6 remove arguments that come with attitude; please find a better way to present them if you wish to include them
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Suppose the players are Anne, Bill, Charlize, David, Elizabeth, and Fred.

Anne rolls the dice, moves her counter and lands on Fred's property. Fred fails to notice.

The players following Anne are Bill, Charlize, David, etc. Bill is the first player following Anne, and Charlize is the second. So Fred must notice and request rent before Charlize rolls.

A specific scenario:

The first following player, Bill, now rolls the dice and moves his counter. Any transactions are processed as necessary.

The second following player, Charlize, now reaches for the dice as Fred notices Anne's counter and request payment. As the second following player, Charlize, has not yet thrown the dice, the request by Fred is in order and must be honoured.

There is absolutely no interpretation of English that would make Bill the second following player to Anne when the players are taking turns in the order:

  • Anne
  • Bill
  • Charlize
  • David
  • Elizabeth
  • Fred
 

The question is now asked: "why the second following instead of first following player?"

Simply, to prevent a pair of players from sitting down and guaranteeing that the one in elder position wins. Under a "first following" rule, if Alfred and Betty sit down beside each other, with Alfred rolling first, then Betty simply must be very fast at rolling the dice to ensure that Alfred never pay rent.

Next game, Alfred and Betty switch places and Betty is guaranteed to never pay rent.

And so on. This is called "The Bum's Rush".

There are also more subtle ways to play it, where the younger hand rolls very quickly only at strategic moments in the game. Same effect, with only a very slight reduction in effectiveness.


OP would like a reference - I submit The English language:

Following:

preposition

  1. coming after or as a result of.

adjective

  1. next in time

Second:

number

  1. constituting number two in a sequence; coming after the first in time or order; 2nd.
  2. subordinate or inferior in position, rank, or importance.

Given the player sequence above, when it is Anne's turn the sequence of players, in order, taking their turns following Anne, is:

  • Bill;
  • Charlize;
  • David;
  • Elizabeth;
  • Frederick.

Clearly the first following player to (ie that player which first comes after or as a result of) Anne is Bill.

Then the second following to (ie that player which constitutes number two in the sequence, or comes after the first following player) Anne is Charlize.

My justification for referencing the English language: That is the language in which the rules are written.

Anne rolls the dice, moves her counter and lands on Fred's property. Fred fails to notice.

The first following player, Bill, now rolls the dice and moves his counter. Any transactions are processed as necessary.

The second following player, Charlize, now reaches for the dice as Fred notices Anne's counter and request payment. As the second following player, Charlize, has not yet thrown the dice, the request by Fred is in order and must be honoured.

There is absolutely no interpretation of English that would make Bill the second following player to Anne when the players are taking turns in the order:

  • Anne
  • Bill
  • Charlize
  • David
  • Elizabeth
  • Fred

The question is now asked: "why the second following instead of first following player?"

Simply, to prevent a pair of players from sitting down and guaranteeing that the one in elder position wins. Under a "first following" rule, if Alfred and Betty sit down beside each other, with Alfred rolling first, then Betty simply must be very fast at rolling the dice to ensure that Alfred never pay rent.

Next game, Alfred and Betty switch places and Betty is guaranteed to never pay rent.

And so on. This is called "The Bum's Rush".

There are also more subtle ways to play it, where the younger hand rolls very quickly only at strategic moments in the game. Same effect, with only a very slight reduction in effectiveness.


OP would like a reference - I submit The English language:

Following:

preposition

  1. coming after or as a result of.

adjective

  1. next in time

Second:

number

  1. constituting number two in a sequence; coming after the first in time or order; 2nd.
  2. subordinate or inferior in position, rank, or importance.

Given the player sequence above, when it is Anne's turn the sequence of players, in order, taking their turns following Anne, is:

  • Bill;
  • Charlize;
  • David;
  • Elizabeth;
  • Frederick.

Clearly the first following player to (ie that player which first comes after or as a result of) Anne is Bill.

