city tile, if you complete the road. This allows you to claim something new without using an extra turn.

The Mayor meeple can only be used on a city tile, and will couldcounts for onean extra manfollower for every shield found on a city tile.

The six abbeyAbbey tiles allow you to fill a gap between a cross of tiles. It has to be surrounded from top, bottom, left, and right (diagonal is not necessary).

I think Abbey & Mayor has the most impact of all the expansion packs.

One of challenges of Carcassone was farming. Farming was a critical component to winning. But committing too many farmers, and getting into a farm war-war early on, was quite expensive. You would lose many of your meeples until game end, which prevents you from using them at a critical junction later in the game. Striking the right balance between farming and other objectives was critical.

The barn invalidates this and allows you to be more reckless in the beginning to get a "point rush" until your farmers are eventually returned to you, freeing them up for other uses. Personally I'm not a fan of this feature; it places far to much emphasis on luck, and being the first to connect a barbarn is the most advantageous. Others people areThis alters the beginning of the game where it's a race to farm and I have played this expansion very oftenplace a barn.  

The Mayor meeple changes game fundamentals too. For every shield the Mayor meeple counts as an extra manfollower. This does make for interesting cut-throat game playgameplay. The game becomes far more aggressive where everyone is actively trying to steal others' cities.

This is also something I'm not pleased with. I feel, over all, the Abbey & Mayor shifts the balance of the game to a far more aggressive typeposture, and this could be annoying to some as they will notrarely be left alone and must respond to aggression at every turn instead of trying to play their game.

Finally, the "joker" card, or Abbey tile, I feel is a cheap "get out of jail" card for the player, and invalidates some of your strategy if you like blocking your opponents while you work on your own objectives.

I am extremely competitive but I feel the game already has a fantastic balance with other expansions (Inns & Cathedrals, Builders & Traders) and this expansion just tips it a bit too far. My friends like this and as such I play this expansion very often. 

Introduces 18 new landscape tiles, and six large followers. The new tiles include two special cathedral tiles.

The landscape tiles now include innsInns, which, if the road gets completed, let you score 2 points for each tile instead of one. This is a nice feature as it adds more value to road tiles, and shifts some of the emphasis from city tiles a bitbuilding to road building. These tiles come with the added risk of, if they're not completed, you do not receive any points for them. I think this addsis a nice feature in terms of risk/reward. It's very cool too, to watch others trying to join to ayour long road that has an inn on it with a follower,an Inn for a share of the spoils, or without a follower, for all the points.!

Cathedrals takes thisapplies the same concept and applies it to city building. The reward in this case is three points for each completed city tile, and noneno points for nan incomplete city. This is fascinating because you can use thosecathedral tiles offensively or to gain points. You could, in an attempt to sabotage yourprevent opponents cities or roads, use the Cathedrals or Inn tiles in a way that prevents or makes it difficult for your opponent to completefrom earning points on their featurescities.

The large followfollower, which counts for two followers, is also intriguing since it presents you with a chance to steel all the points and muscle in onsteal your opponents points by taking over their cities, farms, or roads. You now have an incentive to be aggressive where, whereas in the past itoriginal Carcassone such insidious plotting required more careful planning and an extra turn to place two followers.

Both of those features are trumped byIf you include Abbey & Mayor such strategies are somewhat mitigated since the Mayor will likely out-trump thetrump a large follow, and thefollower (the Mayor can only be used on a city tile). The Abbey, or "joker" card, will go some way to lettingallow a playplayer to complete their feature.

The pig meeple is a great addition. It allows your to earn 1 additional point for every city connected to a farm. In order to use the pig, youYou must already have a farmer already, and you must have the most farmers on a farmthe board in order to use the pig.

The builder meeple is a fantastic addition and does changechanges the game-playgameplay substantially. You can add your builder to any city or road with a follower. On your next turn, if you can join add to the city or road, you get an extra turn immediately, for a maximum of two turns.

This is great because it adds an element of risk that plays into the largest part of the expansion: The trade goods. Each of the new added tiles have anhas an icon ofdenoting a trade good on them. The personplayer who closes a city, irrespective of the owner, gets to keep as manywhatever trade goods asgood tokens are denoted on the city tiles contained. If you close a city with two tiles that have barrels on them, for example, you get two barrel tokens. This becomesis exciting sincebecause having a builder on a city gives you an extra turn that increases the chance that you could complete your chances of completing your city and wingaining the tokens. Who ever

Whoever has the most of each token by the end of the game earns 10 points for each type. So ifIf you have the most barrelsbarrel and most clothscloth tokens, you get 20gain an additional 20 points to your total.

