7

This question already has an answer here:

When you have the card face down then you morph the card to face up, does it suffer summoning sickness? My friend has lots of them in his deck and I'm not too sure and would like to know whether they suffer from summoning sickness the turn they are morphed.

marked as duplicate by diego, Toon Krijthe, murgatroid99 magic-the-gathering Jul 22 '15 at 17:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

9

Playing creatures face down and turning them face up (commonly called morphing/unmorphing) has no effect on them having summoning sickness. Unless they have haste, they have summoning sickness until they've been in play since the beginning of your most recent turn, whether they've been turned face up or not.

For example, if you play a creature face down then immediately turn it face up, it still has summoning sickness until your next turn. Similarly, if you play a creature face down, wait til it no longer has summoning sickness, and then turn it face up, it still doesn't have summoning sickness.


Morph does have a lot of interesting rules associated with it, but a morphed creature is still a creature. Morph means:

You may cast this card as a 2/2 face-down creature with no text, no name, no subtypes, and no mana cost by paying {3} rather than paying its mana cost.

There's nothing in there about having haste, so like all creatures, it has summoning sickness. (It can't attack, and its activated abilities with a tap or untap symbol in their costs can't be activated unless it's been under your control since the beginning of your most recent turn.)

Similarly, turning it face up has its share of rules, but all it really does is turn the creature face up:

[pay the cost] ... turn the permanent face up. ... The morph effect on it ends, and it regains its normal characteristics.

It's still the same creature it was before, so if it already had summoning sickness, it still does, and if it didn't have summoning sickness, it still doesn't.

  • 4
    If a morphed creature would switch zones, or play has finished, it must be revealed - see rule 707.9. – The Forest And The Trees Jun 29 '15 at 11:15
  • 5
    @Pacerier Best to ask things like that as new questions so everyone can benefit and you can get full answers! – Cascabel Jun 29 '15 at 14:43
  • 1
    @murgatroid99 the majority of the questions refers to how they will have "summoning sickness", but in reality they follow the same rules. Yes, the conclusion is correct, but the poor wording here can lead to even more confusion. I wouldn't concern myself about it, but for some reason it's the most upvoted answer atm. – RubberDuck Jun 29 '15 at 16:37
  • 3
    In your answer, I would use "play face down" and "turn face up" instead of "morph" and "unmorph". If you look closely at the question, you'll notice that the OP thinks "morph" means "turn face up", which is exactly the opposite of how you have used the same term in your answer. Also (and this is really getting picky), when 90% of the sentences in your answer have three or four clauses broken up with commas, it is hard to read. Try to vary your sentence structure (short and to the point, lengthy explanation, short again, long again, etc.). – Rainbolt Jun 29 '15 at 17:06
  • 2
    @Pacerier At this point, you're asking unrelated questions in the comments. Please post your question as an actual question or take it to chat. – Alex P Jun 30 '15 at 14:32
4

Let's recollect the summoning sickness rule:

302.6. A creature’s activated ability with the tap symbol or the untap symbol in its activation cost can’t be activated unless the creature has been under its controller’s control continuously since his or her most recent turn began. A creature can’t attack unless it has been under its controller’s control continuously since his or her most recent turn began. This rule is informally called the “summoning sickness” rule.

A creature with morph fully obeys this rule. If you cast a creature and then morph it on the same turn - it will suffer from summoning sickness. If you morph it during next turns and you didn't lose control of it - it won't suffer from summoning sickness and will be able to attack or use "tap" activated abilities.

3

No, it won't have "summoning sickness" unless it already had it.

Turning the card face up ("morphing") just changes its characteristics, just like Giant Growth does. Turning the card face up doesn't give or take away "summoning sickness" any more than Giant Growth does.

If you haven't controlled the card since the beginning of your turn, it has summoning sickness. If it's a creature, it can't attack, and you can't use it's {T} or {Q} abilities.

302.6. A creature’s activated ability with the tap symbol or the untap symbol in its activation cost can’t be activated unless the creature has been under its controller’s control continuously since his or her most recent turn began. A creature can’t attack unless it has been under its controller’s control continuously since his or her most recent turn began. This rule is informally called the “summoning sickness” rule.

1

Morphing doesn't actually change the state of summoning sickness at all. Summoning sickness is more a property of the card, and it affects cards that have Creature type.

So, if the card has summoning sickness while it's face-down, it'll still have summoning sickness when it's turned face up. If it doesn't have summoning sickness, turning it face-up won't re-give it summoning sickness: it's in the clear, it can attack and pay tap costs immediately, etc.

The lore behind morphing has always had the notion of a creature leaping out from disguise when it was turned face up. In the Onslaught block, morph creatures came from a spider-shaped shell. In Tarkir, morph takes on the flavour of being obscured by dragon magic:

In the story, morph is descended from a draconic magic. The humans (and humanoid creatures) of Tarkir managed to take the draconic magic and warp it to their own means. The key to the magic is that it hides the identity of the creature using it, making it harder to fight against, as you are forced to fight blindly without any knowledge of your foe.

So you're not summoning a new creature out of Morph that would obtain summoning sickness; the creature casts its disguise aside fully alert.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.