Then the second following to (ie that player which constitutes number two in the sequence, or comes after the first following player) Anne is Charlize.

My justification for referencing the English language: That is the language in which the rules are written.

Suppose the players are Anne, Bill, Charlize, David, Elizabeth, and Fred.

Anne rolls the dice, moves her counter and lands on Fred's property. Fred fails to notice.

The players following Anne are Bill, Charlize, David, etc. Bill is the first player following Anne, and Charlize is the second. So Fred must notice and request rent before Charlize rolls.

A specific scenario:

The first following player, Bill, now rolls the dice and moves his counter. Any transactions are processed as necessary.

The second following player, Charlize, now reaches for the dice as Fred notices Anne's counter and request payment. As the second following player, Charlize, has not yet thrown the dice, the request by Fred is in order and must be honoured.

 

The question is now asked: "why the second following instead of first following player?"

Simply, to prevent a pair of players from sitting down and guaranteeing that the one in elder position wins. Under a "first following" rule, if Alfred and Betty sit down beside each other, with Alfred rolling first, then Betty simply must be very fast at rolling the dice to ensure that Alfred never pay rent.

Next game, Alfred and Betty switch places and Betty is guaranteed to never pay rent.

And so on. This is called "The Bum's Rush".

There are also more subtle ways to play it, where the younger hand rolls very quickly only at strategic moments in the game. Same effect, with only a very slight reduction in effectiveness.

5 added 114 characters in body
source | link

Anne rolls the dice, moves her counter and lands on Fred's property. Fred fails to notice.

The first following player, Bill, now rolls the dice and moves his counter. Any transactions are processed as necessary.

The second following player, Charlize, now reaches for the dice as Fred notices Anne's counter and request payment. As the second following player, Charlize, has not yet thrown the dice, the request by Fred is in order and must be honoured.

There is absolutely no interpretation of English that would make Bill the second following player to Anne when the players are taking turns in the order:

  • Anne
  • Bill
  • Charlize
  • David
  • Elizabeth
  • Fred

The question is now asked: "why the second following instead of first following player?"

Simply, to prevent a pair of players from sitting down and guaranteeing that the one in elder position wins. Under a "first following" rule, if Alfred and Betty sit down beside each other, with Alfred rolling first, then Betty simply must be very fast at rolling the dice to ensure that Alfred never pay rent.

Next game, Alfred and Betty switch places and Betty is guaranteed to never pay rent.

And so on. This is called "The Bum's Rush".

There are also more subtle ways to play it, where the younger hand rolls very quickly only at strategic moments in the game. Same effect, with only a very slight reduction in effectiveness.


OP would like a reference - I submit The English language:

Following:

preposition

  1. coming after or as a result of.

adjective

  1. next in time

Second:

number

  1. constituting number two in a sequence; coming after the first in time or order; 2nd.
  2. subordinate or inferior in position, rank, or importance.

Given the player sequence above, when it is Anne's turn the sequence of players, in order, taking their turns following Anne, is:

  • Bill;
  • Charlize;
  • David;
  • Elizabeth;
  • Frederick.

Clearly the first following player to (ie that player which first comes after or as a result of) to Anne is Bill.

Then the second following to (ie that player which constitutes number two in the sequence, or comes after the first following player) to Anne is Charlize.

My justification for referencing the English language: That is the language in which the rules are written.

Anne rolls the dice, moves her counter and lands on Fred's property. Fred fails to notice.

The first following player, Bill, now rolls the dice and moves his counter. Any transactions are processed as necessary.

The second following player, Charlize, now reaches for the dice as Fred notices Anne's counter and request payment. As the second following player, Charlize, has not yet thrown the dice, the request by Fred is in order and must be honoured.

There is absolutely no interpretation of English that would make Bill the second following player to Anne when the players are taking turns in the order:

  • Anne
  • Bill
  • Charlize
  • David
  • Elizabeth
  • Fred

The question is now asked: "why the second following instead of first following player?"

