2 Cleaned up some grammar
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I am very much a begginer (around 17K currently), but I have benefitted from several teaching games, so after reading maftructs answer written by someone who clearly has experience teaching I thought it might be beneficial to highlight what I find most helpful in people playing teaching games with me.

  1. Playing them on a computer is very useful for a teaching game. It will let you go back and forth to different points in the game to explore variations. While you can certainly do this with a hand written kifu (or simply through memory for a strong player with a good memory), being able to go back and see how the board was exactly at that point is extremely helpful for weaker players with bad memories.
  2. It clearly depends on the teacher and student, but in contrast to mafutrct, I have always finished every teaching game. I do not resign even after clearly hopeless. Finishing the game provides more fodder for the review and more opportunities to see the patterns in the mid and end games that are not only from a stronger player, but a stronger player focused on highlighting what I need to see. I always resign when hopeless against a peer or in a non-teaching game where I got a handicap, but I find it helpful to finish games that are focused on teaching.
  3. While I have certainly gotten good advice and had significant things highlighted during the game, I prefer for most discussion after the game. During the game, I am focused on playing. Once I make a move, good or bad, I am focused on how the other player will respond and my next move. Highlighting something then disrupts that thought and makes me go back. Unless you intend for me to actually take back the move (or end the game there and begin the review) I prefer to discuss it afterwards.

As I started withsaid, I am very much a beggingbegginer and can only offer my thoughts from the studentsstudent's side, so take everything with a grain a of salt and feel free to tell me if I am wrong. But I thought it would be useful bookend to the answers from strong players who are doing teaching.

I am very much a begginer (around 17K currently), but I have benefitted from several teaching games, so after reading maftructs answer written by someone who clearly has experience teaching I thought it might be beneficial to highlight what I find most helpful in people playing teaching games with me.

  1. Playing them on a computer is very useful for a teaching game. It will let you go back and forth to different points in the game to explore variations. While you can certainly do this with a hand written kifu (or simply through memory for a strong player with a good memory), being able to go back and see how the board was exactly at that point is extremely helpful for weaker players with bad memories.
  2. It clearly depends on the teacher and student, but in contrast to mafutrct, I have always finished every teaching game. I do not resign even after clearly hopeless. Finishing the game provides more fodder for the review and more opportunities to see the patterns in the mid and end games that are not only from a stronger player, but a stronger player focused on highlighting what I need to see. I always resign when hopeless against a peer or in a non-teaching game where I got a handicap, but I find it helpful to finish games that are focused on teaching.
  3. While I have certainly gotten good advice and had significant things highlighted during the game, I prefer for most discussion after the game. During the game, I am focused on playing. Once I make a move, good or bad, I am focused on how the other player will respond and my next move. Highlighting something then disrupts that thought and makes me go back. Unless you intend for me to actually take back the move (or end the game there and begin the review) I prefer to discuss it afterwards.

As I started with, I am very much a begging and can only offer my thoughts from the students side, so take everything with a grain a of salt and feel free to tell me if I am wrong. But I thought it would be useful bookend to the answers from strong players who are doing teaching.

I am very much a begginer (around 17K currently), but I have benefitted from several teaching games, so after reading maftructs answer written by someone who clearly has experience teaching I thought it might be beneficial to highlight what I find most helpful in people playing teaching games with me.

  1. Playing them on a computer is very useful for a teaching game. It will let you go back and forth to different points in the game to explore variations. While you can certainly do this with a hand written kifu (or simply through memory for a strong player with a good memory), being able to go back and see how the board was exactly at that point is extremely helpful for weaker players with bad memories.
  2. It clearly depends on the teacher and student, but in contrast to mafutrct, I have always finished every teaching game. I do not resign even after clearly hopeless. Finishing the game provides more fodder for the review and more opportunities to see the patterns in the mid and end games that are not only from a stronger player, but a stronger player focused on highlighting what I need to see. I always resign when hopeless against a peer or in a non-teaching game where I got a handicap, but I find it helpful to finish games that are focused on teaching.
  3. While I have certainly gotten good advice and had significant things highlighted during the game, I prefer for most discussion after the game. During the game, I am focused on playing. Once I make a move, good or bad, I am focused on how the other player will respond and my next move. Highlighting something then disrupts that thought and makes me go back. Unless you intend for me to actually take back the move (or end the game there and begin the review) I prefer to discuss it afterwards.

As I said, I am very much a begginer and can only offer my thoughts from the student's side, so take everything with a grain a of salt and feel free to tell me if I am wrong. But I thought it would be useful bookend to the answers from strong players who are doing teaching.

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source | link

I am very much a begginer (around 17K currently), but I have benefitted from several teaching games, so after reading maftructs answer written by someone who clearly has experience teaching I thought it might be beneficial to highlight what I find most helpful in people playing teaching games with me.

  1. Playing them on a computer is very useful for a teaching game. It will let you go back and forth to different points in the game to explore variations. While you can certainly do this with a hand written kifu (or simply through memory for a strong player with a good memory), being able to go back and see how the board was exactly at that point is extremely helpful for weaker players with bad memories.
  2. It clearly depends on the teacher and student, but in contrast to mafutrct, I have always finished every teaching game. I do not resign even after clearly hopeless. Finishing the game provides more fodder for the review and more opportunities to see the patterns in the mid and end games that are not only from a stronger player, but a stronger player focused on highlighting what I need to see. I always resign when hopeless against a peer or in a non-teaching game where I got a handicap, but I find it helpful to finish games that are focused on teaching.
  3. While I have certainly gotten good advice and had significant things highlighted during the game, I prefer for most discussion after the game. During the game, I am focused on playing. Once I make a move, good or bad, I am focused on how the other player will respond and my next move. Highlighting something then disrupts that thought and makes me go back. Unless you intend for me to actually take back the move (or end the game there and begin the review) I prefer to discuss it afterwards.

As I started with, I am very much a begging and can only offer my thoughts from the students side, so take everything with a grain a of salt and feel free to tell me if I am wrong. But I thought it would be useful bookend to the answers from strong players who are doing teaching.