Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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The main thrust behind the precision 1C is that it keeps the rest of the one level open for descriptive bids. Their argument is that the standard bids with jumpused to show strength (jump raises and so forth) take up too much room in the bidding, room that could be used by you and your partner to hone in on exact strength, distribution, etc. The downside to this is that it keeps that low level open to your opponents, and many strong players will do whatever they can to take that bidding room that the Precision system would otherwise use.

I did once play a weak NT system (outside of Precision), and I thought it worked very well. You really didn't need to worry about having suits covered. Even if you were left in 1NT and your opponents could run a suit before you could get a word in, you could usually still find 7 tricks, or at worst go down one. Plus, your partner knows exactly what you have when you bid 1NT, and will take you out if he has a oddly shaped hand that will not play well in NT. It also acts as a pre=empt for opposing bidding. A good number of players have no real idea how to overcall weak NT openings, and you've taken away the entire one level, so they would have to start on the two level to try and find a fit, and may end up too high too soon.

The main thrust behind the precision 1C is that it keeps the rest of the one level open for descriptive bids. Their argument is that standard bids with jump raises and so forth take up too much room in the bidding, room that could be used by you and your partner to hone in on exact strength, distribution, etc. The downside to this is that it keeps that low level open to your opponents, and many strong players will do whatever they can to take that bidding room that the Precision system would otherwise use.

I did once play a weak NT system (outside of Precision), and I thought it worked very well. You really didn't need to worry about having suits covered. Even if you were left in 1NT and your opponents could run a suit before you could get a word in, you could usually still find 7 tricks, or at worst go down one. Plus, your partner knows exactly what you have when you bid 1NT, and will take you out if he has a oddly shaped hand that will not play well in NT. It also acts as a pre=empt for opposing bidding. A good number of players have no real idea how to overcall weak NT openings, and you've taken away the entire one level, so they would have to start on the two level to try and find a fit, and may end up too high too soon.

The main thrust behind the precision 1C is that it keeps the rest of the one level open for descriptive bids. Their argument is that the standard bids used to show strength (jump raises and so forth) take up too much room in the bidding, room that could be used by you and your partner to hone in on exact strength, distribution, etc. The downside to this is that it keeps that low level open to your opponents, and many strong players will do whatever they can to take that bidding room that the Precision system would otherwise use.

I did once play a weak NT system (outside of Precision), and I thought it worked very well. You really didn't need to worry about having suits covered. Even if you were left in 1NT and your opponents could run a suit before you could get a word in, you could usually still find 7 tricks, or at worst go down one. Plus, your partner knows exactly what you have when you bid 1NT, and will take you out if he has a oddly shaped hand that will not play well in NT. It also acts as a pre=empt for opposing bidding. A good number of players have no real idea how to overcall weak NT openings, and you've taken away the entire one level, so they would have to start on the two level to try and find a fit, and may end up too high too soon.

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The main thrust behind the precision 1C is that it keeps the rest of the one level open for descriptive bids. Their argument is that standard bids with jump raises and so forth take up too much room in the bidding, room that could be used by you and your partner to hone in on exact strength, distribution, etc. The downside to this is that it keeps that low level open to your opponents, and many strong players will do whatever they can to take that bidding room that the Precision system would otherwise use.

I did once play a weak NT system (outside of Precision), and I thought it worked very well. You really didn't need to worry about having suits covered. Even if you were left in 1NT and your opponents could run a suit before you could get a word in, you could usually still find 7 tricks, or at worst go down one. Plus, your partner knows exactly what you have when you bid 1NT, and will take you out if he has a oddly shaped hand that will not play well in NT. It also acts as a pre=empt for opposing bidding. A good number of players have no real idea how to overcall weak NT openings, and you've taken away the entire one level, so they would have to start on the two level to try and find a fit, and may end up too high too soon.

The main thrust behind the precision 1C is that it keeps the rest of the one level open for descriptive bids. Their argument is that standard bids with jump raises and so forth take up too much room in the bidding, room that could be used by you and your partner to hone in on exact strength, distribution, etc. The downside to this is that it keeps that low level open to your opponents, and many strong players will do whatever they can to take that bidding room that the Precision system would otherwise use.

I did once play a weak NT system (outside of Precision), and I thought it worked very well. You really didn't need to worry about having suits covered. Even if you were left in 1NT and your opponents could run a suit before you could get a word in, you could usually still find 7 tricks, or at worst go down one. Plus, your partner knows exactly what you have when you bid 1NT, and will take you out if has a oddly shaped hand that will not play well in NT. It also acts as a pre=empt for opposing bidding. A good number of players have no real idea how to overcall weak NT openings, and you've taken away the entire one level, so they would have to start on the two level to try and find a fit, and may end up too high too soon.

The main thrust behind the precision 1C is that it keeps the rest of the one level open for descriptive bids. Their argument is that standard bids with jump raises and so forth take up too much room in the bidding, room that could be used by you and your partner to hone in on exact strength, distribution, etc. The downside to this is that it keeps that low level open to your opponents, and many strong players will do whatever they can to take that bidding room that the Precision system would otherwise use.

I did once play a weak NT system (outside of Precision), and I thought it worked very well. You really didn't need to worry about having suits covered. Even if you were left in 1NT and your opponents could run a suit before you could get a word in, you could usually still find 7 tricks, or at worst go down one. Plus, your partner knows exactly what you have when you bid 1NT, and will take you out if he has a oddly shaped hand that will not play well in NT. It also acts as a pre=empt for opposing bidding. A good number of players have no real idea how to overcall weak NT openings, and you've taken away the entire one level, so they would have to start on the two level to try and find a fit, and may end up too high too soon.

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The main thrust behind the precision 1C is that it keeps the rest of the one level open for descriptive bids. Their argument is that standard bids with jump raises and so forth take up too much room in the bidding, room that could be used by you and your partner to hone in on exact strength, distribution, etc. The downside to this is that it keeps that low level open to your opponents, and many strong players will do whatever they can to take that bidding room that the Precision system would otherwise use.

I did once play a weak NT system (outside of Precision), and I thought it worked very well. You really didn't need to worry about having suits covered. Even if you were left in 1NT and your opponents could run a suit before you could get a word in, you could usually still find 7 tricks, or at worst go down one. Plus, your partner knows exactly what you have when you bid 1NT, and will take you out if has a oddly shaped hand that will not play well in NT. It also acts as a pre=empt for opposing bidding. A good number of players have no real idea how to overcall weak NT openings, and you've taken away the entire one level, so they would have to start on the two level to try and find a fit, and may end up too high too soon.