This adds thean incentive to close your opponents cities. If if you perceive that an opponent is not a threat and is aboutdeem it beneficial to completeyou, or damaging to your most threatening opponents. Closing a city with trade-good tokens, you goods could close it and earndeny deny your opponents the tokens. This will eitherpoints, or/and help you earn more points at game end, deny your opponent the points, or match their number of trade good tokens, thus invalidating their advantage. A lot of thought can be applied to how you manage this feature of the game.

I haven't played any of the othersother expansions, but I know of Tower, River II, Count, King & Cult, Princess & Dragon, Wheel of Fortune. I will give Tower a try tomorrowthis week and update my answer.

That said, of all of those I think the Count sounds most fascinating and will updatelikely change gameplay drastically. It includes a separate set of pre-numbered tiles that must be assembled to create a castle. Your followers presence in the answercastle now and other events that take place on this castle now influence gameplay and scoring.

Introduces 6 "joker" abbey tiles. Six Mayor meeples, one for each player. Twelve new landscape tiles. Six wagon peices, one for each player. And six barns, one for each player.

Wagons allow you to move from a road to an open city tile, if you complete the road. This allows you to claim something new without using an extra turn.

The Mayor meeple can only be used on a city tile, and will could for one extra man for every shield found on a city tile.

The six abbey tiles allow you to fill a gap between a cross of tiles. It has to be surrounded from top, bottom, left, and right (diagonal is not necessary).

I think Abbey & Mayor has the most impact.

One of challenges of Carcassone was farming. Farming was critical component to winning. But committing too many farmers, and getting into a farm war early on, was quite expensive. You would lose many of your meeples which prevents you from using them at a critical junction in the game. Striking the right balance between farming and other objectives was critical.

The barn invalidates this and allows you to be more reckless in the beginning to get a "point rush" until your farmers are eventually returned to you, freeing them up for other uses. Personally I'm not a fan of this feature; it places far to much emphasis on luck, and being the first to connect a bar. Others people are and I have played this expansion very often.  

The Mayor meeple changes game fundamentals too. For every shield the Mayor meeple counts as an extra man. This does make for interesting cut-throat game play. The game becomes far more aggressive where everyone is actively trying to steal others' cities.

This is also something I'm not pleased with. I feel, over all, the Abbey & Mayor shifts the balance of the game to a far more aggressive type, and this could be annoying to some as they will not be left alone and must respond to aggression at every turn instead of trying to play their game.

Finally, the "joker" card I feel is a cheap "get out of jail" card for the player, and invalidates some of your strategy if you like blocking your opponents while you work on your own objectives.

I am extremely competitive but I feel the game already has a fantastic balance with other expansions (Inns & Cathedrals, Builders & Traders) and this expansion just tips it a bit too far.

Introduces 18 new landscape tiles, and six large followers.

The landscape tiles now include inns, which, if the road gets completed, let you score 2 points for each tile instead of one. This is a nice feature as it adds more value to road tiles, and shifts the emphasis from city tiles a bit. These tiles come with the added risk of, if they're not completed, you do not receive any points for them. I think this adds a nice feature in terms of risk/reward. It's very cool too, to watch others trying to join to a long road that has an inn on it with a follower, for a share of the spoils, or without a follower, for all the points.

Cathedrals takes this same concept and applies it to city building. The reward in this case is three points for each city tile, and none for n incomplete city. This is fascinating because you can use those tiles offensively or to gain points. You could, in an attempt to sabotage your opponents cities or roads, use the Cathedrals or Inn tiles in a way that prevents or makes it difficult for your opponent to complete their features.

The large follow, which counts for two followers, is also intriguing since it presents you with a chance to steel all the points and muscle in on your opponents cities, farms, or roads. You now have an incentive to be aggressive where in the past it required more careful planning and an extra turn to place two followers.

Both of those features are trumped by Abbey & Mayor since the Mayor will likely out-trump the large follow, and the Abbey, or "joker" card will go some way to letting a play complete their feature.

The pig meeple is a great addition. It allows your to earn 1 additional point for every city connected to a farm. In order to use the pig, you must have a farmer already, and you must have the most farmers on a farm.

The builder meeple is a fantastic addition and does change the game-play substantially. You can add your builder to any city with a follower. On your next turn, if you can join add to the city, you get an extra turn, for a maximum of two turns.