Simply, to prevent a pair of players from sitting down and guaranteeing that the one in elder position wins. Under a "first following" rule, if Alfred and Betty sit down beside each other, with Alfred rolling first, then Betty simply must be very fast at rolling the dice to ensure that Alfred never pay rent.

Next game, Alfred and Betty switch places and Betty is guaranteed to never pay rent.

And so on. This is called "The Bum's Rush".

There are also more subtle ways to play it, where the younger hand rolls very quickly only at strategic moments in the game. Same effect, with only a very slight reduction in effectiveness.


OP would like a reference - I submit The English language:

Following:

preposition

  1. coming after or as a result of.

adjective

  1. next in time

Second:

number

  1. constituting number two in a sequence; coming after the first in time or order; 2nd.
  2. subordinate or inferior in position, rank, or importance.

Given the player sequence above, when it is Anne's turn the sequence of players, in order, taking their turns following Anne, is:

  • Bill;
  • Charlize;
  • David;
  • Elizabeth;
  • Frederick.

Clearly the first following player (ie that player which first comes after or as a result of) to Anne is Bill.

Then the second following (ie that player which constitutes number two in the sequence, or comes after the first following player) to Anne is Charlize.

Anne rolls the dice, moves her counter and lands on Fred's property. Fred fails to notice.

The first following player, Bill, now rolls the dice and moves his counter. Any transactions are processed as necessary.

The second following player, Charlize, now reaches for the dice as Fred notices Anne's counter and request payment. As the second following player, Charlize, has not yet thrown the dice, the request by Fred is in order and must be honoured.

There is absolutely no interpretation of English that would make Bill the second following player to Anne when the players are taking turns in the order:

  • Anne
  • Bill
  • Charlize
  • David
  • Elizabeth
  • Fred

The question is now asked: "why the second following instead of first following player?"

Simply, to prevent a pair of players from sitting down and guaranteeing that the one in elder position wins. Under a "first following" rule, if Alfred and Betty sit down beside each other, with Alfred rolling first, then Betty simply must be very fast at rolling the dice to ensure that Alfred never pay rent.

Next game, Alfred and Betty switch places and Betty is guaranteed to never pay rent.

And so on. This is called "The Bum's Rush".

There are also more subtle ways to play it, where the younger hand rolls very quickly only at strategic moments in the game. Same effect, with only a very slight reduction in effectiveness.


OP would like a reference - I submit The English language:

Following:

preposition

  1. coming after or as a result of.

adjective

  1. next in time

Second:

number

  1. constituting number two in a sequence; coming after the first in time or order; 2nd.
  2. subordinate or inferior in position, rank, or importance.

Given the player sequence above, when it is Anne's turn the sequence of players, in order, taking their turns following Anne, is:

  • Bill;
  • Charlize;
  • David;
  • Elizabeth;
  • Frederick.

Clearly the first following player to (ie that player which first comes after or as a result of) Anne is Bill.

Then the second following to (ie that player which constitutes number two in the sequence, or comes after the first following player) Anne is Charlize.

My justification for referencing the English language: That is the language in which the rules are written.

4 added 1465 characters in body
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Anne rolls the dice, moves her counter and lands on Fred's property. Fred fails to notice.

The first following player, Bill, now rolls the dice and moves his counter. Any transactions are processed as necessary.

The second following player, Charlize, now reaches for the dice as Fred notices Anne's counter and request payment. As the second following player, Charlize, has not yet thrown the dice, the request by Fred is in order and must be honoured.

There is absolutely no interpretation of English that would make Bill the second following player to Anne when the players are taking turns in the order:

  • Anne
  • Bill
  • Charlize
  • David
  • Elizabeth
  • Fred

The question is now asked: "why the second following instead of first following player?"

Simply, to prevent a pair of players from sitting down and guaranteeing that the one in elder position wins. Under a "first following" rule, if Alfred and Betty sit down beside each other, with Alfred rolling first, then Betty simply must be very fast at rolling the dice to ensure that Alfred never pay rent.

