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The rules say that special effects are resolved starting with the current player and in turn clockwise. Can I resolve all of my multiple special effects when it is my turn, or do I only resolve 1, then give the next player a chance to, etc. Also, if I know a player after me has 2 effects, can I wait until he does both and then resolve mine (essentially passing then choosing to resolve)?

Edit: here are snippets of the rules:

When a base has been chosen to score, each player first gets to use any Special abilities that happen “before” the base scores.

I've come to notice the distinction between "special abilities" such as certain actions and minions that can come into play as a base passes its breaking point (but isn't considered having been "scored"). The rules below apply to these cards:

If more than one player wants to use a Special ability, start with the current player and go around the table clockwise until all players pass in sequence (if you pass and another player uses a Special, you can then still choose to use a Special of your own). If your Special allows you to play extra cards, you must play those immediately or not at all.

There are then effects having to do with cards already in play that occur "after" the base scores, as described shortly after:

After scoring, players can use Special abilities that happen “after” a base scores.

After noting this, I'd like to clarify my question to specifically refer to these separate sets of phases, "before" and "after", and ask what people feel is the ruling on whether, starting with the player whose turn it is, they can play more than one card (or in the case of "after the base scores", resolve more than one card's "after the base scores" effect), or whether they must pick one at a time and wait until everyone else has had a chance to do so or pass before taking the second opportunity.

I lean toward one at a time if for no other reason than it seems like an interesting tactical consideration in itself.

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    I can only answer the second question: If you pass, and someone else plays a Special, then you get another change to play a Special. This is explicitly mentioned in the rules. If you pass and he doesn't play his second special, you're screwed though, so it's a gamble. – ikegami Jun 1 '15 at 2:03
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Can I resolve all of my multiple special effects when it is my turn, or do I only resolve 1, then give the next player a chance to, etc.

It depends on whether

start with the current player and go around the table clockwise until all players pass in sequence

means

Start with the current player. They may either play a card with a Special ability or pass. Go around the table clockwise until all players pass in sequence.

or

Start with the current player. They may either play cards with a Special ability or pass. Go around the table clockwise until all players pass in sequence.

There's no telling for sure without an official answer (which I can't find), but it seems more natural to me if the players only got to play one at a time.

You are definitely able to play more than one, but I believe you must give everyone else the chance to play one in between.


Also, if I know a player after me has 2 effects, can I wait until he does both and then resolve mine (essentially passing then choosing to resolve)?

You can, but it's a gamble. If you pass, and someone else plays a Special, then you get another change to play a Special. This is explicitly mentioned in the rules. However, if you pass and he decides to pass instead of playing his second special, you won't get to play anything else.

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(Note: I have no experience with Smash Up, so I'm only relying on my general experience with orders in rules)

What do the rules explicitly say? If the rules do not mention about in which order the effects should be resolved, then I would say "special effects" most likely means that all the special effects in the chain — whether it is a chain of only a single special effect, or a chain of more than one special effect — of a player are resolved before moving onto the next player. So for example (note that the rules most likely specify if the effects of a single player are resolved in a specific order or not):

The first player has two, the second one, and the third four special effects to resolve. For the sake of clarity, let's say the current player is the first player. Starting with the first player:

  1. The first player solves his first effect.
  2. The first player solves his second effect.
  3. All of the first player's special effects are now resolved, play moves onto the second player.
  4. The second player solves his first effect.
  5. All of the second player's special effects are now resolved, play moves onto the third player.
  6. The third player solves his first effect.
  7. The third player solves his second effect.
  8. The third player solves his third effect.
  9. The third player solves his fourth effect.
  10. All of the third player's special effects are now resolved.
  11. All of the players' special effects are now resolved, play continues normally.

If the rules state that the effects are resolved from the current player onwards, proceeding clockwise, then that means just that: special effects are resolved in a clockwise order, so the effects of a player going after you are and can only be resolved after you have resolved your effects. If the rules state this strictly, then you cannot change the order as you wish (it's a part of the game anyhow).

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  • "It's a hard, linear life in Board Game Town…" – V-J May 31 '15 at 22:10
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    Re "What do the rules explicitly say?", Nothing. The whole playing part of the instruction is implied, so there's no hint from the number of the noun. "If more than one player wants to use a Special ability, start with the current player and go around the table clockwise until all players pass in sequence". – ikegami Jun 1 '15 at 1:59
  • Okay, well that clarifies it a bit: if the wording is indeed "a special ability", then each player at their turn has to choose between using a single special ability or passing, after which the turn passes clockwise to the next player; after every player has passed in a row (i.e. nobody can any longer use or want to use a special ability) the play continues. – V-J Jun 1 '15 at 5:54
  • I agree that they all go in one go. It says you play until you pass. If you play a special ability, you still haven't passed yet. – Samthere Jun 1 '15 at 8:41
  • @V-J, No, it doesn't indicate that at all. It doesn't imply anything one way or another. If a player wants to play a special ability is what triggers the special ability "phase". He can definitely play more than one, and nothing says whether he can play more than one at once or not. – ikegami Jun 1 '15 at 11:58

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