This is great because it adds an element of risk that plays into the largest part of the expansion: The trade goods. Each of the new added tiles have an an icon of a trade good on them. The person who closes a city, irrespective of the owner, gets to keep as many trade goods as the city tiles contained. If you close a city with two tiles that have barrels on them, for example, you get two barrel tokens. This becomes exciting since having a builder on a city gives you an extra turn that increases the chance that you could complete your city and win the tokens. Who ever has the most of each token by the end of the game earns 10 points for each type. So if you have the most barrels and most cloths tokens, you get 20 additional points.

This adds the incentive to close your opponents cities. If you perceive that an opponent is not a threat and is about to complete a city with trade-good tokens, you could close it and earn the tokens. This will either help you earn more points at game end, deny your opponent the points, or match their number of trade good tokens, thus invalidating their advantage.

I haven't played any of the others, but I will give Tower a try tomorrow and I will update the answer.

Introduces 6 "joker" abbey tiles. Six Mayor meeples, one for each player. Twelve new landscape tiles. Six wagon pieces, one for each player. And six barns, one for each player.

Wagons allow you to move from a road to an open city tile if you complete the road. This allows you to claim something new without using an extra turn.

The Mayor meeple can only be used on a city tile, and counts for an extra follower for every shield found on a city tile.

The six Abbey tiles allow you to fill a gap between a cross of tiles. It has to be surrounded from top, bottom, left, and right (diagonal is not necessary).

I think Abbey & Mayor has the most impact of all the expansion packs.

One of challenges of Carcassone was farming. Farming was a critical component to winning. But committing too many farmers, and getting into a farm-war early on, was quite expensive. You would lose many of your meeples until game end, which prevents you from using them at a critical junction later in the game. Striking the right balance between farming and other objectives was critical.

The barn invalidates this and allows you to be more reckless in the beginning to get a "point rush" until your farmers are eventually returned to you, freeing them up for other uses. Personally I'm not a fan of this feature; it places far to much emphasis on luck, and being the first to connect a barn is the most advantageous. This alters the beginning of the game where it's a race to farm and place a barn.

The Mayor meeple changes game fundamentals too. For every shield the Mayor meeple counts as an extra follower. This does make for interesting cut-throat gameplay. The game becomes far more aggressive where everyone is actively trying to steal others' cities.

This is also something I'm not pleased with. I feel, over all, the Abbey & Mayor shifts the balance of the game to a far more aggressive posture, and this could be annoying to some as they will rarely be left alone and must respond to aggression at every turn instead of trying to play their game.

Finally, the "joker" card, or Abbey tile, I feel is a cheap "get out of jail" card for the player, and invalidates some of your strategy if you like blocking your opponents while you work on your own objectives.

I am extremely competitive but I feel the game already has a fantastic balance with other expansions (Inns & Cathedrals, Builders & Traders) and this expansion just tips it a bit too far. My friends like this and as such I play this expansion very often. 

Introduces 18 new landscape tiles, and six large followers. The new tiles include two special cathedral tiles.

The landscape tiles now include Inns, which, if the road gets completed, let you score 2 points for each tile instead of one. This is a nice feature as it adds more value to road tiles, and shifts some of the emphasis from city building to road building. These tiles come with the added risk of, if they're not completed, not receive any points for them. I think this is a nice feature in terms of risk/reward. It's very cool too, to watch others trying to join your long road with an Inn for a share of the spoils!

Cathedrals applies the same concept to city building. The reward in this case is three points for each completed city tile, and no points for an incomplete city. This is fascinating because you can use cathedral tiles offensively to prevent opponents from earning points on their cities.

The large follower, which counts for two followers, is also intriguing since it presents you with a chance to steal your opponents points by taking over their cities, farms, or roads. You now have an incentive to be aggressive, whereas in the original Carcassone such insidious plotting required more careful planning and an extra turn to place two followers.

If you include Abbey & Mayor such strategies are somewhat mitigated since the Mayor will likely trump a large follower (the Mayor can only be used on a city tile). The Abbey, or "joker" card, will go some way to allow a player to complete their feature.

The pig meeple is a great addition. It allows your to earn 1 additional point for every city connected to a farm. You must already have a farmer on the board in order to use the pig.

The builder meeple is a fantastic addition and changes the gameplay substantially. You can add your builder to any city or road with a follower. On your next turn, if you can add to the city or road, you get an extra turn immediately, for a maximum of two turns.

