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My question relates to 706. Copying Objects, more specifically 706.1 which states:

706.1.: Some objects become or turn another object into a “copy” of a spell, permanent, or card. Some effects create a token that’s a copy of another object.

Does this mean that a "copy" is not a "token"?

The scenario was that I had an Anointed Procession which states:

If an effect would create one or more tokens under your control, it creates twice that many of those tokens instead.

Then I cast Clone which states:

You may have Clone enter the battlefield as a copy of any creature on the battlefield.

So my question is simply, would I only get one copy of that creature? Or 2 because it is a "token"?

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    Cards are never tokens, and tokens are never cards. (Keep in mind that even if you represent a token with something a lay person would call a card, it's still not a considered a card by the game.) – ikegami Oct 26 '17 at 18:12
  • Even if you copy a card and Wizards never prints tokens for them (like Pack Rat, for example) it's still a token.. – corsiKa Oct 26 '17 at 23:29
  • Look at the period in 706.1. That period separates the idea of an object becoming a copy and a token being created as a copy. – Andrew Jan 12 '18 at 18:58
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Clone has no interaction here with Anointed Procession. Clone does not make tokens, and it is not a token.

Tokens are defined in rule 110.5:

Some effects put tokens onto the battlefield. A token is a marker used to represent any permanent that isn’t represented by a card.

In your situation, Clone is a card, not a token.

In addition, the full text of the rule you mentioned, rule 706.1 is

Some objects become or turn another object into a “copy” of a spell, permanent, or card. Some effects create a token that’s a copy of another object. [...]

This is describing two different kinds of effects. Clone is the first kind of effect: it becomes a copy of a permanent. Some other effects will explicitly say that the create tokens, or they will create tokens with some specific keyword abilities or actions like Populate or Fabricate.

  • Pack Rat's activated ability is an example of the other kind of effect (one that does create a token and would be affected by Anointed Procession). – Rainbolt Oct 26 '17 at 21:27
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To add to the other answers, copying a permanent does not copy whether or not the target is a token or a card. Clone, as a card, will always be a card even if it is copying a token. An effect that produces token copies will always produce tokens even if they are copying cards.

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You will only get 1 copy of that creature, and that copy will still be represented by the Clone card that you have.

Copies and Tokens have nothing to do with each other.

A token is a non-card object that is a permanent on the battlefield. It acts like a card most ways, but has a few differences, mostly dealing with what happens when they change zones.

108.2b Tokens aren’t considered cards—even a card-sized game supplement that represents a token isn’t considered a card for rules purposes.

110.5. Some effects put tokens onto the battlefield. A token is a marker used to represent any permanent that isn’t represented by a card.

Copying an object deals with what attributes the object has. Clone is a card that happens to be able to change its attributes to match those of another creature.

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You misinterpret 706.1 (emphasis mine):

706.1.: Some objects become or turn another object into a “copy” of a spell, permanent, or card. Some effects create a token that’s a copy of another object.

The wording insists on how a copy is done: by transforming an existing object, or by creating a new object.

Now two examples of this difference:

  • A Clone becomes the copy of another creature: that's a transformation of an existing object, nothing is created.
  • A Cackling Counterpart creates a new object (a creature in this case). You use a token to represent that new object.

Be also aware that a token, even if represented by a card on the battlefield, is a token and never a card. To make that clear, the wording of cards like Forbidden Ritual was changed. Playing with a token you make with pen and paper or a token card is always equivalent.

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