Next game, Alfred and Betty switch places and Betty is guaranteed to never pay rent.

And so on. This is called "The Bum's Rush".

There are also more subtle ways to play it, where the younger hand rolls very quickly only at strategic moments in the game. Same effect, with only a very slight reduction in effectiveness.


OP would like a reference - I submit The English language:

Following:

preposition

  1. coming after or as a result of.

adjective

  1. next in time

Second:

number

  1. constituting number two in a sequence; coming after the first in time or order; 2nd.
  2. subordinate or inferior in position, rank, or importance.

Given the player sequence above, when it is Anne's turn the sequence of players, in order, taking their turns following Anne, is:

  • Bill;
  • Charlize;
  • David;
  • Elizabeth;
  • Frederick.

Clearly the first following player (ie that player which first comes after or as a result of) to Anne is Bill.

Then the second following (ie that player which constitutes number two in the sequence, or comes after the first following player) to Anne is Charlize.

Anne rolls the dice, moves her counter and lands on Fred's property. Fred fails to notice.

The first following player, Bill, now rolls the dice and moves his counter. Any transactions are processed as necessary.

The second following player, Charlize, now reaches for the dice as Fred notices Anne's counter and request payment. As the second following player, Charlize, has not yet thrown the dice, the request by Fred is in order and must be honoured.

There is absolutely no interpretation of English that would make Bill the second following player to Anne when the players are taking turns in the order:

  • Anne
  • Bill
  • Charlize
  • David
  • Elizabeth
  • Fred

The question is now asked: "why the second following instead of first following player?"

Simply, to prevent a pair of players from sitting down and guaranteeing that the one in elder position wins. Under a "first following" rule, if Alfred and Betty sit down beside each other, with Alfred rolling first, then Betty simply must be very fast at rolling the dice to ensure that Alfred never pay rent.

Next game, Alfred and Betty switch places and Betty is guaranteed to never pay rent.

And so on. This is called "The Bum's Rush".

There are also more subtle ways to play it, where the younger hand rolls very quickly only at strategic moments in the game. Same effect, with only a very slight reduction in effectiveness.

Anne rolls the dice, moves her counter and lands on Fred's property. Fred fails to notice.

The first following player, Bill, now rolls the dice and moves his counter. Any transactions are processed as necessary.

The second following player, Charlize, now reaches for the dice as Fred notices Anne's counter and request payment. As the second following player, Charlize, has not yet thrown the dice, the request by Fred is in order and must be honoured.

There is absolutely no interpretation of English that would make Bill the second following player to Anne when the players are taking turns in the order:

  • Anne
  • Bill
  • Charlize
  • David
  • Elizabeth
  • Fred

The question is now asked: "why the second following instead of first following player?"

Simply, to prevent a pair of players from sitting down and guaranteeing that the one in elder position wins. Under a "first following" rule, if Alfred and Betty sit down beside each other, with Alfred rolling first, then Betty simply must be very fast at rolling the dice to ensure that Alfred never pay rent.

Next game, Alfred and Betty switch places and Betty is guaranteed to never pay rent.

And so on. This is called "The Bum's Rush".

There are also more subtle ways to play it, where the younger hand rolls very quickly only at strategic moments in the game. Same effect, with only a very slight reduction in effectiveness.


OP would like a reference - I submit The English language:

Following:

preposition

  1. coming after or as a result of.

adjective

  1. next in time

Second:

number

  1. constituting number two in a sequence; coming after the first in time or order; 2nd.
  2. subordinate or inferior in position, rank, or importance.

Given the player sequence above, when it is Anne's turn the sequence of players, in order, taking their turns following Anne, is:

  • Bill;
  • Charlize;
  • David;
  • Elizabeth;
  • Frederick.

Clearly the first following player (ie that player which first comes after or as a result of) to Anne is Bill.

Then the second following (ie that player which constitutes number two in the sequence, or comes after the first following player) to Anne is Charlize.

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