This is great because it adds an element of risk that plays into the largest part of the expansion: The trade goods. Each of the new added tiles has an icon denoting a trade good. The player who closes a city, irrespective of the owner, gets to keep whatever trade good tokens are denoted on the city tiles. If you close a city with two tiles that have barrels on them, for example, you get two barrel tokens. This is exciting because having a builder on a city gives you an extra turn that increases your chances of completing your city and gaining the tokens.

Whoever has the most of each token by the end of the game earns 10 points for each type. If you have the most barrel and cloth tokens, you gain an additional 20 points to your total.

This adds an incentive to close your opponents cities if you deem it beneficial to you, or damaging to your most threatening opponents. Closing a city with trade goods could deny deny your opponents the points, or/and help you earn more points, or match their number of trade good tokens, thus invalidating their advantage. A lot of thought can be applied to how you manage this feature of the game.

I haven't played any of the other expansions, but I know of Tower, River II, Count, King & Cult, Princess & Dragon, Wheel of Fortune. I will give Tower a try this week and update my answer.

That said, of all of those I think the Count sounds most fascinating and will likely change gameplay drastically. It includes a separate set of pre-numbered tiles that must be assembled to create a castle. Your followers presence in the castle now and other events that take place on this castle now influence gameplay and scoring.

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Of all the expansion packs, I think Abbey &Abbey & Mayor

Introduces 6 "joker" abbey tiles. Six Mayor has the most impactmeeples, one for each player. It introducesTwelve new landscape tiles. Six wagon peices, one for each player. And six barns which, one for each player.

Wagons allow you to clear out farmersmove from a road to an open city tile, if you complete the road. They will score normallyThis allows you to claim something new without using an extra turn.

The Mayor meeple can only be used on a city tile, basedand will could for one extra man for every shield found on regular game rulesa city tile.

The six abbey tiles allow you to fill a gap between a cross of tiles. It has to be surrounded from top, however theybottom, left, and right (diagonal is not necessary).

The barns allow you claim a farm on any corner where 4 green fields connect. Any farmers present on the farms at this point will get returned to their owners, and normal scoring rules will apply. The barn will remain until the end of the game, however, and score 4 points for each completed city at game end.

I think Abbey & Mayor has the most impact. 

One of challenges of the original Carcassone was farming. Farming was critical component to winning you the game, under most circumstances, but. But committing too many farmers, and getting into a farm war early on, was quite expensive (you. You would lose many of your meeples), even though it could pay off which prevents you from using them at a critical junction in the game.

  Striking the right balance between farmersfarming and other objectives was critical. 

The barn invalidates this and allows you to be more reckless in the beginning to get a "point rush" until your farmers are eventually returned to you, freeing them up for other uses. Personally I'm not a fan of this feature; but othersit places far to much emphasis on luck, and being the first to connect a bar. Others people are and I have played this expansion very often.

The Mayor meeple also changes game fundamentals with respect to shields found on city tilestoo. For every shield the Mayor meeple counts as an extra man. The default value of the piece is 1, but it goes up by one for every shield. This does make for interesting cut-throat game play and makes it a much. The game becomes far more aggressive game where everyone is actively trying to steal others' cities.

This is also something I'm not pleased with. I feel, over all, the Abbey and& Mayor shifts the balance of the game to a far more aggressive approachtype, and this could be annoying to some as they will not be left alone and must respond to aggression at every turn instead of trying to play their game.

The absolutely must have expansion in my opinion is Traders & BuildersInns & Cathedrals

Introduces 18 new landscape tiles, and six large followers. 

The incentive to complete other people's cities changes game fundamentals. It also makeslandscape tiles now include inns, which, if the road gets completed, let you score 2 points for interesting scenarios when more than two players are involvedeach tile instead of one. The decision to completeThis is a nice feature as it adds more value to road tiles, and shifts the emphasis from city tiles a bit. These tiles come with the added risk of, if they're not completed, you do not receive any points for resources willthem. I think this adds a nice feature in terms of risk/reward. It's very much dependcool too, to watch others trying to join to a long road that has an inn on who the ownerit with a follower, for a share of the spoils, or without a follower, for all the points.

Cathedrals takes this same concept and applies it to city building. The reward in this case is three points for each city tile, and their relative level of threatnone for n incomplete city. I think thisThis is by farfascinating because you can use those tiles offensively or to gain points. You could, in an attempt to sabotage your opponents cities or roads, use the best expansion I have played and it's well worthCathedrals or Inn tiles in a way that prevents or makes it difficult for your opponent to complete their features.

