6

Anthony casts Searing Blood, targeting Nathan's Elvish Mystic.

Nathan casts and resolves Dromoka's Command, choosing to 1) prevent all damage that would be dealt by Searing Blood this turn and 2) put a +1/+1 counter on Elvish Mystic.

Searing Blood resolves, deals no damage, and goes to the graveyard.

Anthony casts and resolves Lightning Bolt to kill Elvish Mystic.

Searing Blood triggers from the graveyard, because Elvish Mystic died. Does the prevention effect created by Dromoka's command still apply to it after it changes zones? In other words, will Searing Blood deal 3 damage to Nathan?

  • 1
    Part of the confusion is perhaps the mis-statement 'Searing Blood triggers from the graveyard.' It would be 'The delayed triggered ability created by the resolution of Searing Blood triggers.' – Affe Apr 9 '15 at 18:48
8

The damage is prevented.

An reference by an object to its own name is a reference to itself. So "Searing Blood deals 3 damage" has the object on the stack deal three damage. That's the very same object that was targeted by Dromoka's Command.

The object no longer exists when you are instructed to have it deal 3 damage, but that's fine. It can still deal damage. Last Known Information about the object is used if required.

201.4. Text that refers to the object it’s on by name means just that particular object and not any other objects with that name, regardless of any name changes caused by game effects.

400.7. An object that moves from one zone to another becomes a new object with no memory of, or relation to, its previous existence. There are seven exceptions to this rule: [none of which are pertinent]

112.7a Once activated or triggered, an ability exists on the stack independently of its source. Destruction or removal of the source after that time won’t affect the ability. Note that some abilities cause a source to do something (for example, “Prodigal Pyromancer deals 1 damage to target creature or player”) rather than the ability doing anything directly. In these cases, any activated or triggered ability that references information about the source because the effect needs to be divided checks that information when the ability is put onto the stack. Otherwise, it will check that information when it resolves. In both instances, if the source is no longer in the zone it’s expected to be in at that time, its last known information is used. The source can still perform the action even though it no longer exists.

This scenario occurs more often for creatures with abilities. Take a Prodigal Sorcerer that was killed before its ability resolved, for example. It's the object on the battlefield that's doing the damage, even though it no longer exists. It's the color of the object on the battlefield that's consulted if the target has any Protection from Red, not the color of the object in the graveyard.

2

The damage will still be prevented.

This is because Searing Blood sets up a delayed trigger, and the source of the delayed trigger is the spell that created it. We know that Searing Blood is dealing the damage since it says "Searing Blood deals 3 damage to the creature's controller."

Since we know that Searing Blood is dealing the damage, and it is the same Searing Blood that was targeted by the Command the damage will be prevented since the Command prevents all of the damage dealt by its target.

603.7d If a spell creates a delayed triggered ability, the source of that delayed triggered ability is that spell. The controller of that delayed triggered ability is the player who controlled that spell as it resolved.

201.4. Text that refers to the object it’s on by name means just that particular object and not any other objects with that name, regardless of any name changes caused by game effects.

Also note that the Searing Blood doesn't trigger from the graveyard, this is relevant in cases where the card gets removed from the graveyard before the ability triggers.

  • 1
    @ikegami I don't understand your comment. The source is exactly what matters since the Command prevents all damage from a single source. – diego Apr 9 '15 at 16:30
  • 1
    The Command simply cares about the source of the damage. The ability says who deals the damage ("Searing Blood deals ..."). 603.7d identifies the source of the ability, but nothing's checking the source of the ability. For example, if the Command had targeted an instant that says "Each of your creatures deals 1 damage to target opponent", the Command would not prevent any damage. – ikegami Apr 9 '15 at 16:37
  • @ikegami Ok, I understand what you are saying now. Though I disagree that the rule I stated isn't relevant, it is just needed in conjunction with the ones you cited. – diego Apr 9 '15 at 16:41

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