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I'm playing as Imperium with four other players. We did first main and secondary missions, both ending the same way in Rebel favour. On the second to last round one Hero, who was the least damaged, used both his actions to move, gaining 10 movement points, then he simply ran through my squad. He had to move through 2 tiles occupied by my soldiers, leaving him 6 tiles of free movement. Enough to hide behind corner. It was last activation in round, so as new one began Rebels started with that player. He exhausted himself for movement to reach an objective and used both actions to activate it. He passed the test on the first try, and I couldn't do anything to stop that.

Similar thing happened mid-mission - one rebel stormed through defenses, got wounded next round, but still managed to activate terminal while others were on the way to next one. As he was wounded and slow I moved my troops to defend third (last) objective, and then situation above happened.

I was happy with result, game ended with two heroes wounded, third in the bring of and completely exhausted, and forth with half health that managed to finish. However I am posotive that without that rush I'd hold them off long enough. How can I stop them from doing that again?

  • I though about moving my troops close enough to objective, so it would be impossible to activate without mowing my men down, but it would mean spending less time attacking, giving them enough power to wipe my squad. – Krzysztof Skibiński Jan 23 '17 at 12:04
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There are usually about three things you can do to slow rebels down:

  • Big damage, forcing them to rest - the most obvious way, but very situational if it will work enough to slow them down for a specific round or objective (though it is always good, the closer to wounding you get them the better—it just may not be enough if your one goal is objective positioning denial)
  • Stun - Stuns (and other Harmful conditions, but stuns are the most effective) reduce their action choices and uses, which is a big help
  • Figure blocking - get your figures in their way (most heroes have to use extra movement points to go through you) or park them on/around the objective you wish to deny (they can't stop their movement temporarily on you to perform an Interact); lots of small figures in one deployment card (Troopers for example) or Large figures work well for this, but you get enough of anything and it can get the job done

Personally, I would generally only use the third option as a last resort. For one, it jams you up so it's more difficult to attack because of a lack of line of sight for the figures in the back of your denial pile. But mostly because it's not too fun to play with nor against that tactic. But it is a viable tactic nonetheless.

  • the first suggestion didn't pan out, second was unavaiable, (but from now on with more threat per round i might afford better hand,) and third one I explained in comment why it was inappropriate. – Krzysztof Skibiński Jan 24 '17 at 8:14

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