The other expansion I have played is Inns & Cathedralslarge follow, which adds another layer of intrigue. As the previous person mentionedcounts for two followers, is also intriguing since it makes for interesting game play aspresents you can take overwith a chance to steel all the points and muscle in on your opponents cities, farms, or roads. This is different fromYou now have an incentive to be aggressive where in the Mayor version becausepast it gives the opponent a chance to respondrequired more careful planning and an extra turn to the aggressionplace two followers. Whereas

Both of those features are trumped by Abbey & Mayor since the Mayor will likely out-trump the large follow, ifand the Abbey, or "joker" card will go some way to letting a play complete their feature.

Traders & Builders

Introduces 24 more landscape tiles. 20 trade good tokens (9 barrels, 6 grain, and 5 cloth). Six pig meeples, 6 builder meeples.

The pig meeple is a great addition. It allows your to earn 1 additional point for every city is being invaded byconnected to a Mayorfarm. In order to use the pig, you're only hopeyou must have a farmer already, and you must have the most farmers on a farm.

The builder meeple is a fantastic addition and does change the game-play substantially. You can add your builder to haveany city with a Mayorfollower. On your next turn, if you can join it (sinceadd to the Mayor counts for one point forcity, you get an extra manturn, for every shield)a maximum of two turns.

This is great because it adds an element of risk that plays into the largest part of the expansion: The ideatrade goods. Each of also sabotagingthe new added tiles have an an icon of a largetrade good on them. The person who closes a city is, irrespective of the owner, gets to keep as many trade goods as the city tiles contained. If you close a great strategycity with two tiles that have barrels on them, for example, you get two barrel tokens. To buildThis becomes exciting since having a builder on a city gives you an extra turn that increases the chance that you could complete your owncity and gain a lotwin the tokens. Who ever has the most of each token by the end of the game earns 10 points for each type. So if you have the most barrels and most cloths tokens, you get 20 additional points.

This adds the incentive to close your opponents cities. If you perceive that an opponent is not a threat and is about to complete a city with trade-good tokens, you could close it and earn the tokens. This will either help you earn more points at game end, deny your opponent the points, or match their number of trade good tokens, thus invalidating their advantage.

I haven't played any of the others, but I will give Tower a try tomorrow and sabotage you're opponent's cityI will update the answer.

Of all the expansion packs, I think Abbey & Mayor has the most impact. It introduces barns which allow you to clear out farmers. They will score normally, based on regular game rules, however they get returned to their owners. The barn will remain until the end of the game and score 4 points for each completed city. One of challenges of the original Carcassone was farming. Farming was critical to winning you the game, under most circumstances, but committing too many farmers, and getting into a farm war early on, was quite expensive (you would lose your meeples), even though it could pay off.

  Striking the right balance between farmers and other objectives was critical. The barn invalidates this and allows you to be more reckless in the beginning to get a "point rush" until your farmers are eventually returned to you. Personally I'm not a fan of this feature; but others are and I have played this expansion very often.

The Mayor meeple also changes game fundamentals with respect to shields found on city tiles. For every shield the Mayor meeple counts as an extra man. The default value of the piece is 1, but it goes up by one for every shield. This does make for interesting cut-throat game play and makes it a much more aggressive game where everyone is trying to steal others' cities.

This is also something I'm not pleased with. I feel, over all, the Abbey and Mayor shifts the balance of the game to a far more aggressive approach, and this could be annoying to some as they will not be left alone and must respond to aggression at every turn instead of trying to play their game.

The absolutely must have expansion in my opinion is Traders & Builders. The incentive to complete other people's cities changes game fundamentals. It also makes for interesting scenarios when more than two players are involved. The decision to complete a city for resources will very much depend on who the owner of the city is and their relative level of threat. I think this is by far the best expansion I have played and it's well worth it.

The other expansion I have played is Inns & Cathedrals which adds another layer of intrigue. As the previous person mentioned, it makes for interesting game play as you can take over your opponents cities. This is different from the Mayor version because it gives the opponent a chance to respond to the aggression. Whereas the Mayor, if your city is being invaded by a Mayor, you're only hope is to have a Mayor join it (since the Mayor counts for one point for an extra man for every shield). The idea of also sabotaging a large city is a great strategy. To build your own and gain a lot of points, or try and sabotage you're opponent's city.

