Is there a reason for why were the five colors of MTG ordered, clockwise, white, blue, black, red and green?

The colors adjacent to each other on the pentagon are "allied" and often have similar, complementary abilities. For example, Blue has a relatively large number of flying creatures, as do White and Black, which are next to it. The two non-adjacent colors to a particular color are "enemy" colors, and are thematically opposed. For instance, Red tends to be very aggressive, while White and Blue are often more defensive in nature.

I don't think that white is on the top has a reason though.

  • I guess that the creator summarized the mood for each color and placed them on a pentagram. And he made it right, because they never changed it. – 0 kelvin Nov 25 '14 at 22:38
  • @0kelvin Yes, pretty much: markrosewater.tumblr.com/post/77670999325/… He certainly had a philosophy in mind for all of them, even if it wasn't completely explicit, and things matured from there. – Cascabel Nov 26 '14 at 1:20
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    @0kelvin They can not change it anymore, because all cards must have identical backs. That's why the "Magic The Gathering" still has a ™ symbol even though it is a ®egistered trademark by now and why it still reads "DECKMASTER" even though that product series doesn't exist anymore. – Philipp Nov 26 '14 at 12:01
  • In MTGO they can, because there is no paper there. – 0 kelvin Nov 26 '14 at 13:48
  • @Philipp Well, he also made it right in the sense that they didn't really have to drastically shift the identities of any of the colors, so the order makes sense still (in terms of ally/enemy colors), and so there wasn't a real reason to change it even if the card backs weren't an issue. – Cascabel Nov 26 '14 at 23:31

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