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I was playing Black Plague with my friends and we got into a misunderstanding about a very basic and fundamental rule.

For me it was clear that, when a weapon has several dice to be played (like 2), I can kill at most 2 zombies; each successful die kills one zombie in the zone I chose to attack (both melee and ranged).

However, my friend argued that we can only kill at most one zombie; the several dice help with the odds, but even if we get multiple successes, we kill a single zombie in the area.

I was pretty sure I was right, but scanning through the guide I found out it really doesn't make very clear in the Combat Section what is the case. The text is messy and a little hard to understand for me.

Can someone resolve this conundrum?

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From the rules for melee combat,

Each die roll equal or higher than the Accuracy value on the weapon’s card is a successful hit. The player divides his hits as he wishes among the possible targets in the Zone.

This means that a melee attack landing three hits could target and kill up to three creatures.

Ranged combat works the same way, except there are limitations in the order in which you can target monsters (targeting priority).

Keep in mind that there's no point in assigning more than one hit per creature.

Fatties are killed with a 2 Damage hit (or more). It does not matter how many hits you obtain with a weapon that inflicts 1 Damage. A Fatty will absorb the hits without flinching.

Abominations are killed with a 3 Damage hit (or more). As no weapon naturally has Damage 3 in Zombicide: Black Plague, you have to destroy the monster with Dragon Fire (see page 35) or with Samson using a Damage 2 Melee weapon in conjunction with his +1 Damage: Melee Skill.

  • That's even odder than what I thought! AFAIK, I can only kill a Fatty with a weapon that has two damage -- if I redirected two 1 damage attacks to the guy he would 'regen' between each hit, and feel no effect at all. – Luan Nico Dec 29 '16 at 10:14
  • @Luan Nico, Fixed. – ikegami Dec 29 '16 at 16:05

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