Abbey & Mayor

Introduces 6 "joker" abbey tiles. Six Mayor meeples, one for each player. Twelve new landscape tiles. Six wagon peices, one for each player. And six barns, one for each player.

Wagons allow you to move from a road to an open city tile, if you complete the road. This allows you to claim something new without using an extra turn.

The Mayor meeple can only be used on a city tile, and will could for one extra man for every shield found on a city tile.

The six abbey tiles allow you to fill a gap between a cross of tiles. It has to be surrounded from top, bottom, left, and right (diagonal is not necessary).

The barns allow you claim a farm on any corner where 4 green fields connect. Any farmers present on the farms at this point will get returned to their owners, and normal scoring rules will apply. The barn will remain, however, and score 4 points for each city at game end.

I think Abbey & Mayor has the most impact. 

One of challenges of Carcassone was farming. Farming was critical component to winning. But committing too many farmers, and getting into a farm war early on, was quite expensive. You would lose many of your meeples which prevents you from using them at a critical junction in the game. Striking the right balance between farming and other objectives was critical. 

The barn invalidates this and allows you to be more reckless in the beginning to get a "point rush" until your farmers are eventually returned to you, freeing them up for other uses. Personally I'm not a fan of this feature; it places far to much emphasis on luck, and being the first to connect a bar. Others people are and I have played this expansion very often.

The Mayor meeple changes game fundamentals too. For every shield the Mayor meeple counts as an extra man. This does make for interesting cut-throat game play. The game becomes far more aggressive where everyone is actively trying to steal others' cities.

This is also something I'm not pleased with. I feel, over all, the Abbey & Mayor shifts the balance of the game to a far more aggressive type, and this could be annoying to some as they will not be left alone and must respond to aggression at every turn instead of trying to play their game.

Inns & Cathedrals

Introduces 18 new landscape tiles, and six large followers. 

The landscape tiles now include inns, which, if the road gets completed, let you score 2 points for each tile instead of one. This is a nice feature as it adds more value to road tiles, and shifts the emphasis from city tiles a bit. These tiles come with the added risk of, if they're not completed, you do not receive any points for them. I think this adds a nice feature in terms of risk/reward. It's very cool too, to watch others trying to join to a long road that has an inn on it with a follower, for a share of the spoils, or without a follower, for all the points.

Cathedrals takes this same concept and applies it to city building. The reward in this case is three points for each city tile, and none for n incomplete city. This is fascinating because you can use those tiles offensively or to gain points. You could, in an attempt to sabotage your opponents cities or roads, use the Cathedrals or Inn tiles in a way that prevents or makes it difficult for your opponent to complete their features.

The large follow, which counts for two followers, is also intriguing since it presents you with a chance to steel all the points and muscle in on your opponents cities, farms, or roads. You now have an incentive to be aggressive where in the past it required more careful planning and an extra turn to place two followers.

Both of those features are trumped by Abbey & Mayor since the Mayor will likely out-trump the large follow, and the Abbey, or "joker" card will go some way to letting a play complete their feature.

Traders & Builders

Introduces 24 more landscape tiles. 20 trade good tokens (9 barrels, 6 grain, and 5 cloth). Six pig meeples, 6 builder meeples.

The pig meeple is a great addition. It allows your to earn 1 additional point for every city connected to a farm. In order to use the pig, you must have a farmer already, and you must have the most farmers on a farm.

The builder meeple is a fantastic addition and does change the game-play substantially. You can add your builder to any city with a follower. On your next turn, if you can join add to the city, you get an extra turn, for a maximum of two turns.

This is great because it adds an element of risk that plays into the largest part of the expansion: The trade goods. Each of the new added tiles have an an icon of a trade good on them. The person who closes a city, irrespective of the owner, gets to keep as many trade goods as the city tiles contained. If you close a city with two tiles that have barrels on them, for example, you get two barrel tokens. This becomes exciting since having a builder on a city gives you an extra turn that increases the chance that you could complete your city and win the tokens. Who ever has the most of each token by the end of the game earns 10 points for each type. So if you have the most barrels and most cloths tokens, you get 20 additional points.

This adds the incentive to close your opponents cities. If you perceive that an opponent is not a threat and is about to complete a city with trade-good tokens, you could close it and earn the tokens. This will either help you earn more points at game end, deny your opponent the points, or match their number of trade good tokens, thus invalidating their advantage.

I haven't played any of the others, but I will give Tower a try tomorrow and I will update the answer.

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