1

The Wikipedia page is kind of vague on when the different board designs were produced.

I’d like to know more specifically when the original 4-player board with a backing was replaced by the folding 6-player board that did not have a backing?

Also, does anyone have photos or recall for sure what color was the face of the board? I do recall that the outside edges of the side of the box were a sort of pale gold.

Did it come with a specific color and size of die? I recall a transparent green die but that might not have been original.

2

At the BGG website the various versions of the Aggravation game are listed on the following webpage:

https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/2272/aggravation/versions

Although Wikipedia states "Aggravation ... was first produced in 1960 by CO-5 Company," the first BGG version is listed as being produced (published in BGG lingo) in 1962. BGG lists two versions by CO-5 Company for 1962, one of which was for 6 players. There is also a Canadian version published in 1962.

4 player version for 1962 https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgameversion/33017/co-5-square-box-edition

6 player version for 1962 https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgameversion/33015/co-5-edition-1962 Clicking on the picture shows that version with a pair of white dice.

Does this information answer your question?

0

I would beg to differ with you. I was told as a very young girl that my grandfather- Harold Sullivan- designed made the 1st boards in his Oak Park IL basement circa 1951. I have a few old pictures from the mid 50’s of the family members and friends that would crowd their living and dining rooms on Sunday afternoons to play and hold tournaments. Grandpa made a marble board for himself and Grandma and my siblings and I still have the hand-made boards that he made for us. As the story is told, after he negotiated and sold the design, he and Grandma sold the OakPark home and moved to Florida

  • 1
    Hey Patricia! Welcome to B&CG, would you be able to share any of those old pictures? I'd love to see a picture of the hand made boards as well. Thank you so much for sharing your personal history! – Pat Ludwig Nov 28 '18 at 2:45

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